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Poet Mike Delp addresses a men's gathering in Cedar, Michigan. He recently authored a new collection of poetry called, 'Lying in the River's Dark Bed.'
Dan Wanschura

On a recent Saturday evening in Cedar, Michigan, about 40 guys are gathered in the home of Jeff Smith, the editor of Traverse magazine. The night is centered around beer and poetry. The beverage of choice is from the recently opened Lake Ann Brewing Company. The poet is Mike Delp.

Mike Delp has a new book titled Lying in the River’s Dark Bed. It’s what he calls the confluence of the Deadman and the Mad Angler— characters he’s has been crafting for years.  

 

Lou Kasischke

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the 1996 Mt. Everest disaster, when eight mountain climbers died while caught in a blizzard. The disaster was documented in the book and subsequent film Into Thin Air.

Harbor Springs resident Lou Kasischke was part of the group on the mountain that day, and wrote his own book about the experience. After the Wind was published in 2014.

Former altar girl pens chapbook on clerical sexual abuse

May 10, 2016

Writer and poet Kelly Fordon grew up as a Catholic altar girl in the 1970s, and has published The Witness, a chapbook centered around sexual abuse by Catholic priests.

Chapbooks are used by poets to focus on a single theme or topic. 

Fordon never expected to write against the Catholic Church, but believes that people shouldn't be so quick to defend priests accused of abuse. Fordon joined Cynthia Canty on today's Stateside to discuss The Witness.

National Writers Series: An evening with Laurie R. King

Apr 26, 2016

Laurie R. King is best-known for her series of books based on Sherlock Holmes. She's the author of fourteen mysteries featuring her character Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes as crime-solving partners. She talked this hour with fellow author Cari Noga.

Childhood summers spent fishing and swimming in a pristine Northern Michigan lake would later inspire Ernest Hemingway's The Last Good Country.

The newly-opened Hotel Walloon is borrowing that reference for the name of an upcoming weekend devoted to celebrating the literary giant's Michigan connection.

 

It’s a trying moment in the life of a pet owner: the worry that something is wrong with our furry friend.

But it can be hard for pet owners to tell what’s happening with their pet and when it’s time to head to the veterinarian's office.

Dr. Michael Petty understands those questions. In fact, he gets them all the time at his Arbor Pointe Veterinary Hospital and the Animal Pain Center in Canton.

The rumor mill is certainly thriving in the 21st century.

But roll the clock back a few hundred years, and we see that not much has changed. Even without the help of Facebook or Twitter, rumors spread quickly in early America.

 

These rumors may have been groundless, but they managed to take root and affected many important issues of the day.

National Writers Series: An evening with James Tobin

Apr 8, 2016

James Tobin is a journalisthistorian, biographer, and professor. He’s written books about World War II journalist Ernie Pyle and aviation pioneers Orville and Wilbur Wright. Tobin’s latest work of narrative nonfiction is The Man He Became: How FDR Defied Polio to Win the Presidency.” He talked with former newspaper editor Bob Giles, who asked Tobin how he got the idea to write a book about Ernie Pyle.

Many women can relate to the witching hour. In the middle of the night, you wake up and have trouble falling back to sleep because your mind is racing. Concerns about the upcoming day, anxiety about the mounting to-do list while, oftentimes, your partner sleeps soundly next to you.

The literary world suffered a significant loss over the weekend when Michigan author and writer Jim Harrison passed away at the age of 78 at his home in Arizona.

Harrison wrote more than three dozen books, including novels like True North, Dalva, and numerous collections of poetry.

In a career that began in the 1960s — and brought comparisons to Faulkner and Hemingway — Jim Harrison wrote more than three dozen books, including the novels Dalva and True North, the novella Legends of the Fall and many collections of poetry. He died Saturday in Patagonia, Ariz., at the age of 78, his publisher has confirmed to NPR.

A glance into a dystopian future—Michael Dow will read from his Sci-Fi thriller, Dark Matters.

Then we’ll explore renegade parenting with Heather Shumaker as she talks about her new book, It’s OK to Go UP the Slide.

At the end Fleda Brown will provide a commentary on the work of Michigan poet, Thomas Lynch.

There are roughly 42,000 men and women serving time in prison in the state of Michigan. They all have stories of how they got there, ranging from poor choices and a bad upbringing to just being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Shaka Senghor, a leading criminal justice reform activist, is now telling his story. He is currently a mentor to youth, and a leader in helping victims and violent offenders heal through the power of the arts. But he didn’t start out that way.

Bonnie Jo Campbell grew up in western Michigan, and her stories draw on her experiences with the dark side of rural life. Her latest collection of short stories is called “Mothers, Tell Your Daughters.” She talks this hour with poet, essayist, and undertaker Thomas Lynch. Campbell starts off the program talking about her book “American Salvage.”

Whether you're a 65-year-old senior VP whose job has been eliminated or a 22-year-old with a freshly minted degree, trying to land a job is scary stuff.

Michigan native Matt Durfee has recruited for some of the biggest companies in the nation, and he has lost his job and had to navigate his way to a new position – not once, but several times.

National Writers Series: An evening with Susan Casey

Jan 14, 2016

Susan Casey is former editor-in-chief for O, the Oprah Magazine. She’s the author of three books: “The Devil’s Teeth,” about great white sharks, “The Wave,” about the people who surf and study giant waves, and her latest, “Voices In the Ocean: A Journey Into the Wild and Haunting World of Dolphins.”

When prospective parents consider the possibility of adopting a child, they think about what advantages they might offer a child: a loving, stable home with economic and education advantages that the child might not otherwise have.

But as the years go on and that child grows up, there can be pitfalls and problems that no one can foresee.

And, if the child is of a different race and ethnic background than the adoptive parents, the pitfalls can be especially challenging.

Historians Larry and Priscilla Massie have opened Massie's Michigan Books (by appointment only) at their Allegan home.  

“For the last 35 years I’ve stuck away any book about Michigan that I came across with the intention of opening a book shop,” said author Larry Massie, who has written numerous books about Michigan. 

Massie built an addition on his home for the new store that houses about 5,000 books from fiction and poetry to railroading and shipwrecks.

The latest novel from Mitch Albom is a magical walk through much of the 20th century’s best music.

National Writers Series: An evening with John U. Bacon

Dec 31, 2015

On this broadcast from the National Writers Series, John U. Bacon tells the story of meeting with legendary University of Michigan coach Bo Schembechler after writing an article about Michigan football. Bacon has covered sports for various newspapers and has written numerous books about University of Michigan athletics.

One of life’s greatest gifts is its ability to surprise us.

How could R.J. Fox know that going on the E.T. ride in Hollywood would lead him to the woman he’d want to marry? And from there, in the name of love, on to her home country Ukraine?

That’s where Fox was surprised by scowling old babushka-wearing ladies, a farmer who nearly beat him up for trying to photograph his goat, future in-laws he hoped to impress, and vodka. Lots and lots of vodka.

Fox tells the story in his new memoir Love and Vodka: My Surreal Adventures in Ukraine.

National Writers Series: An evening with Sarah Chayes

Dec 10, 2015

Sarah Chayes has worked as a foreign correspondent for National Public Radio and lived for a decade in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Her latest book is called “Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security.” Chayes grew up being interested in international affairs by having parents who were active in several presidential administrations. She talks this hour with Jack Segal, former diplomat and co-chair of Traverse City’s International Affairs Forum. Segal started off asking Chayes what it was like growing up with parents who were prominent in Washington politics.

Vanessa Diffenbaugh's first novel, The Language of Flowers, is about a foster child aging out of the system. Her second and latest book, We Never Asked for Wings, takes on immigration and education. Vanessa Diffenbaugh's books tackle big topics that highlight regular peoples' struggles and triumphs. Diffenbaugh talked to Sarah Bearup-Neal, a writer and artist from Glen Arbor.

National Writers Series: An evening with Hampton Sides

Oct 5, 2015

On this program from the National Writers Series, Hampton Sides explains why he's drawn to war. Sides is the author of "Ghost Soldiers, which tells the story of how U.S. soldiers rescued POWs from a Japanese prison camp in World War II. His latest book is called "In the Kingdom of Ice." It recounts the polar voyage of the USS Jeannette and the crew's battle for survival.

Detroit has collapsed into ruin, and a man named Kelly is earning a living as a scrapper.

He picks through the thousands of abandoned buildings, stealing scrap metal and then selling it to salvage yards in Scrapper, the newest novel from Michigan author Matt Bell.

The New York Times describes Scrapper as, “equal parts dystopian novel, psychological thriller and literary fiction.”

Bell says he likes that description, but thinks of the novel also as a detective story.

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