Northern Michigan

Tell us your pandemic stories

Mar 24, 2020
Gretchen Carr

 

The pandemic is affecting not only our health as individuals and communities, but our livelihoods, economy and political system in many ways.

During this time, Interlochen Public Radio wants to know how the crisis is affecting your life in northern Michigan. What are you doing in response? What's the hardest part? How do you pass the time? What about your neighbors?

Ty Schmidt got the idea and let us know something he is thankful for in this madness.


Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Michigan rises nearly every day. As the pandemic worsens, putting food on the table is getting harder for some people in rural communities.

Now school districts are rushing to feed students that relied on school lunches, and food pantries in northern Michigan are trying to feed the rest.

Hofbrau Food & Spirits in Interlochen put out a sign letting patrons know they can still order takeout in light of Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's executive order that closes sit-down service at bars and restaurants across the state.
Peter Payette / Interlochen Public Radio

As Michigan’s dine-in restaurants grapple with Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s executive order to stop sit-in service, some are switching to takeout and delivery. 

This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
CDC/ Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS

Sunday night, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, confirmed there are now 53 cases of COVID-19 in Michigan

No cases have been reported in northern Michigan yet, but health officials say it's just a matter of time before the coronavirus hits northern Michigan.

Is northern Michigan prepared?

Aaron Selbig

Grand Traverse County has joined a growing list of Michigan counties declaring support for the second amendment with a resolution passed by county officials.

National Writers Series: An evening with Steve Luxenberg

Feb 27, 2020
Alan Newton

Steve Luxenberg is a journalist, editor, and author. He last visited Traverse City in 2014 when he spoke on the stage of the City Opera House about his book “Annie’s Ghosts.” Steve’s latest book is “Separate: The Story of Plessy Versus Ferguson, and America’s Journey from Slavery to Segregation.” It tells the story of the landmark 1896 Supreme Court case that shaped the nation’s “separate but equal” race policies for over half a century. Steve talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio Morning Edition host Dan Wanschura. Dan asked Steve how long it took to write his latest book.

Alan Newton

Nicholas Kristof and Cheryl WuDunn are both Pulitzer Prize winning journalists. They’re also a married couple who have written several books together, including “Half the Sky” and “A Path Appears.” Their latest book is “Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope.” It focuses on the decline of the American working class, from the perspective of Nicholas’s childhood hometown, Yamhill, Oregon. Nicholas and Cheryl talk this hour with Nate Payne, editor for the Traverse City Record-Eagle. Nate asked Cheryl how she and Nicholas balance their writing and married life.

Courtesy

In September 1999, Kenneth Stearns was riding his motorcycle through Meriden, Kansas, when a truck pulled out in front of him.  

“All I remember on the accident is the truck when he pulled out in front of me, and I had to brake and turn, and as soon as I braked, I lost everything," he says. "I don’t remember anything after that.”

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan’s tart cherry industry is dying out to the tune of $5 million dollars of lost impact to the state since 2010, according to a Michigan State University study.

After another trade loss in January, cherry farmers are considering desperate measures.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Nick Nissley took over as the 11th President of Northwestern Michigan College in Traverse City on Jan. 1. 

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

 

Each year thousands of people enter a lottery to hunt elk in northern Michigan, but only 200 people win tags.

To ensure success, most hunters hire a guide. Increasingly, elk guides are breaking hunting laws, so hunters are guaranteed a shot. Some guides are now worried the rule breakers are damaging the sport’s reputation.

At the elk park in Gaylord, guide Preston Casselman watches elk chew cud and relax.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Syringe service programs involve giving medical supplies and clean needles to injection drug users.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say people in those programs are three times more likely to stop using drugs than those who aren't in them.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

 

Michigan cherry farmers were in Washington, D.C. Tuesday to make their final case for U.S. imposed tariffs on Turkish cherry products.

Tart cherry farmers in Michigan are suffering the fallout of an international trade war. While farmers wait to see where those political cards fall, many in northern Michigan are bearing down for the winter. 

National Writers Series: An evening with Garth Stein

Nov 19, 2019

Author and filmmaker Garth Stein is best known for his novel, “The Art of Racing in the Rain.” In 2019, that book was made into a movie starring Kevin Costner as the voice of the dog, Enzo. Garth’s latest book is “A Sudden Light.” In 2020, he’ll release his first graphic novel series, called “The Cloven.” Garth visited Traverse City in 2015 and talked with journalist and artist Sarah Bearup-Neal on the stage of the City Opera House. Sarah asked Garth to talk a little about his work making and producing films.

National Writers Series: An evening with Benjamin Busch

Nov 18, 2019

Benjamin Busch is best known for his acting career. He played the character of officer Tony Colicchio in the HBO series “The Wire.” But Ben is active in many creative pursuits, including writing, filmmaking, photography, and stonemasonry. He’s written many poems and essays for various collections and periodicals. Ben is also a veteran officer of the U.S. Marine Corps and served two tours in Iraq. His memoir “Dust to Dust” came out in 2012. That year, Ben talked with Doug Stanton on the stage of the City Opera House in Traverse City. Doug asked him what made him want to write a memoir.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, we’re talking about baiting and hunting, and the ongoing debate about whether to keep deer healthy versus taking away a tool for hunting. 

Plus, a turkey hunter tells us why he loves the sport.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

Firearm deer season begins Friday.

It’s also the first opening day in about 10 years where hunters won’t be able to bait deer because of a baiting ban.

National Writers Series: An evening with Paula McLain

Nov 14, 2019

Paula McLain is best known as the author of “The Paris Wife,” which is a work of historical fiction telling the story of Ernest Hemingway’s first marriage. Her latest book, “Love and Ruin,” is about Hemingway’s third marriage, to war correspondent Martha Gellhorn. Paula visited Traverse City in 2015 and talked with fellow author Benjamin Busch on the stage of the City Opera House. At that time, Paula’s book “Circling the Sun,” about aviator Beryl Markham, had recently come out. Before becoming a novelist, Paula published two collections of poetry.

National Writers Series: An evening with Blaine Harden

Nov 13, 2019

Blaine Harden is an author and journalist, writing for the Washington Post, The New York Times, Frontline on PBS, and others. He’s written five books, three of them about the Korean peninsula. Blaine’s book “Escape from Camp 14” tells the story of Shin Don-hyuk, the only known person born in a North Korean labor camp who has escaped. His most recent book is “King of Spies,” about a rogue American spy in Korea. Blaine visited Traverse City in 2013 and talked with former U.S. State Department official Jack Segal on the stage of the City Opera House.

National Writers Series: An evening with Peter Matthiessen

Nov 13, 2019

Author Peter Matthiessen died in 2014. During his lifetime, he wrote over thirty books. He’s well-known for his nonfiction like “The Snow Leopard,” which traces his journey to the Tibetan plateau in the Himalayas. He also wrote fiction, with novels like “At Play in the Fields of the Lord,” the Watson trilogy, and “Far Tortuga.” Peter’s final book was the 2014 novel “In Paradise.” His official biography, called “True Nature,” is currently being written and is scheduled to be published by Knoph/Pantheon in 2022.

Bryce Hoffman is an author, speaker, and consultant. He wrote about the Ford Motor Company and the auto industry bailout in his book, “American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save the Ford Motor Company.” A.J. Baime is a journalist who wrote "Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm an America at War." Bryce and A.J. visited Traverse City in 2014 and talked with auto industry writer Jean Jennings on the stage of the City Opera House. Jean asked A.J. to start off the evening talking about his book.

John L. Russell

Nelson DeMille has written twenty-one novels, including “Plum Island,” “The Charm School,” and “The Cuban Affair.” His book “The General’s Daughter” was made into a movie starring John Travolta. Nelson’s latest book, “The Deserter,” is a collaboration with his son Alex, who is a screenwriter and film editor. Nelson and Alex talk this hour with WTCM NewsTalk 580 radio host Ron Jolly. Ron asked Nelson to talk about a time in his life before he became a writer, serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam.

On the next edition of Michigan Writers on the Air: Katey Schultz will read from her new novel Still Come Home, a story is set inAfghanistan. Stephen Lewis talks about The Wolfkeeper, a collection of short stories written byhis late wife, Carolyn Lewis. At the end, Fleda Brown talks with Jennifer Steinorth about her first major collection of poems, A Wake with Nine Shades. Please join Aaron Stander and guests Katey Schultz, Steven Lewis, JenniferSteinorth and Fleda Brown on the next edition of Michigan Writers on the Air.  

National Writers Series: An evening with Roy Blount Jr.

Oct 30, 2019

Humorist, journalist and author Roy Blount Jr. has written over two dozen books, as well as many articles for various periodicals. He’s also a frequent panelist on National Public Radio’s “Wait Wait... Don’t Tell Me” program. Roy’s most recent book is “Save Room for Pie: Food Songs and Chewy Ruminations.” Roy visited Traverse City in 2011 and talked with Doug Stanton on the stage of the City Opera House. At that time, Roy’s book “Alphabetter Juice” had recently been released.

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