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Morgan Springer

Contributing editor

Morgan Springer is a contributing editor and producer at Interlochen Public Radio. She previously worked for the New England News Collaborative as the host/producer of NEXT, the weekly show which aired on six public radio station in the region. 

Before her stint in the Northeast, Morgan worked full-time at IPR – first as an intern, then as a reporter and finally as the news director. Her series "Irredeemable," about Michigan juvenile lifers and the state's re-sentencing process, received a 2017 first place national PMJA award and a regional Edward R. Murrow award. Her stories "Irredeemable, episode 3: Tortured choice,""Grandmother's letter from the Holocaust" and "Behind bars, transformation through poetry" have also recieved national awards. Her work has been featured on NPR, public radio stations in the Midwest and New England, WHYY's "The Pulse" and National Native News.

Morgan has an undergraduate degree in International Studies from Earlham College. After graduating, she did a stint as the constituent services coordinator for the Massachusetts Attorney General's Office before leaving to work at a garden center. In 2014, she went to the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies to study radio and documentary film, bringing her briefly back to her home state of Maine.

  • In February, gray wolves went back on the endangered species list. But it wasn't because the population suddenly plummeted. It had more to do with an ongoing fight between stakeholders who have strong, opposing feelings about protecting wolves. This episode was originally produced in February 2022, as part of a seven part series, titled [Un]Natural Selection.
  • In February, gray wolves went back on the endangered species list. But it wasn't because the population suddenly plummeted. It had more to do with an ongoing fight between stakeholders who have strong, opposing feelings about protecting wolves. This episode was originally produced in February 2022, as part of a seven part series, titled [Un]Natural Selection.
  • The state attorney general’s office has reached a settlement with the owners of more than two dozen Mackinaw City hotels. They'll pay thousands of dollars and change their business practices.
  • Most of the freshwater in the U.S. is in the Great Lakes. That’s why some in the region worry western states will come after it. But others say the real danger is commodifying water. Next time on Points North, the ethics and economics of trading water futures.
  • Most of the freshwater in the U.S. is in the Great Lakes. That’s why some in the region worry western states will come after it. But others say the real danger is commodifying water. Next time on Points North, the ethics and economics of trading water futures.
  • This week we’re featuring an episode of Outside/In from New Hampshire Public Radio. It’s a podcast about the natural world and how we use it. Whether you grow them, collect them or grind them up and swallow them, antlers are one of the most astonishing sets of bones on the planet.
  • This week we’re featuring an episode of Outside/In from New Hampshire Public Radio. It’s a podcast about the natural world and how we use it. Whether you grow them, collect them or grind them up and swallow them, antlers are one of the most astonishing sets of bones on the planet.
  • This month, gray wolves went back on the endangered species list. But it wasn’t because the population suddenly plummeted. It had more to do with an ongoing fight between stakeholders who have strong, opposing feelings about protecting wolves.
  • This month, gray wolves went back on the endangered species list. But it wasn’t because the population suddenly plummeted. It had more to do with an ongoing fight between stakeholders who have strong, opposing feelings about protecting wolves.
  • A hotel owner in Mackinaw City is being accused of unlawful business practices.In a letter to the owners Tuesday, the Michigan Attorney General’s Office announced it’s investigating hotels owned by the Lieghio family.