Traverse City Area Public Schools

Taylor Wizner

The Traverse City Area Public Schools Board of Education narrowed their list of superintendent candidates Monday night.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

The Traverse City Area Public Schools Board of Education will interview five candidates for the superintendent vacancy. The first round of virtual interviews starts April 25, according to a press release. 

Morgan Springer

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer suspended in-person learning for the remainder of the school year under an executive order, on Thursday, April 2.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Michigan public school buildings will be closed but districts will recieve most, if not all, of their alloted funding from the state. 

Wikimedia Commons

Northern Michigan school districts are trying to help families impacted by the coronavirus pandemic, following an order from Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on Friday to close Michigan's public schools. 

On top of closures, the following districts have sent messages to students and parents regarding food availability and alternatives to in-person instruction.

Traverse City Area Public Schools:

Nancy Deneen

Interlochen Center for the Arts (ICA) is sending students home as schools and universities across Michigan take precautions to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

No ICA students or staff currently have the disease, but the move is meant to prevent its possible spread. ICA President Trey Devey broke the news to students at a meeting Thursday, which was livestreamed on the academy's website.

Max Johnston

The firm looking for the new superintendent of Traverse City Area Public Schools is in the district to hear from parents this week. Representatives from Hazard, Young, Attea & Associates (HYAA) held an open forum Tuesday to get input from parents on the search.

Trust, financial accumen and communication skills were several traits that parents said they wanted to see in the new superintendent.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

Language to recall three members of the Traverse City Area Public Schools Board was approved Tuesday.

The recall efforts aim to remove Sue Kelly, Matt Anderson and Pam Forton from the board. They have 10 days to appeal.

Traverse City Area Public Schools

The former superintendent of Traverse City Area Public Schools got $180,000 as part of a separation agreement with the district. Ann Cardon resigned Oct. 17 after allegedly clashing with several school board members.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

It's been a rough couple of weeks for Traverse City Area Public Schools. Recently hired Superintendent Ann Cardon resigned last week. Now during the ensuing controversy, social media chatter has turned into efforts to recall several members of the district school board.

Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

In a radio interview with Vic McCarty on WTCM Monday morning, Traverse City Area Public Schools Board President Sue Kelly broke her silence on an alleged fallout with TCAPS Superintendent Ann Cardon.

Kelly dodged direct questions on Cardon or her future with the district.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Ann Cardon still has a job, for now.

She’s the superintendent of Traverse City Public Schools — a job she’s had for a little over two months, after the school board unanimously voted to offer her the position earlier this year.

Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

The board of Traverse City Area Public Schools could look at removing recently-appointed Superintendent Ann Cardon at a special meeting today, sources tell IPR

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, thousands of students are back in school. Hear how state efforts to improve reading and writing scores for third graders may be getting lost in translation.

Plus an interview with the new Superintendent of Traverse City Area Public Schools.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

In 2016, then Gov. Rick Snyder signed the controversial “Read by Grade Three” bill into law. It's meant to improve the reading and writing abilities of third graders in Michigan, but if their scores don’t rise students could be held back.

As the law starts to take effect, educators are frustrated with how it aims to get test scores up. 

Back to school

Morgan Springer

Traverse City Area Public Schools will pay back $707,000 to the state over allegedly miscalculated student enrollment, but they could have to give back more money.

The Michigan Department of Education says TCAPS may have miscalculated enrollment in at least two other semesters.

Morgan Springer

Traverse City Area Public Schools will have to pay back over $700,000 to the state over allegedly misreported student enrollment.

Morgan Springer

The hearing will determine if Traverse City Area Public Schools has to pay back over $700,000 to the state. The Michigan Department of Education planned to take back the money last year because TCAPS allegedly misreported student enrollment at the Northern Michigan Partnership, a homeschool program in Interlochen.

Traverse City Area Public Schools

A large financial gift to the public school system in Traverse City might save an elementary school. The last minute offer from an unknown individual has put Traverse City officials in an unusual position.

Traverse City Area Public Schools district has long been a leader in demanding that support for education in Michigan not depend on where a child lives. But school officials say this offer is one they have to consider.

This isn’t a new issue. Infusing private money into public schools is happening nationwide.

Morgan Springer

Since the announcement that three Traverse City Area Public Schools elementary schools might close, people are getting together to try to save them. They’re brainstorming ways to save money, make money or increase enrollment. 

The Old Mission Community Connection Group met last weekend at Peninsula Community Library. They’re hoping good ideas will save Old Mission Peninsula School, Interlochen Community School and the International School at Bertha Vos.

 


Soldiers who left school in the 1960s and early 1970s to fight in Vietnam now qualify for a high school diploma in Michigan.

As graduation ceremonies approach, leaders at Traverse City Area Public Schools are encouraging them to take advantage.

“There’s no course required for the veteran to come back to take. There’s no test that they need to pass,” says TCAPS Human Resources Executive Director Chris Davis. “It is a benefit that they deserve and that we are honored to be able to give to our veterans.”

Aaron Selbig

The robotics team from Traverse City Central High School is headed to St. Louis this week to compete in the world championship of robotics. The Raptors earned their ticket with a surprise victory in the state championship.

Megan Kral is still processing that moment when the final scores were revealed and the Raptors robotics team knew it had won the state championship.

Whooping cough outbreak sparks vaccination debate

Dec 3, 2014
Peter Payette

A growing outbreak of pertussis – or whooping cough – has Grand Traverse County residents on edge. As the number of confirmed cases ticks upward every few days, some parents are pulling their children out of school.

The outbreak has renewed questions about parents who choose not to vaccinate their children. Are they putting vulnerable people at risk? Or exercising their right to keep their kids free of vaccines they see as unnecessary?

A difficult decision

Northern Michigan’s largest school district has fewer students than it did last year – 70 fewer according to the head count yesterday. Traverse City Area Public Schools still serves more than 10,000 students.

Funding for schools in Michigan is based on student numbers. 70 fewer students would mean about $500,000 less for TCAPS.

Teachers Approve Three-Year Deal With TCAPS

Jun 3, 2014

UPDATED 6/4/2014

It looks like a deal has been reached between Traverse City Area Public Schools and its teachers. Members of the union have voted to accept a tentative deal that was hashed out over seven hours at the bargaining table Friday.

The agreement still has to be approved by the TCAPS board of education. That is expected to happen at their meeting Monday, according to the district's executive director of human resources, Chris Davis. She said this week that the deal falls within parameters set by the board.

Traverse City Area Public Schools can afford to increase teacher pay, but not to the level the union was hoping for. That’s according to a state fact finder who was called in this winter after negotiations stalled.

The teachers’ union wants a four percent pay raise, both for the current school year, and again for next school year. It’s a far cry from what the district proposed: no increase either year.

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