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Interlochen Public Radio

Grand Traverse County reports there are two residents with COVID-19 who likely became exposed in the community.

One woman in her 70s had not travelled or had contact with any known person with the disease, a county health department investigation found. She is currently in the hospital.

The county anticipated it would see community transmission eventually, Grand Traverse County Health Department Medical Director Michael Collins said in a release.

A woman walks across an empty Front Street in Traverse City on Saturday, March 28, 2020. Grand Traverse Health Department officials want visitors coming to the county coming from COVID-19 hot spots to self-quarantine for 14 days.
Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

If you’re traveling to Grand Traverse County, please quarantine yourself. That’s the message from the Grand Traverse County Health Department. It's requesting a 14-day self-quarantine for anyone coming to the county from areas with high numbers of COVID-19 cases.


In January there was an unusual line-up of planets at one place in the zodiac that included the Sun, Moon, Mercury, Saturn, and Pluto. Since then, they have all moved on, but due to the varying speeds of the planets in their orbits, it will appear to us that they all make a retrograde or backward motion, which will result in another meeting of planets in the same degree of the zodiac as in January, only the players will be slightly different. This time, it will only be Jupiter and Pluto.

Interlochen Public Radio

A Missaukee County man in his late 70s died this afternoon from COVID-19. 

The man was hospitalized at Munson Healthcare Cadillac Hospital on Tuesday for shortness of breath, according to District Health Department #10. He was tested for COVID-19 and results came back positive two days later.

The Greenfields stepped out for a safe social distance interview at Veterans Memorial Park in Ann Arbor. Left to right: Heather, Jill, Sonja and Gregory Greenfield from left to right, with Allison Greenfield up front.
Rick Pluta / Michigan Public Radio Network

School officials in Michigan will have to make some tough decisions very soon about the rest of the school year. One of them is whether to send layoff notices to teachers and other school staff who aren’t working.

That would save money for later in case the school year is extend to make up for days lost due to the COVID-19 outbreak.


NPR

The House is debating and then voting on the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package that the Senate passed earlier this week. Watch the floor proceedings live.

Essay: Uneventfulness

Mar 27, 2020

Several years ago, I heard a woman give a talk about a trip to Greenland where she lived with theInuit people, traveled by dog sled, ate raw seal meat. It wasn’t the kind of vacation most of us would choose—but for her, it was life-changing.

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

Health officials are worried about people traveling up north from downstate and other areas around the country to their second homes. 

Many are coming to northern Michigan to hunker down as the COVID-19 disease spreads in cities throughout the United States.

Health officials say they could be bringing the disease with them.

Today on Stateside, people in Detroit are getting hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, and hospitals are worried about a surge in patients overwhelming the city’s health care providers. Plus, as most other businesses shut down during the state's “stay at home” order, grocery stores are still open. We’ll hear what it’s like to be one of the workers at those stores.

Maria Farney (bottom left) teaches a Chinese student (top left) a song written by Traverse City singer songwriter Miriam Pico (right).
Miriam Pico

Traverse City singer songwriter Miriam Pico thought she was just writing a song to sing to her own kids. But now, kids in China are learning that song to help get through the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Aaron Selbig / Interlochen Public Radio

Grand Traverse County is declaring a state of emergency due to the coronavirus. Chairman of the county board of commissioners Rob Hentschel said in a letter that the declaration will make state and federal funds available to buy much needed equipment for hospitals and medical providers. 

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

Munson Healthcare, McLaren Northern Michigan and the Grand Traverse County Health Department are asking the public to donate medical supplies and protective gear.

They are asking for the following items in new and original packaging:

Today on Stateside, a West Michigan hospital puts into action a pandemic plan more than a decade in the making. Also, Michigan’s manufacturers assess the risks of entering the medical supply market amid a shortage of critical health care equipment needed for the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Across the state millions of Michiganders are staying at home after Gov. Gretchen Whitmer issued a "stay at home" order for at least the next three weeks. But what if you don’t have a home? The order makes no mention of people experiencing homelessness.

Courtesy Antonina Chehovska

Award-winning, Ukrainian-born soprano Antonina Chehovska wasn’t even thinking about opera until music professors at the Grand Rapids Community College noticed something special in her voice. 


Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

 

State-confirmed presumptive positive COVID-19 cases in northern Michigan:

Last updated March 29, 2020 at 4 p.m.

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

 

The Grand Traverse County Health Department says a symptomatic person who later tested positive for COVID-19 may have spread the disease in the community last week.

The sick person was on a Delta flight from Detroit Metro Airport that arrived in Traverse City at about 5 p.m. last Monday. The health department says people who were on that flight should self-quarantine until next Monday.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

Munson Medical Center in Traverse City has changed some of its policies for nurses working through the COVID-19 pandemic


Late last week, the hospital addressed a number of concerns raised by the Traverse City Munson Nurses Association (TCMNA).

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer has ordered most of the state to stay home in an effort to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. But what does that mean for those who don't have a home? We hear about the challenges facing the state's homeless shelters. Plus, a new documentary tracks the history of what is probably Michigan’s most famous alternative high school, sometimes cheekily referred to as "Commie High." 

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

 

On Monday, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed an executive order mandating people stay in their homes.

People who work in hospitals, pharmacies and grocery stores and who provide other essential services are excempt.

 

To help exempt workers do their jobs, Whitmer asked northern Michigan educators to coordinate child care services and make emergency daycare centers available if needed.

 

Interlochen Center for the Arts graphic

The Health Department of Northwest Michigan is telling recent visitors to Bennethum's Northern Inn in Gaylord that they may have been exposed to the coronavirus.

A patient who has since tested positive for the disease spent time there on two recent occasions.

In a press release, the department said anyone who attended performances of the band Neshama at Bennethum's may have had "significant exposure" to COVID-19. Neshama peformed once on March 12 from 5 to 8 p.m. and again on March 14 from 8 to 10:30 p.m.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer announced a "stay at home" order during an 11 a.m. press conference Monday as an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. The order goes into effect at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday morning, and will remain in place for at least the next three weeks.

Employees for Anthony's Outdoor Services build a 400' long seawall in Manistee. Anthony Ganss, the owner, says they've been busy all winter constructing seawalls.
Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

Update 3/25/20, 3:30pm: Due to the coronavirus pandemic, on Monday, March 23, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer announced temporary requirements “to suspend activities that are not necessary to sustain or protect life” through April 13, 2020. Under that order, limited forms of construction are still permissible, including projects necessary “to maintain and improve the safety, sanitation, and essential operations of residences.” A spokesman for the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy says whether or not that includes shoreline construction “is dependent on the purpose and necessity of the shoreline work, and is case-specific.” He says contractors, their legal counsel and homeowners need to make that determination and if they are still unsure, contact the Governor’s office for more clarity.

 

At a time when many Michigan companies are slowing down due to the coronavirus pandemic, business is booming for contractors working along Lake Michigan’s shoreline.

 

They’re fighting a different crisis — trying to save people’s homes from extremely high water levels. But with so much demand, there’s little to stop unqualified contractors from jumping in on the action.


At this unusual moment in history there is an interesting array of celestial phenomena populating the morning sky and stirring the thought life.

CDC

Leelanau residents are getting phone calls telling them they’re selected for free COVID-19 testing, asking them for personal information.

The caller ID reads as a Leelanau number and looks safe to answer, but it’s not, says County Administrator Chet Janik.

 

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