News

Today on Stateside, a lack of legal banking options in the marijuana industry means that many businesses are operating solely in cash—creating significant safety risks and limiting the industry's growth. Plus, a Michigan Supreme Court case is testing how much money the government can collect from tax-delinquent homeowners. 

ANNETTE ELIZABETH ALLEN / NPR

The Senate is holding a trial on the impeachment of President Trump, who is accused by the U.S. House of abusing his power and obstructing Congress.

Today on Stateside, we step back in time to the summer of 1963, to hear how Martin Luther King Junior set the stage in Detroit for the March on Washington later that year. Plus, we go over this year's list of Michigan Notable Books, which includes everything from new fiction to gripping history.

It’s the third full week of January, and though we are one month past Winter Solstice and the sunlight is growing stronger each day, statistics show that this is the time of year when we actually experience the coldest temperatures.

Rick Pluta

Federal prosecutors say they will pursue a retrial in the case of a state legislator accused of soliciting a bribe and attempted extortion.

State Rep. Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg) allegedly tried to get campaign contributions in exchange for changing his vote on legislation to repeal the state’s “prevailing wage” law.

A jury couldn’t reach a verdict on the bribery and extortion charges in December. The jury found Inman not guilty on a third charge of lying to an FBI agent.

Kaye LaFond / Interlochen Public Radio

Rivers all over the world have the same problem — fish can’t swim up them because of dams.

 

Fisheries biologists want to see if they can leave dams in place but allow certain fish to pass, but it’s complicated and the idea has created controversy in Traverse City. 

Earlier this week, the owners of Horizon Books in Traverse City, announced the store would be closing sometime this year.
Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

Horizon Books in Traverse City is closing. The iconic bookstore has been a popular gathering place on Front Street for almost 60 years.

 

Today on Stateside, it’s been four years since the state announced a criminal investigation into the Flint water crisis. We talked to two journalists who covered the crisis about lessons learned on government accountability and public health. Plus, the state of Michigan files suit against some of the biggest names in corporate America over PFAS contamination. We'll hear about how a similar case played out in Minnesota. 

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) announced Tuesday that they are revoking tariffs on Turkish dried tart cherry producers.

Huron Manistee National Forests

 

A firefighter from northern Michigan is helping battle wildfires in Australia.

 

Huron-Manistee National Forests employee Brian Stearns was hand-picked by the U.S. Forest Service for his leadership and firefighting experience.

 

 

 

 

 

Today on Stateside, we take a deeper look at how property tax foreclosures in Detroit created a pileup of city-owned properties, and left residents to care for the most desolate blocks. Plus, a Michigan photographer captures a whole year of sunrises in the Upper Peninsula. 

Kaye LaFond / Interlochen Public Radio

The state of Michigan is asking Enbridge Energy for more information about its oil and natural gas liquids pipeline that runs through the Straits of Mackinac.

Today on Stateside, an investigation finds the city Detroit overcharged tens of thousands of homeowners for property taxes. What recourse is there for people who lost their homes as a result? We'll talk to the reporters who broke the story. Also, how the polls misread voters in 2016 – especially ones without a party affiliation.

In ancient astrological wisdom, the influence of Venus and Mars on lovers was considered strongest when they were square to or opposite one another in the sky, and this month they’re setting up for just such a configuration.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Updated 01/10/2020 at 5:22 p.m.

The recall effort against State Rep. Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg) is officially over. 

The Michigan Secretary of State's office found that the group behind the recall fell 208 signatures short of the 12,201 they needed to trigger a recall election.

It’s a New Year and Michigan Radio has added a new voice. April Baer is the host of Stateside. She joined Doug Tribou on Morning Edition to talk about her Midwest roots and her path to Michigan Radio.

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, we talk to the publisher of the Glen Arbor Sun about a proposed housing development near Crystal Lake. Also, a man lost nearly 80 pounds on a plant-based diet. 

 

Plus, kids now have access to STEM learning at regional libraries. 

 

Today on Stateside, a new campaign wants to add protections for LGBTQ people to the state's existing civil rights law. Plus, a conversation with a Detroit-born author and Instagram influencer who wants to challenge stereotypes about fat, black, and Muslim women. 

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

International refugees can continue resettlement in Grand Traverse County through the federal government, according to a unanimous vote of the county board of commissioners Wednesday morning.

Flicker

Cell phones throughout the region let out a siren noise mid-morning Tuesday.

That’s because the National Weather Service added a new weather category to its alert system for snow squalls.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

The group behind the recall effort to remove Rep. Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg) from office got some breathing room Tuesday.

Michigan Secretary of State

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson is considering adding a third option so people don't have to identify as either male or female on their driver's licenses.

Today on Stateside, we welcome new host April Baer. She jumps right into things by chatting with Senator Gary Peters, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Homeland Security Committee, about the current situation developing in Iran and whether or not there is an "imminent threat" to American lives, as the Trump administration has claimed. Plus, it appears to be the Dark Ages of Detroit sports. What will it take to turn them around? 

Community colleges across the state are starting the new year with a new program to help relieve economic instability among students. 

Officials said access to basic needs like food, housing and transportation are issues that can affect student success and even student retention. 

The Michigan Building Economic Stability Today (MI-Best) initiative has $442,000 in grant funding to help eliminate barriers for students.

Flicker

Students at Gaylord Community Schools may be seeing new vehicles at the bus stop in 2020. The district is home to Michigan’s first electric school buses. 

Officials said a state grant allowed the school district to buy two brand-new electric school buses that normally cost $342,000 for only $83,000.

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