gun control

Governor Gretchen Whitmer says she would support a “red flag” law to allow law enforcement to seize firearms from someone who is deemed a risk.

Gun violence in the United States is a public health problem – and it needs to be treated that way. That’s according to Dr. Rebecca Cunningham, the Director of the Injury Prevention Center at the University of Michigan.

Today on Stateside, how should Congress respond in the aftermath of two mass shootings this weekend that left more than 30 people dead in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio? Plus, with the controversy surrounding CTE and other brain damage in professional football players, should parents be worried about their kid's safety in the sport? 

Today on Stateside, the co-sponsor of a gun safety bill introduced in the Michigan House explains what his proposed legislation would do to address gun violence. Plus, how a Grand Rapids conference is helping people love and accept their bodies exactly as they are. 

UPDATED Weds., March 14, with comment from Rep. Jack Bergman.

Several northern Michigan high schools plan to take part in Wednesday morning’s national walkout. Organizers say the walkout is meant to honor the victims of last month’s school shooting in Parkland, Florida – and to call for stricter gun laws.

Senior Jade Ebel organized the walkout at Reed City High School. Ebel says she was motivated to organize a walkout after a recent campus shooting at Central Michigan University.

The Trump administration has rolled out its plan to respond to violence and guns in our schools. It wants to provide firearms training to some teachers. But it has backed off on making major changes to gun legislation: For example, there’s nothing about raising the minimum age to buy guns from 18 to 21.

High schoolers, lawmakers, and concerned citizens held a rally at the state Capitol Thursday for changes to the state’s gun laws.

The rally comes the week after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 17 students and staff members were killed.

Participants called for a ban on assault rifles, stricter background checks before buying a gun, and more money for mental health services. But most of all, the high school students at the rally want to feel safe in their schools.

After 17 students were killed in a Florida school last week, some high school students in Kalamazoo decided they needed to do something.

Under the banner of “Students Fighting Guns Since Adults Won’t,” eight students drafted a petition and put it up on Change.org, a popular petition website.

The State Board of Education can’t agree on what to do about recent gun legislation.

There are four Democrats and four Republicans on the board, and there must be five “yes” votes in order for any measure to pass. With the partisan gridlock, the board currently can’t come to an agreement on a public position on bills that loosen restrictions on guns in schools.

Bills that recently passed in the state Senate would, among other things, require schools to allow people with a special permit to carry concealed weapons on school grounds.

PKAY CHELLE / FLICKR

In the wake of another mass shooting, the state Legislature took up bills to expand the state’s concealed carry laws.

Legislation would let people who get a special license carry a concealed weapon in places where they’re currently banned: places like schools and day cares.

Some Democrats in the Legislature are calling for a law that would allow authorities to seize the firearms of people who threaten to commit suicide or hurt others.

State Representative Robert Wittenberg (D- Oak Park) sponsored a bill that would allow a judge to issue an “extreme risk protection order.” The order would have to requested by a family member or a law enforcement official. And it could last no more than a year.

Gun rights are up for debate in the state legislature again.

A set of bills to get rid of a permit requirement to carry a concealed pistol was up in front of a House committee Tuesday.

Advocates say the legislation is long overdue and the legislation wouldn’t take away the regulations on who can carry a firearm.

But opponents say it erodes gun safety.

A new bill would allow gun owners to carry a concealed pistol without a permit from the state.  Right now, gun owners have to get a concealed pistol license, which requires taking a gun safety class among other things.

The "constitutional carry" bill is already law in 13 states.

Rep. Triston Cole (R-Mancelona) is one of the bill’s sponsors. He calls it a “freedom issue,” saying law-abiding gun owners shouldn’t need a permit to carry a concealed handgun.

Aaron Selbig

The number of women applying to carry a concealed weapon in Michigan has more than doubled since 2010. And in northern counties like Manistee and Grand Traverse, the numbers are even higher.

Linda Moleski is one of them. Moleski has her Concealed Pistol License and usually carries her Glock 26 nine-millimeter pistol. She can often be found at Shooters gun range in Traverse City, a shop that makes a point to be welcoming to women.

Jake Neher

Gov. Rick Snyder is renewing his support for banning openly carrying firearms in Michigan schools.

Right now, people with concealed pistol licenses can legally openly carry in schools. But they cannot carry weapons that are concealed.

  Snyder says banning open carry in schools is something he and lawmakers are discussing.

“I would imagine there’ll probably be ongoing discussion,” he said. “Because, again, open carry in Michigan schools is not a good thing. And most states don’t allow it.”

Earlier this month, we spoke with gun instructor Rick Ector about the increase in the number of women in Michigan with concealed pistol licenses, or CPLs.

Kristen Moore of the Michigan Chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America wanted to continue the conversation by exploring the role that firearms play in violence against women.

Governor Snyder is facing increasing pressure to veto legislation that would let some people who have personal protection orders against them carry a concealed weapon.

Democratic Congresswoman Debbie Dingell has written a letter to Snyder urging him not to sign it.

Dingell joined us today from Washington D.C.

Governor Rick Snyder has vetoed legislation that would have relaxed restrictions on guns that use air-power to shoot pellets, BBs, paintballs, and other projectiles.

The legislation was supported by the NRA and gun rights groups, but opposed by many local government officials who would have lost a lot of authority to regulate air guns within their borders.

The NRA says Michigan is one of only four states that classify air guns as firearms.