Red Pine Radio

Red Pine Radio is a group of community members who are learning to make their own radio stories. This community workshop is sponsored by Interlochen Public Radio. 

If you're interested in learning more about Red Pine Radio, please contact redpineradio@interlochen.org.  

Field Guide: Dog stinkhorn

Oct 9, 2020
Cheryl Bartz

Mushrooms and fungi are coming up thanks to rain and cooler temperatures. Many are not safe to eat, but there's one fungus you will never be tempted to eat. In fact, if the wind is right, it will have you checking the bottoms of your shoes. 

 

Dog stinkhorn looks like an upside-down carrot with brown glop on the top. There’s a reason for that stench. The brown goo is made of spores and it smells to attract flies. The spores stick to flies that then spread the fungus.

 

 

Field Guide: Mystery holes

Oct 1, 2020
Cheryl Bartz

As the weather gets colder, vegetation dies back and reveals holes in the ground.  Big or tiny, you might wonder what made the hole?

 

Cheryl Bartz, a producer for Red Pine Radio, recently staked out a new hole that appeared in her garden.  It was perfectly round and about a half inch in diameter.  The rim of the hole appeared to be reinforced with grass and wood fibers. The resident of the hole was elusive, but eventually she snagged a photo of a wolf spider. 

 

Field Guide: It's not the goldenrod

Sep 17, 2020
Cheryl Bartz

Cheryl Gross says a common misconception is “beautiful yellow goldenrod flowers” are the cause seasonal allergies. 

“They’re not,” says the president of Plant it Wild.

 

Gross says the real culprit is ragweed.  

 

It blooms at the same time as goldenrod, but isn’t very noticeable. It’s dull green with tiny dull green flowers.  

 

Ragweed doesn’t need to be flashy because it doesn’t need to attract insects. 

 

Ellie Harold’s migration inspired art installation, “Birds Fly In: A Human Refuge,” is on display at the Oliver Art Center in Frankfort through Sept. 11, 2020.
Diane Frederick

In 2017, artist Ellie Harold was stuck in traffic in Atlanta. There was road rage all around her, and she started feeling it bubble up inside of her too. She asked herself, “Wouldn’t it be great if people could just have a place to go for a time out?”


Pandemic Stories: Tourism in spring 2020

Jun 25, 2020
Courtesy Wilderness Canoe Trips

Opening a canoe livery was challenging this year. The pandemic and then flooding rains kept these businesses on edge. Just before Memorial Day weekend, Stewart McFerran, from Red Pine Radio, checked in with Roger Zak, who runs Wilderness Canoe Trips on the Manistee River. He said his phone had been ringing off the hook.

 

Megan Madion

More than a decade ago, Megan Madion had a severe bike crash that shattered her pelvis. To get moving again, she developed a workout, called Modus. Greek for “the method,” the workout philosophy is: a well functioning core and glutes are the foundation for healthy total body movement.  Since then, she’s opened the gym Modus 45 in Traverse City, hired instructors and grown a loyal following. 

Pandemic Stories: Racing the coronavirus

Jun 17, 2020
Kris Kruid

Kris Kruid was halfway across the world and had to race the coronavirus to get back to her home in Honor.  Borders were slamming shut behind her. She was in 13 airports in 8 days.  She told her story to Red Pine Radio producer Cheryl Bartz.

“I was in Botswana on a trip we’d been planning for a year to go on safari and then go see the great apes," she recalls. "Then my traveling companion turned on her phone and saw the news about borders closing. So then we had to get out.  South Africa was closing, and Kenya had already closed."

Pandemic Stories: New York dream deferred

Jun 11, 2020
Courtesy of Analise Buhr

Analise Buhr dreamed of studying fashion design in New York and moved to the city near the end of 2019 to pursue her dream.

All of that was swept away in a day due to coronavirus.

 

“I was working in Manhattan in ABC Kitchen, that’s a Jean George Restaurant in the City,” Buhr said. “They closed on March 14th.”

 

She had to decide quickly what to do.

 

Pandemic Stories: Coming home from India

Jun 11, 2020
Heather Aldridge

When the world   started to shut down in mid-March, Heather Aldridge was in India helping her friend Mohit Shukla feed the poor. She didn’t think much about a pandemic, until she was in a packed overnight train without much circulation.

“It started to dawn on me; oh, this could be a concern,”  Aldridge said.

 

She started looking for flights home, but everything was booked. Then India mandated a national lockdown.

 

The 'Silver Fox' of fencing

Apr 13, 2020
Leslie Hamp

It’s a Sunday in early March, and Julia Kline slips into her fencing gear at Three Swords Fencing in Traverse City. The 56-year-old with spiked graying hair warms up, bouncing like a boxer and jabbing a target box with her sword. 

Before the coronavirus outbreak, she spent every Sunday at the fencing club.


Courtesy

In September 1999, Kenneth Stearns was riding his motorcycle through Meriden, Kansas, when a truck pulled out in front of him.  

“All I remember on the accident is the truck when he pulled out in front of me, and I had to brake and turn, and as soon as I braked, I lost everything," he says. "I don’t remember anything after that.”

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, we talk to the publisher of the Glen Arbor Sun about a proposed housing development near Crystal Lake. Also, a man lost nearly 80 pounds on a plant-based diet. 

 

Plus, kids now have access to STEM learning at regional libraries. 

 

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

 

This week on Points North, we have inspiration for your New Year’s resolutions with stories about fresh starts and big life changes.

 


 

Golam Rabbani was a human rights lawyer until he was forced to flee Bangladesh for opposing the government. He and his family made their way to Traverse City by way of New York and Port Huron. 

Elberta baby born above a bar becomes a local legend

Dec 19, 2019
Gretchen Carr / Red Pine Radio

Frederik Stig-Nielsen and his wife Betsy Mas had their first child in their apartment above the Cabbage Shed, a popular restaurant and tavern in Elberta. 


Complaint about church bells in Arcadia raises commotion

Oct 14, 2019
Stewart McFerran

Yard signs are popping up throughout the village of Arcadia that say: “Save the Arcadia Bells.” The bells of Trinity Lutheran Church ring every hour from 7 in the morning until 10 at night. A request to reduce the noise raised an outcry in the Manistee County community.  

 


Fred Keeslar

Many diseases are virtually nonexistent in America today because of vaccinations. They still generate controversy because some parents choose to not vaccinate their children. Supporters of vaccines say if people knew how horrible these illnesses are, they would be less inclined to get waivers and risk new epidemics. 

There’s a gravestone in Benzie County that tells the story of one of these diseases.


Courtesy of The Benzie Record Patriot

Hundreds of runners will compete in the Crystal Lake Team Marathon this weekend. The race was started nearly 40 years ago by the late Benzie Central Coach, Eldon “Peter” Moss.  

He was the backbone of the Benzie Central track and cross-country legacy, winning eight state championships and numerous state and national coaching honors. 

This will be the first year that he will not be present to fire the gun at the start of the race. He passed away this spring, and will always be known for changing the lives of those he coached. 

Volunteers count frogs for annual DNR survey

Jun 13, 2019
Creative Commons

Frogs and toads are highly sensitive to habitat degradation, and that makes them a good barometer for environmental health.

Every year volunteers from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources do a listening survey to determine which species of frogs and toads are present and how abundant they are.

 

Volunteer Kathy Gray's survey route is on Old Mission Peninsula.

“Well, I do love the toads. I love the trilling toads," Gray says.

 

Leslie Hamp

At a time when many their age have retired, three northern Michigan artists are reuniting for a multimedia exhibit. They were the stars of the art department at Traverse City Central High School 50 years ago. Now they're getting back together and seeing each other in a whole new light.


Lenten fish fry feeds spirit of camaraderie

Apr 17, 2019
Fred Keeslar

The season of Lent ends for many Christians this week. Lent is the 40 days leading up to Easter. For Catholics, Lent means abstaining from many things, including meat on Fridays.

In northern Michigan, some local churches host fish fries on Fridays.  

Coyotes survive Michigan winters. Could your dog?

Apr 2, 2019
Cheryl Bartz

Coyotes have an unmistakable howl that you’ll be hearing more and more as the weather warms up. They might have been quiet during the winter, but they weren’t hibernating. They can survive even a polar vortex. 

Domestic dogs share DNA with coyotes. That inspired Cheryl Bartz of Red Pine Radio to investigate whether dogs could also make it through a winter outside. 

Gretchen Carr / Interlochen Public Radio

For northern Michigan artists, getting in to the annual Regional Exhibit at Traverse City’s Dennos Museum Center is a big deal. But not everyone is accepted to the juried show.

Artists deal with rejection all the time, but this year the artists who were not admitted got together and created a show of their own.

 


Meet a longtime ski groomer at Crystal Mountain

Mar 15, 2019
Cheryl Bartz

After skiers and snowboarders leave at the end of the day, mountain manager Mike Cutler and his team of groomers take over the slopes at Crystal Mountain Resort.  They work all night to prepare downhill runs for the guests who will show up the next day anticipating perfect corduroy – that's the pattern left by the grooming machines. Weather and snow conditions keep the groomers on their toes.  Mike Cutler says that’s what keeps it interesting.


George Sundin / Michigan State University

This week on Points North, a bacteria called cherry canker is attacking sweet cherry trees nationwide, but one Michigan scientist is developing a solution. Plus, how a new bill could help tart cherry farmers compete with cheap Turkish cherry imports.


TC skier finds healing on the trails

Feb 8, 2019
Roger Hagerman

Many of the best cross-country skiers in Michigan will line up in Traverse City this weekend for the 43rd annual North American Vasa ski races.

One of those skiers is local resident Anders Gillis, who won the 34-kilometer classic race last year. 

Anders was not always in shape for a ski marathon. After a personal tragedy, the lifelong athlete fell into depression and put on significant weight. 


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