Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside, Michigan’s healthcare system is facing major staffing challenges, as exhausted, under-equipped nurses consider their options. Plus, we take a deeper look at the longstanding health inequities fueling the disproportionate impact COVID-19 is having on African Americans. 

Today on Stateside, the Michigan Legislature convened in Lansing today, but some lawmakers question the safety of meeting in person. We hear from one of them, and talk about what lawmaking looks like in the middle of a pandemic. Plus, how plasma donated by people who have recovered from COVID-19 could protect health care workers on the front lines of the pandemic.

Today on Stateside, families advocate for their loved ones isolated in hospitals amidst the COVID-19 crisis. Beaumont Health representative Kelly Parent weighs in on the communication options available between hospital staff and families unable to be present at their loved ones’ bedsides. Plus, how to maintain your mental health while you’re at home.

Today on Stateside, we talk to Dr. Mona Hanna Attisha, who tested positive for COVID-19. Plus, we talk to children who just found out the rest of their school year is cancelled.

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Today on Stateside, we talk to Democratic Congresswoman Debbie Dingell about the rapid rise in COVID-19 cases in Southeast Michigan, and how the outbreak is shifting the tone of partisan politics in Washington. We'll also hear about what impact ending the school year early could have on the state's most vulnerable students. 

Today on Stateside, we talk to Democratic Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin about her call for a more coordinated national response to the spread of COVID-19. Plus, we talk to the author of a novel, based on a true story, about a young teacher living alone in the Upper Peninsula during the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic.

Today on Stateside, it's hard to keep up with the daily rush of news about COVID-19 in Michigan. We talk with two reporters about some stories you might have missed.  Plus, writer Desiree Cooper offers perspective and advice about coping with uncertainty and loss. 

Today on Stateside, people in Detroit are getting hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, and hospitals are worried about a surge in patients overwhelming the city’s health care providers. Plus, as most other businesses shut down during the state's “stay at home” order, grocery stores are still open. We’ll hear what it’s like to be one of the workers at those stores.

Today on Stateside, we examine the domino effect the COVID-19 lockdown is having on the residential rental market—from renters, to landlords, to lenders. Plus, the superintendent of Detroit Public Schools Community District says the state should end the school year now, and focus on getting districts the support they need to shift to online learning. 

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer has ordered most of the state to stay home in an effort to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. But what does that mean for those who don't have a home? We hear about the challenges facing the state's homeless shelters. Plus, a new documentary tracks the history of what is probably Michigan’s most famous alternative high school, sometimes cheekily referred to as "Commie High." 

Today on Stateside, an Ann Arbor bookstore is racing to come up with a way to do business online after the coronavirus pandemic forced it to close its storefront. Plus, Michigan’s Teacher of the Year gives advice on how to teach kids from home.

Today on Stateside, the Big Three auto companies have wound down production at their plants over worries about the spread of the novel coronavirus. Plus, how Michigan musicians are dealing with canceled concerts and connecting with their fans in the age of social distancing. 

Today on Stateside, we spoke with U.S. Senator Gary Peters about how Congress is responding to the COVID-19 outbreak. We also checked in on Lansing, where Michigan lawmakers have approved large sums of money to deal with the fallout from a statewide coronavirus shutdown, even as bigger policy questions linger.

Today on Stateside, St. Patrick's Day arrives just in time to find bars and restaurants closed to revelers because of the coronavirus outbreak. What does that mean for the state's small businesses? Plus, we discuss the philanthropic efforts to meet Michiganders' needs during a prolonged period of social distancing.

Today on Stateside, we checked in with two school districts about how they are planning to meet the needs of students during an unprecedented shutdown prompted by the coronavirus outbreak. Plus, the pediatrician who alerted the world to Flint’s water crisis talked to us about how kids in the city are doing more than five years after the crisis began. 

Today on Stateside, the Big Three auto companies are rolling back operations in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. What does that mean for the state's economy? Plus, we talk to faith leaders about how they are guiding their congregants during the uncertainty of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Today on Stateside, the COVID-19 conundrum facing Michigan's courts. What's the best way to protect defendants, jury, and staff without the wheels of justice grinding to a halt? Plus, one writer considers what we can learn from Amish communities' cautious, considered use of technology.

Today on Stateside, Michigan has its first state confirmed cases of COVID-19 illness. What sort of social disruptions will we face as more cases appear in our state? Plus, results from yesterday’s presidential primary—and what they tell us about the November election. 

Today on Stateside, people around the state are casting their votes in the presidential primary and for more than 200 local ballot initiatives. We'll hear about turnout and tabulation, and what makes a teenager want to work a 13-hour day at the polls. Plus, we talk to the Michigan's chief medical officer about the state's capacity to test people for COVID-19. 

Today on Stateside, Democratic front-runners in the presidential primary are making their final pitch to Michigan voters. We spoke to Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, and heard about former Vice President Joe Biden's message to voters in Grand Rapids. Plus, the city of Detroit will restore water to thousands of households because of fears about the spread of COVID-19. 

Today on Stateside, as the remaining presidential contenders make for Michigan, can Bernie Sanders repeat his success of 2016 in Tuesday’s primary? Or will Joe Biden close the sale with voters he's connected with in the past? Plus, a renewal millage to fund the Detroit Institute of Arts is on the ballot in three counties. Some Detroit residents think the museum has taken attention away from more pressing challenges in the city.

Today on Stateside, former United Auto Workers president Gary Jones has been charged with embezzlement. What does this mean for the future of the union and its members? Plus, Senator Elizabeth Warren has dropped out of the presidential race days before the Michigan primary. Many supporters say they are dismayed, but not surprised, that Warren never caught on with more voters.

Today on Stateside, a federal judge has invalidated Michigan's Medicaid work requirements. Republican leaders in the state Legislature are already pushing back. What does this mean for the more than 200,000 people in the state subject to those requirements? Plus, we'll talk about how the Democratic candidates for president stack up when it comes to addressing the concerns of black voters.

Today on Stateside, as Super Tuesday results roll in, Michigan voters wait on the sidelines and watch their candidate choices dwindle. Plus, we take a look at Mike Bloomberg’s massive campaign spending efforts in Michigan.

Today on Stateside, an activist group wants to convince voters to change Michigan’s constitution in order to restructure income taxes. Plus, how environmental issues affecting the Great Lakes region stack up among the Democratic presidential candidates.

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