Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside, the state and Michigan’s counties try to get on the same page, tracking who’s getting vaccinated by race. Also, naming the violence - and the fear - Asian Americans are living with during the pandemic. Plus, a snapshot of what college life is like during this pandemic year. 

Today on Stateside, Congresswoman Debra Haaland (D-NM) begins Senate confirmation hearings as President Joe Biden’s pick to head the U.S. Department of the Interior. A Michigan tribal chair discusses what Native leadership in the Cabinet could mean for tribes, going forward. Also, the new head of Michigan’s Department of Health and Human Services weighs in on the next pandemic battlegrounds. Plus, reimagining Idlewild, where generations of Black Michiganders went for vacation and respite.

Michigan has had quite an irruption this winter. We’re not talking lava, but rather an irruption of birds. It’s been a great year for winter birding because of this irruption and Michigan Audubon education coordinator Lindsay Cain explained that an irruption is when northern wintering birds come down south for winter because they’re not finding enough food. 

“They're moving to find food for the winter, which is a really great experience for a lot of birders because we're seeing a lot of things that we wouldn't normally see over the winter,” Cain said.

Today on Stateside, confusion and frustration among Ann Arbor parents over the decision on whether to reopen schools. Plus, a look into the history and future of public spaces centered around Detroit's Black residents. And, if you’re starting to feel a little cooped up, may we recommend some winter bird watching?

Today, on Stateside, why getting schools on board to reopen has not been easy in some of the state’s larger districts. Plus, metro Detroit teens learn entrepreneurship and activism through social justice fashion design.

 

Michiganders have a lot on their minds these days. But one of the most pressing issues we’re all wondering about is the COVID-19 vaccine. Today on Stateside, we answer your questions about the vaccination process, with help from some professionals in the know.

Today on Stateside, frustrated Michiganders try to navigate an unemployment system overwhelmed by pandemic job losses. Plus, a Detroit festival celebrates the food of the African diaspora.

Today on Stateside, the head of Detroit’s health department expresses tentative optimism about the current stage in the city’s battle against COVID-19. Plus, visions of Afrofuturism as seen in American comics. And, what homeschooling has to offer for Black families during—and after—the pandemic.

Today, on Stateside, we talked with photographer Leni Sinclair about her years of political involvement and her stunning photos of Detroit’s stages and people. Also, how Detroit leveraged help from a large and well-funded partner to coordinate its massive effort to vaccinate residents. 

Today, on Stateside, a new state budget paves the way into another uncertain year. Also, a discussion about how undocumented immigrants have been shut out of federal aid during the pandemic.

Today on Stateside, a firsthand look at one Detroit family’s vaccine experience. Plus, a new short film takes on Detroit’s Motown past and the artists shaping its future. And, how Michigan’s GOP leaders are grappling the state’s growing militia movement.

Ice, ice everywhere, and no where you should walk. This past weekend was particularly cold in much of the Great Lake state, and while it may be tempting to go explore the frozen lakescapes, it can be very dangerous.

Dave Benjamin is the Executive Director of the Great Lakes Surf Rescue Project, a nonprofit that focuses on safety around open water. According to Benjamin, 2020 was the deadliest year on Lake Michigan since his group started to keep track in 2010. He urged people to be cautious when visiting the Great Lakes during winter.

Today on Stateside, Michigan has reached over one million COVID-19 vaccinations. We explore what this milestone means, and the work ahead. Plus, the pandemic cancels another event. This time it’s sled dog race. And, as the virus ripped through the country, misinformation tore through a small U.P. town.

Today on Stateside, Michigan restaurants and diners face the re-opening of indoor dining. Plus, an etiquette guide to the first Super Bowl in the pandemic. And, a look at Michigan’s role as a bootlegging hub during Prohibition.

Today on Stateside, a collision in Grand Traverse County between the region’s gun culture, and a growing awareness of how firearms inform public debate. Also, how Michigan’s winter recreational culture is weathering a warmer climate.

The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is underway as the Senate begins to set parameters for the proceeding. This is the first time a president will undergo a Senate trial twice, and although Trump is no longer in office, the trial will continue.

Today on Stateside, how the new COVID variant, present on the University of Michigan campus, is affecting the school and what it could mean for the rest of the state And, shelters in Grand Rapids are seeing an increase in the demand for services as the economic fallout from COVID pushes people out of housing. Plus, how new guidelines for vaccine priority have cut off much of the supply of doses for the Upper Peninsula.

Today on Stateside, a pro-business advocacy group says the insurrection and denial of election results will fundamentally change how they make political endorsements. Plus, we talk with acclaimed actor and musician Jeff Daniels about writing songs during COVID. And, a conversation with former Detroit Mayor and NBA legend Dave Bing.

Today on Stateside, after the Capitol insurrection on January 6, some immigrants are feeling unsettled by the kind of political instability they once fled. Plus, we’ll take a look at the role a UAW leader played in tying organized labor to a broader movement for civil rights. And, could COVID-19 sideline college basketball tournaments… again?

Today on Stateside, it’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day. We spoke with a historian about King’s work in Detroit and the legacy it's left behind. Plus, a conversation about the parallels between the civil rights movement of King's era and the continued fight for racial justice today. 

Today on Stateside, Governor Rick Snyder and several people in his administration face criminal charges for their parts in the Flint water crisis. Plus, the Detroit Free Press profiles a central figure in the alleged plot to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

Today on Stateside, Governor Whitmer said last week she is hoping schools will be able to reopen in-person classes by March. She also announced that K- 12 school teachers are among the groups who can get the COVID-19 vaccinations. We talk about how that process will begin. And, we continue our look at Betsy Devos' legacy after her resignation from her position as Secreatary of Education. Plus, we’ll discuss yesterday’s news that former Governor Rick Snyder, his health director and other ex-officials have been told they’re being charged after a new investigation of the Flint water crisis.

Today on Stateside, U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow talks about why she’s joining the calls for President Donald Trump’s removal from office. Also, a historical perspective on the transfer of presidential power — and why the one that’s happening right now is abnormal. Plus, a look at the legacy of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who’s resigning weeks before President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration.

Today on Stateside, old tensions between Governor Whitmer and state legislative leaders flared during the lame-duck session. Plus, a conversation with the author of the satirical novel The Great American Cheese War about its eerie parallels with some of 2020’s biggest stories. And, we talk more about the vaccines and how distribution is going in Michigan. 

Today on Stateside, we talked with Politico correspondent Tim Alberta about the rift in the GOP over President Donald Trump's baseless claims of election fraud. Plus, two Michigan Radio reporters who’ve covered COVID-19 talk about the future of the pandemic as we enter a new year.

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