Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside, we talk to the head of Enbridge's tunnel project about what's happening with Line 5. Plus, a conversation with the Detroit-based metal band I Prevail, which is nominated for two Grammy Awards this year.

Today on Stateside, a lack of legal banking options in the marijuana industry means that many businesses are operating solely in cash—creating significant safety risks and limiting the industry's growth. Plus, a Michigan Supreme Court case is testing how much money the government can collect from tax-delinquent homeowners. 

Today on Stateside, we step back in time to the summer of 1963, to hear how Martin Luther King Junior set the stage in Detroit for the March on Washington later that year. Plus, we go over this year's list of Michigan Notable Books, which includes everything from new fiction to gripping history.

Today on Stateside, what the story about a state senator's alleged sexual harassment of a female journalist says about Capitol culture. Plus, a look at where Michigan's recyclables are going, two years after China stopped accepting U.S. waste.

Today on Stateside, a Democratic congressman is proposing new regulations for safe disposal of PFAS. Plus, schools around the state are increasingly relying on long-term substitute teachers. We talk about what this means for students, and strategies for getting more certified teachers into classrooms.

Today on Stateside, it’s been four years since the state announced a criminal investigation into the Flint water crisis. We talked to two journalists who covered the crisis about lessons learned on government accountability and public health. Plus, the state of Michigan files suit against some of the biggest names in corporate America over PFAS contamination. We'll hear about how a similar case played out in Minnesota. 

Today on Stateside, we take a deeper look at how property tax foreclosures in Detroit created a pileup of city-owned properties, and left residents to care for the most desolate blocks. Plus, a Michigan photographer captures a whole year of sunrises in the Upper Peninsula. 

For many of us, it is more pleasurable to look at pictures of beautiful sunrises than to get up and actually see beautiful sunrises.

Today on Stateside, an investigation finds the city Detroit overcharged tens of thousands of homeowners for property taxes. What recourse is there for people who lost their homes as a result? We'll talk to the reporters who broke the story. Also, how the polls misread voters in 2016 – especially ones without a party affiliation.

Today on Stateside, economists forecast how much money the state of Michigan will bring in and what it will need to spend in the coming year. Plus, some Michigan reads to curl up with when you’re stuck inside during this weekend’s winter storm.

Today on Stateside, the U.S. House of Representatives approved a resolution Thursday to limit President Donald Trump's ability to take further military action against Iran. We talk to the congresswoman sponsoring the measure. Plus, the head of a Dearborn seminary talks about educating the next generation of Muslim faith leaders. 

Today on Stateside, a new campaign wants to add protections for LGBTQ people to the state's existing civil rights law. Plus, a conversation with a Detroit-born author and Instagram influencer who wants to challenge stereotypes about fat, black, and Muslim women. 

Today on Stateside, we spoke with Congressman Fred Upton (R-MI 6) about escalating tensions with Iran after the assassination of one of that country’s top generals. Plus, the economic lessons from the United Automobile Workers union’s strike against General Motors last year. 

Today on Stateside, we welcome new host April Baer. She jumps right into things by chatting with Senator Gary Peters, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Homeland Security Committee, about the current situation developing in Iran and whether or not there is an "imminent threat" to American lives, as the Trump administration has claimed. Plus, it appears to be the Dark Ages of Detroit sports. What will it take to turn them around? 

Forty years ago, in December 1979, Jimmy Carter was president, William Milliken was Michigan's governor, and Coleman Young was the mayor of Detroit. 

The Iranian hostage crisis was in its second month. Also in that time, Cynthia Canty began her first radio job at WMUZ, a religious station in Detroit. For six mornings a week, Canty would grace Detroit's airwaves from 1 a.m. to 8 a.m.

Today on Stateside, nearly half of Detroit households can't afford to pay for pricey Internet access. But the city's director of digital inclusion plans to change that. Plus, Michigan's Republicans appear ready to take a Right To Life ballot proposal and pass it into law—completely bypassing Governor Whitmer and her promised veto.

Today on Stateside,  Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-Dearborn) explains how she’s approaching the historic impeachment vote in the House tomorrow. If the vote passes, Donald Trump will be the third president to be impeached in American history. Plus, with only two weeks left in the decade, we look back at how the last ten years have impacted our state.

Today on Stateside, we spoke with Democratic Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin, who represents Michigan's 8th District, about why she is voting to impeach President Trump. Plus, Richard Phillips served some 46 years in a Michigan prison for a murder he didn't commit, making him the longest-serving exoneree in U.S. history. We spoke with him about what life has been like since he was released from prison more than two years ago. 

Today on Stateside, we talk to Paul Mitchell, who represents Michigan’s 10th District, about his view on the impeachment proceedings against President Trump. Plus, we talk to one of the longest-serving members of the Capitol press corps about his nearly five decades covering Michigan politics.

Today on Stateside, we look at what the resignation of Wayne State University's Board of Governors chairwoman means for the school’s divided leadership. Plus, we wrap up our series on billionaire influence in Michigan with a look at Grand Rapids and a conversation with the author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World.

Today on Stateside, Detroit has hired a new director for its Animal Care and Control Department after the fatal mulling of a nine-year-old girl earlier this year. We heard how the department plans to turn things around. Plus, experts estimate that postpartum mood disorders like anxiety and depression impact as many as 1 in 5 mothers, but stigma stops many of them from getting help. We talked to two women trying to change that. 

Today on Stateside, a new investigative report revealed that top exectutives at a firm contracted by the city of Flint knew there was a problem with lead contamination in the water system, but never alerted the public. Plus, a look at the golden era of downtown department stores in Detroit, and what their eventual demise tells us about how the retail landscape has changed. 

Today on Stateside, we heard about the latest update on a lawsuit filed in 2015 on behalf of the tens of thousands of Michiganders wrongly accused of submitting fraudulent unemployment claims. Plus, the new director of the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency talked about her plan to get more of Michigan's 600,000 veterans connected to the benefits they need. 

Today on Stateside, a team from Emory University is in Michigan this week to take blood samples from people who were exposed to polybrominated biphenyls—or PBBs—in the 1970s. Plus, is new technology the key to fighting climate change—or is a radical cultural shift needed? 

Today on Stateside, an old industrial site contaminated with uranium since the World War II has partially collapsed into the Detroit River. Plus, a group of West Michigan musicians have brought old Michigan folk songs once sung by sailors and lumberjacks back to life.

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