Peter Payette

Executive Director and Interim News Director

Peter Payette is the Executive Director of Interlochen Public Radio. He was previously the station's News Director. For many years, he hosted the weekly program Points North and has reported on a wide range of issues critical to the culture and economy of northern Michigan. His work has been featured on NPR, Michigan Radio, Bridge magazine and Edible Grande Traverse. He has taught journalism and radio production to students and adults at Interlochen Center for the Arts. He is also working on a book about the use of aquaculture to manage Great Lakes fisheries, particularly the use of salmon from the Pacific Ocean to create a sport fishery in the 1960s.

Peter has vacationed in Benzie County his entire life. His wife Sarah is his biggest fan. They have three children, Isabelle, Amelia and Emmet, and live happily in Traverse City's Kid's Creek Neighborhood. 

Many of his favorite stories are about obscure fish in the Great Lakes or the new arrivals changing the food web.  He also admires the people keeping the rock 'n' roll revolution alive in the woods of northern Michigan and enjoys any story that reconnects the past to the present.

Ways to Connect

James Marvin Phelps

On the ballot this election is a proposal to change how Michigan spends the money it gets from oil and gas production.

Right now the state uses oil and gas dollars to buy and maintain public lands, and for nothing else.

 

Under Proposal 1 this program would continue in perpetuity.

Courtesy of Michael Huey

Sleeping Bear Dunes turns 50 this month. It’s a destination that brings well over a million visitors to the dunes along Lake Michigan every year

 


Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

This week, hear how high water in the Great Lakes is unearthing Native American burial sites. In some places along Lake Michigan, human remains have been discovered at the beach.

Also, more water isn’t the only reason the lakes are higher, a higher elevation that is. The Great Lakes are still rebounding from the last ice age.

 

And what’s in those holes in your garden?

 

    

 

Amanda Holmes

This week we look into why commercial fishers in the Great Lakes have been left out of federal aid for fisheries nationwide, to the tune of $300 million. (The Great Lakes got zero.)

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

This week we bring you two birds with very different reputations. 

Peter Payette

Maria San Miguel was nervous about getting a coronavirus test. 

“I was seeing on the television and the internet that there was something they were going to put up your nose really far,” she says in Spanish. 

Courtesy Bill Milliken, Jr.

When the late William Grawn Milliken first told his mother about his aspirations to serve in government, she told him to be a “statesman, not a politician.” He went on to be Michigan’s longest-serving governor, make the state a national leader in environmental policy and leave a legacy of civility and bipartisan public service.

Watch a recording of the memorial event on Facebook. 

Lexi Krupp

Interlochen Public Radio welcomes Lexi Krupp this week as our new science and conservation reporter. Lexi comes to us from Gimlet Media, where she helped the “Science Vs” podcast team distinguish what’s fact from what’s not, and has written for a range of publications including Audubon and Vice.

 

She will lead IPR’s efforts to deepen the public’s understanding of the natural world, covering the land, water, forests, climate, wildlife and farms in upper Michigan.

Dear Listeners, 
 

“Think” with host Krys Boyd from KERA in Dallas is coming to northern Michigan.
 

Every weeknight at 8:00 p.m., listeners can expect thought-provoking and in-depth conversations with newsmakers from around the globe. Since launching in November 2006, “Think” and Krys Boyd have earned more than a dozen local, regional and national awards.
 

Potential new cormorant management plan

Jun 11, 2020
Sam Corden

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has crafted a new plan to address double-crested cormorant conflicts in the US.

 

It proposes killing as many as 77,000 of the migratory birds in the Mississippi and Central flyways each year. That covers 24 states, including Michigan.  The FWS estimates the population in the region is about 500,000 migrating cormorants, which nest in Canada, the Great Lakes and other parts of the upper Midwest. 

 

Gretchen Carr

Life in northern Michigan relies on the water, land, forests and other natural wonders of the upper Great Lakes region.  IPR is committed to journalism that deepens our understanding of the natural world. That world is changing and our journalism needs to keep up. 

 

Cheryl Bartz

On the guide this week, hear how 50 degrees is a threshold for all kinds of spring activity. Also the true and false morels, feasting warblers and the salamander migration.

 

 

What are you seeing?  Call us with your nature sightings at 231-276-4444.

 

Thanks to Cheryl Bartz, Larry Mawby and Leslie Hamp for production help.

Cheryl Bartz

On the guide this week: the sky dance of woodcocks, the appetite and torpor of bats and the first spring flowering ephemerals.

 

 


Cheryl Bartz

On the guide today: how eastern chipmunks use social distancing, the danger of overharvesting ramps and the sonic power of ruffed grouse.

The video we mention, produced by the Ruffed Grouse Society, is here.

Thanks to Cheryl Bartz, Larry Mawby and Leslie Hamp for production help.

Leslie Hamp

On the audio guide today: the first butterflies of spring, nesting bald eagles and oak wilt.

Also, a good reason to put off raking up all that leafy debris in your yards. 

You can report sightings of turtles and other reptiles and amphibians to the Michigan Herp Atlas.


IPR needs your help

Apr 6, 2020

Greetings from Interlochen. 

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

Commercial fishers say a package of bills that cleared the Michigan House of Representatives last week will put them out of business. The bills would classify lake trout, walleye and perch as game fish, eliminating the option for a commercial harvest.

Reporter Dan Wanschura interviews a Lake Michigan surfer in October.
Beth Price Photography

Help northern Michigan's public radio station tell better stories and do bold new work. Interlochen Public Radio is searching for a guest producer to come work with students, community producers and station reporters.

As part of Interlochen Center for the Arts, you'll be helping one of the premiere arts organizations in the world fully embrace audio storytelling.

Interlochen Public Radio is pleased to announce that listeners can now tune in to Classical IPR at WSRJ 105.5 FM. We are glad to bring back into many homes and cars the sounds that so many listeners find synonymous with life in northern Michigan.

We are broadcasting from WSRJ 105.5 FM as a temporary solution as we await weather conditions that will allow the repair of WIAA 88.7 FM. While we recognize that this additional broadcast will not restore service for all WIAA 88.7 FM listeners, it will allow most people in the Grand Traverse region to tune in to Classical IPR.

Interlochen Public Radio

Dear Classical IPR listeners,

As many of you know, 88.7 FM has unexpectedly stopped transmitting. We are sorry for the problem which was entirely unexpected at a site we rebuilt just two years ago. Since the transmission failed on the evening of December 16, we have been working hard to get the station back up and running. We identified the issue as a malfunction in our radio tower’s antenna array, which will need to be dismantled and rebuilt by a specialized crew. Unfortunately, snow and ice have made it unsafe for our crew to climb the tower to do this work, despite several attempts. 

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

 

This week on Points North, we have inspiration for your New Year’s resolutions with stories about fresh starts and big life changes.

 


 

Golam Rabbani was a human rights lawyer until he was forced to flee Bangladesh for opposing the government. He and his family made their way to Traverse City by way of New York and Port Huron. 

Actor and international arts leader Eric Booth will be at Horizon Books in Traverse City on Tuesday, January 28 at 7 p.m. He’ll lead an open workshop on helping artists connect with audiences. 

Booth has acted on Broadway many times, taught at The Juilliard School and written seven books. He says most Americans feel like outsiders to the arts, and it is the artist’s responsibility to change that. He thinks everyone who works in the arts should have the same job title on their business cards: agent of artistic experience. 

Anne Strainchamps, host of the public radio show "To The Best Of Our Knowledge," has been asking interview subjects about their reading habits for years. She and the TTBOOK team have gathered the best of those conversations in "Bookmarks" a series of short stories of the books that have had a profound impact on writers and thinkers that you love.

Interlochen Public Radio is celebrating great books with the National Writers Series, Friends of Traverse Area District Library and Harbor Springs Festival of the Book. 

We want your help.

Jeff Smith

Interlochen Public Radio is proud to welcome Noelle Riley as our next news director. She brings a wealth of editorial experience, a passion for journalism and a strong sense of how to lead a newsroom. 

Formerly the editor of Craig Daily Press in Colorado, Riley led the newspaper to winning numerous awards including overall editorial excellence three times in four years. IPR’s executive director Peter Payette says her high aspirations are what public radio needs.

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