Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A family court judge in Kentucky is facing numerous accusations of professional and sexual misconduct, as state authorities say Kenton County Judge Dawn Gentry coerced colleagues to support her election campaign, made inappropriate advances toward an attorney and had sex in a courthouse office.

Greta Thunberg, the activist who has quickly become a leading voice on climate change, is Time's Person of the Year for 2019. At 16, she is the youngest person to earn the title in the magazine's 92-year history.

Thunberg burst onto the world stage in the past year, organizing school strikes and protest marches to call attention to a climate crisis that she says older generations are not taking seriously enough.

The University of Phoenix is paying a record $191 million to settle a complaint filed by the Federal Trade Commission accusing the for-profit university of using deceptive ads to lure students with the promise of future job opportunities with large companies such as AT&T, Adobe, Twitter, Microsoft and Yahoo.

The settlement includes a plan to cancel $141 million in student debts that are owed to the school by people who enrolled from October 2012 through the end of 2016 – the period in which the FTC says prospective students might have been duped.

Bill Cosby will remain in prison for sexual assault, after the Pennsylvania Superior Court affirmed his conviction for three counts of aggravated indecent assault Tuesday. Cosby is currently serving a sentence of three to 10 years for drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand at his home outside Philadelphia in 2004.

A man shot and killed six people at a hospital in the eastern Czech city of Ostrava early Tuesday morning, setting off a manhunt that ended when the suspected gunman killed himself as police were closing in.

In addition to the six dead, three people were injured, Interior Minister Jan Hamacek said in an update about what he called a "huge tragedy."

Updated at 9:50 a.m.

The World Anti-Doping Agency's executive committee says Russian athletes can't compete under their flag at international events for the next four years, declaring Russia's Anti-Doping Agency to be noncompliant with its rules. The committee says critical data about Russia's athletics programs was "neither complete nor fully authentic."

Updated at 9:32 p.m. ET

The gunman who killed three people at Naval Air Station Pensacola on Friday morning was a Saudi aviation student, officials say. The gunman was killed by a sheriff's deputy after the shooting, which left eight people injured.

General Motors and LG Chemical plan to make battery cells for electric-powered vehicles, unveiling a joint venture that they expect to create more than 1,100 jobs in northeast Ohio. The companies say they'll invest up to $2.3 billion in the venture.

The project is centered around Lordstown, Ohio, where GM shuttered a plant last March that had produced the Chevrolet Cruze. The new plant in the Lordstown area will make battery cells for GM's upcoming all-electric vehicles, from a Cadillac sedan to a new electric truck that's slated for release in late 2021.

Thousands of people are marching in the streets of Paris, Lyon, Marseilles and other French cities Thursday, as more than 30 unions launch a massive workers' strike that's meant to shut down the country and force President Emmanuel Macron to reevaluate his plans for pension reform.

The strike is being compared to the crippling protests of 1995, which were also triggered by a retirement reform effort and which unraveled the career of former Prime Minister Alain Juppé.

George Zimmerman is suing the family of the teenager he shot nearly eight years ago, seeking more than $100 million from Trayvon Martin's parents, their attorney and others. Zimmerman claims he was the victim of a conspiracy, along with malicious prosecution and defamation.

Martin's family has responded with a statement saying there's no evidence to back Zimmerman's contentions that he was the victim of a conspiracy.

Germany has declared two employees of the Russian Embassy in Berlin to be personae non gratae, as the German foreign ministry says there is evidence that a Georgian citizen's murder in Berlin was a state-sponsored contract killing. Prosecutors say they've uncovered evidence that seems to link the suspect to the Russian Defense Ministry.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping launched a new China-Russia natural gas pipeline on Monday, connecting a Siberian gas field to a city in northeastern China.

The initial phase of the pipeline was built in just five years, after the China National Petroleum Corp signed a deal worth $400 billion with Russian energy giant Gazprom in May 2014.

China is barring U.S. Navy port calls and American military aircraft from visiting Hong Kong in retaliation for Washington's recent adoption of the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act — legislation that supports pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong.

Hurricane-force winds, blizzard conditions, heavy snowfall — and a "bomb cyclone" on the West Coast: Those are the dire predictions of weather forecasters, who are warning Thanksgiving travelers to be cautious and prepare for delays as two powerful back-to-back storms hit the western and central U.S. this week.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

A powerful 6.4 magnitude earthquake rocked Albania's central coast overnight Tuesday, severely damaging buildings and triggering more than 100 aftershocks across the Balkan Peninsula. At least 18 people are dead, according to The Associated Press, which cites Albania's Defense Ministry. Hundreds of other people were injured in the quake.

Updated at 3:55 p.m. ET

Police are searching for the bold thieves who made off with priceless diamonds and other historic treasures from the Grünes Gewölbe, or "Green Vault," state museum in Dresden, Germany, early Monday.

The museum has a large collection of jewels, Baroque artifacts and intricately crafted golden tableaux amassed between 1723 and 1730 by August the Strong, the Saxon elector and arts patron who later became king of Poland.

London's transportation regulator has refused to renew Uber's license to operate in the U.K. capital, saying the company is not "fit and proper" to run a private ride-hiring service. The city says Uber's systems repeatedly allowed unauthorized drivers to pick up passengers.

"We think this decision is wrong and we will appeal," Uber's U.K. division says, adding that 3.5 million people use Uber's app and services in London. Uber's license was due to expire on Monday.

Tesla co-founder and CEO Elon Musk showed off his company's all-electric "Cybertruck" on Thursday, touting its versatility and toughness. But the truck's unique design — it follows one angle from the front bumper to the top of the windshield, for instance — threw some Tesla fans for a loop.

And during a demonstration to show off the truck's "armor glass," the windows smashed.

South Korea has reversed its decision to scrap a military intelligence-sharing agreement with Japan, hours before the move was to become official at midnight Friday. South Korea had said in August that it would leave the pact, after Japan removed the country from its "whitelist" of favored trade partners.

The eleventh-hour reversal salvages a 2016 pact brokered by the Obama administration that has allowed South Korea and Japan to share valuable information about their neighbors, most notably North Korea and China.

The author of a sweeping new U.N. study on the detaining and jailing of children worldwide acknowledges that he erred in saying the U.S. is holding more than 100,000 children in migration-related detention. The author, human rights lawyer Manfred Nowak, says he wasn't aware at the time that the number was from 2015. He adds that it reflected the number of children detained during the entire year.

A Hong Kong citizen who worked for the British Consulate-General in Hong Kong says secret police officers tortured him in mainland China, accusing him of being a spy and working to agitate pro-democracy protests.

In a lengthy Facebook post, Simon Cheng says he was beaten, put into stress positions and deprived of sleep for a roughly two-week period in August after Chinese police detained him at a train station at Hong Kong's border with the mainland.

Sweden's deputy director of public prosecutions, Eva-Marie Persson, says she has decided to end her office's investigation of rape allegations against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. Persson's office says the evidence "has weakened considerably."

Despite her decision, Persson said in a news conference in Stockholm on Tuesday that she found the account of the alleged victim to be credible.

Posted on Nov. 20 at 5:15 p.m. ET

An updated report about the study and the author's error has been posted here.

Posted on Nov. 19 at 6:53 p.m. ET

We have withdrawn this story about U.S. incarceration rates of children because the U.N. study's author has acknowledged a significant error in the data. We will post a revised article with more complete information as soon as possible.

An estimated 600 pro-democracy protesters are locked in a violent standoff with police at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus, according to the student body president. Protesters lost ground when police stormed the school; now some hope to escape, and others are asking supporters to come help.

Updated at 8:25 p.m. ET

The shooting suspect in Santa Clarita, Calif., has died one day after the attack at Saugus High School that killed two students. Authorities identified him as Nathaniel Tennosuke Berhow, 16, a junior at the school. Officials say he died at a hospital where he was being treated for a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

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