stateside from michigan radio

 

Today on Stateside, we talk to a biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration about the aftermath of the partial government shutdown. Plus, Rep. Fred Upton, R, explains why the EPA needs to set PFAS standards for drinking water. 

Today on Stateside, we hear from the president of the State Board of Education following an MSU report’s findings that Michigan leads the country in declining school funds. Plus, we talk with the CEO leading the charge on digital license plates in Michigan.

Today on Stateside, how have communities across Michigan fared in the nearly 10 years since the official end of the Great Recession? Plus, a conversation with a chef from Detroit who’s elevating the art of cannabis edibles beyond the usual pot brownie. 

Today on Stateside, Representative-elect for Michigan's 8th District Elissa Slotkin tells us why she joined 45 fellow freshman House Democrats and signed a letter pushing for change from party leaders. Plus, the president of a coalition of Great Lakes mayors weighs in on the Great Lakes Compact Council's recent announcement that it will change how it reviews water withdrawals. 

Today on Stateside, the Michigan legislature has been busy pushing through bills during lame duck. The question is: will Governor Rick Snyder sign them? Plus, how training police to interact with people who have a mental illness or cognitive disability can reduce the chance of a violent encounter. 


As of today, Michigan is the first state in the midwest to allow recreational use of marijuana. What changes can we expect? Plus, we hear music that prisoners at Auschwitz concentration camp arranged and performed for their Nazi captors. 

 

Today, big changes in the lame duck session could be coming over who controls oversight of Michigan schools. Bills sponsored by term-limited Representative Tim Kelly would create a new 13-member education commission. Plus, voters approved Proposal 3, also called "Promote the Vote," on Nov. 6, but now Senator Mike Kowall has introduced a series of bills during the lame duck session that would alter what voters have approved.

Today on Stateside, General Motors is set to keep receiving tax breaks from the state of Michigan until 2029. That's in spite of the company's recent decision to cut thousands of jobs and shut down production at two plants in the state. Plus, a co-author of this year's National Climate Assessment shares how climate change is projected to impact Michigan and the Midwest in coming decades. 

 

Today, we speak to MLive reporter Paula Gardner, co-author of an investigative report that found PFAS chemicals are still being released in large quantities by businesses across the state. Plus, a new bill proposed in the state Senate would remove protections from some Michigan wetlands on private property. Opponents say it would have devastating effects, but supporters say it's protecting property owners from government overreach.  

 

Today on Stateside, we speak with a Grand Rapids couple about their 61-year-long tradition of attending University Musical Society's performance of Handel's Messiah. Plus, General Motors announced Monday it will cut 14,000 jobs in North America. We discuss the disconnect between the political promises President Donald Trump made to workers in the Rust Belt, and the reality of running a transportation business in 2018. 

Today on Stateside, Michigan's lame-duck legislature moved to roll back previously-passed legislation that increased the state's minimum wage and mandated paid sick leave. Plus, a member of the Mackinac Bridge Authority weighs in on the state's plan to have the organization oversee a tunnel to house the replacement pipelines for of Enbridge's aging Line 5. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Today on Stateside, a Michigan State University economist weighs in on what General Motors' decision to lay off workers and shutter factories means for the Michigan communities and workers involved. Plus, what to expect from the Michigan Legislature as it enters its lame-duck session. 

Today, Stateside speaks with Michigan’s new Governor-elect Gretchen Whitmer to discuss her top priorities when she takes office, the Line 5 pipeline, and her plans to work with the Republican leadership in the state Legislature. Plus, Tunde Olaniran, a Flint native and staple of the Detroit music scene, discusses his new album with us.

Today on Stateside, breaking down the results of the midterm elections, which saw record high numbers of voters participate. Plus, the leaders behind the ballot proposals to legalize recreational marijuana and change how congressional district lines are drawn talk about what comes next, after voters approved both measures. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Today on Stateside, county clerks from Ottawa and Oakland Counties weigh in on how voting is going in their precincts on this Election Day. Plus, a lead investigator on NASA's Parker Solar Probe talks about what scientists hope to learn from the mission, which will bring a human object closer to the Sun than ever before.    

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.  

Today on Stateside, a voting rights expert with the ACLU shares what Michiganders should know ahead of tomorrow’s midterm election. Plus, a conversation with actor and comedian Marc Evan Jackson who plays Shawn, an all-knowing immortal judge, on NBC’s The Good Place.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

 

Today, the Michigan Legislature passed a law mandating paid sick leave in September, but they're already making plans to amend it after the midterms. We speak to the leader of the group that created the law. Plus, with the election just four days away, make sure you have the facts on the proposal that would legalize recreational marijuana. 

 

Today, we'll talk about the race that will fill two seats on Michigan's State Board of Education. Plus, as Veterans Day approaches, Stateside is taking the opportunity to sit down with a couple of America's longest-living veterans and talk about their experiences in WWII and beyond. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

 

Today, in the spirit of Halloween, we bring you two different segments on the Minnie Quay ghost story and its historical roots. Plus, Kirk Steudle joins Stateside on his last day as director of the Michigan Department of Transportation to discuss what he's learned about the intersection of infrastructure and politics. 

Today on Stateside, we talk with a Southfield rabbi about the recent attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue that left 11 congregants dead. Plus, a conversation with a leading expert on sexual assault prevention who is working to help Michigan State University better respond to sexual violence on campus following the Larry Nassar abuse scandal.

 

Today on Stateside, are Democratic candidates paying enough attention to Detroit voters? Plus, we continue our reporting on Emilio Gutierrez-Soto, the Mexican journalist seeking asylum in the U.S. who is facing deportation. 


State agency overseeing funeral homes responds to fetal remains scandal 

 

Today on Stateside, two consultants on opposite sides of the political spectrum recapped Wednesday night's gubernatorial debate. Plus, our “Work in Progress” series features a conversation between two Catholic priests, one just beginning his career, and the other recently retired. 


Schuette and Whitmer trade barbs one last time in final debate before Election Day 

 

Today on Stateside, the executive director of the Michigan Association of School Superintendents and Administrators talks about how Michigan school districts are responding after a company that provides substitute teachers to more than 100 Michigan districts abruptly closed its offices. Plus, we hear from the Republican and Democratic candidates for Michigan’s next Secretary of State.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Today on Stateside, we hear the first episode of Believed. It's a podcast series produced by Michigan Radio and NPR that explores how former sports doctor Larry Nassar sexually abused patients for more than 20 years. Plus, an interview with the series’ co-hosts, Michigan Radio reporters Kate Wells and Lindsey Smith.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Today on Stateside, what are gubernatorial candidates not spending enough time discussing? Our political commentators weigh in. Plus, even in statistically identical neighborhoods, children in Detroit yield disproportionate success rates. 

 

Pages