Film Industry

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

After a run of 11 years at the State Theatre in Traverse City, broadcasts of the Metropolitan Opera performances will no longer be streamed live at the theatre.


Update 8/3/18, 6:30 p.m.: In a written response provided to IPR, the Traverse City Film Festival writes, "In December 2017, after a unanimous vote by the Traverse City Film Festival Board of Directors, the executive committee of the board met with Deb Lake in-person to inform her that her employment was terminated."

The former executive director of the Traverse City Film Festival says Michael Moore is lying regarding her termination last year. 

The Traverse City Festival is celebrating it's 14th year in 2018.
Dan Wanschura

Update 8/3/18, 6:30 p.m.: In a written response provided to IPR, the Traverse City Film Festival writes, "In December 2017, after a unanimous vote by the Traverse City Film Festival Board of Directors, the executive committee of the board met with Deb Lake in-person to inform her that her employment was terminated."

The comedy panel from the 2017 Traverse City Film Festival includes include Samm Levine, Sean Jordan, Bob Byington, Jack Robbins, and Zefrey Throwell. The panel is moderated by Doug Benson.

Please be advised this panel discussion does include profanity and other language listeners might find offensive.


Filmmakers talk about documentary film during the 2017 Traverse City Film Festival.
Linnaea Melcarek

The documentary panel from the 2017 Traverse City Film Festival features Anniken Hoel and Andrew Grant (director and producer of "Cause of Death: Unknown"), Neil Berkeley (director of "Gilbert"), Amir Bar-Lev (director of "Long Strange Trip"), Jonathan Olshefski (director of "Quest"), and Anna Chai and Nari Kye (directors of "Wasted! The Story of Food Waste"). Moderated by Thom Powers, documentary programmer for the Toronto International Film Fest.

 


Leonard Maltin is a renowned film reviewer and critic. He's a featured guest at the 2017 Traverse City Film Festival.
Becky Sapp

Leonard Maltin is one of the most recognized film critics out there. Why do his reviews resonate with so many people?

“I love movies," he says. "And I love what I do. People tell me that comes through...it’s honest, it’s genuine.”

Filmmakers talk about the ways their films have changed them and their audiences. 

The panel is comprised of Pamela Yates, Paco de Onis, Pau Faus, and Zaradasht Ahmed.

TCFF 2016 Panel: Men Make Movies

Jul 29, 2016

Traverse City Film Festival began its conversation about gender inequality in the film industry with the men. The two percent female figure mentioned at the opening of the show could have come from this New York Times article.

John Robert Williams converted an old elementary school gym into his new studio.
John Robert Williams Photography

John Robert Williams is a photographer with an eye for potential. 

When he moved out of his downtown Traverse City studio last year, and into an old elementary school gymnasium, he began dreaming of all the different ways he could use the space. Where most people would probably see a big, mostly empty room, Williams sees a studio full of potential.

“I lie awake at night thinking of cool new things and shots I can do,” says Williams.


Aaron Selbig

Documentary filmmaker Rick Prelinger makes films that are carefully pieced together from his collection of more than 14,000 home movies.

Two of them are playing this week at the Traverse City Film Festival. One film takes a look at the American road trip. The other is sort of a time capsule of the city of Detroit.

Max Chang/Flickr

Michigan’s film incentives could soon end with the stroke of Gov. Rick Snyder’s pen.

The state House and Senate approved a bill to phase out the film credits on the last day before lawmakers go on an intermittent schedule for the summer.

Supporters of House Bill 4122 say the level of economic activity generated by the program doesn’t justify its cost. And they say the film industry has never taken hold in Michigan.

The Freep Film Festival begins its four-day run tomorrow.

This will be the festival's second year. It will open with a double feature of films from two of the Detroit Free Press' own videographers and photographers.

The first is Fire Photo 1. It revolves around Bill Eisner who has been the unofficial photographer for the Detroit fire department for over 50 years.

Here's a trailer: