arts education

David Reimer incorporates sports into his music teaching.
Erin Iafrate

March Madness begins this week. The huge college basketball tournament starts with 68 teams and will eventually end with one national champion. But for some in northern Michigan, March Madness means more than basketball. For 10-year-old Ricky Bristol, who lives in East Jordan, it means practicing his violin.


This Friday, March 17, the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra will feature performances by the concerto competition winners. Chea Young Kang, a senior from South Korea, visited IPR's Studio A recently for a performance and conversation.

Ms. Kang won the concerto competition singing “Una Voce Poco Fa” from Rossini’s opera The Barber of Seville. She sang the piece in IPR's Studio A. 

  The Next Idea

Get kids started at an early age with the arts and the payoff could be better math, science and literacy skills, in addition to better overall learning skills.

That’s the idea behind the Livings Arts' Detroit Wolf Trap Program. Its goal is to narrow the achievement gap between affluent and less-affluent areas through arts education.

Shannon Cason, a storyteller from Detroit, shares a personal narrative with the Front Street Writers on Thursday.
Anne Stanton

Tonight, The Moth Mainstage will be performed before a sold-out crowd in Traverse City. But yesterday, a few storytellers from The Moth did a workshop with a classroom of about 25 high school students. 

They talked about how storytelling builds community and helps people reflect on their own lives.

Shannon Cason is from Detroit. He says growing up, he always loved playing games. But, when he got older his love for games got him in trouble with gambling.

The Next Idea

In his recent op-ed piece in the Financial Times, “Europe is a continent that has run out of ideas,” Economics Nobel Laureate Edmund Phelps hangs the near collapse of the world’s second largest economy on a failure of the collective culture to produce real innovators.

This week the Green Room celebrates the ukulele, a sweet sounding little instrument with a growing fan base all over the world. Plus, Kate Botello plays something unexpected.

The Next Idea

In 2009, the headline of a Time magazine cover story read “The Tragedy of Detroit” with a shadowy photo of a blighted factory in the background. The national press was brutal.

Recently, industrial designer Jeff DeBoer wrote an essay for The Next Idea raising the idea of making Michigan "the design Mecca of the world."

And he believes the key to that is to make art as important as the science, technology, engineering and math classes currently occupying much of the nation's attention.

Where is serious music going?

Mar 26, 2014

Where is 'classical' music headed in the future?  Interlochen Arts Academy alumni Theo VanDyke, a trumpeter now at Juilliard, and Kens Lui, a trombonist at New England Conservatory, talk with two leaders at Interlochen Center for the Arts:  President Jeffrey Kimpton and Director of Music Kedrik Merwin, about their thoughts on music innovation, musical assignments to avoid, and the exhilarating life that music offers.