Points North

Fridays at 6:45 a.m and 8:45 a.m

Points North is a ten-minute weekly show from Interlochen Public Radio where we explore northern Michigan through the news, people and places. The show connects you with life in the region through carefully crafted journalism and sound-rich storytelling. 

How to listen:

On the dial Fridays at 6:45 a.m. and 8:45 a.m.  | pointsnorthradio.org | the IPR app | wherever you get your podcasts

Amanda Holmes

This week we look into why commercial fishers in the Great Lakes have been left out of federal aid for fisheries nationwide, to the tune of $300 million. (The Great Lakes got zero.)

It's not the goldenrod

Sep 17, 2020
Cheryl Bartz

Cheryl Gross says a common misconception is “beautiful yellow goldenrod flowers” are the cause seasonal allergies. 

“They’re not,” says the president of Plant it Wild.

 

Gross says the real culprit is ragweed.  

 

It blooms at the same time as goldenrod, but isn’t very noticeable. It’s dull green with tiny dull green flowers.  

 

Ragweed doesn’t need to be flashy because it doesn’t need to attract insects. 

 

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

This week we bring you two birds with very different reputations. 

Field Guide: tomato hornworms

Sep 4, 2020
Courtesy of Duke Elsner

While no gardener welcomes a tomato hornworm--they eat twice their weight in leaves each day--they are impressive creatures.

 

They pupate underground, six inches underground. Duke Elsner says that’s amazing since caterpillars aren’t really built to tunnel. Then they have to get back out as a moth.  

 

“It’s remarkable how many survive at all in this world,” says the retired MSU Extension educator.

 

Peter Payette

Maria San Miguel was nervous about getting a coronavirus test. 

“I was seeing on the television and the internet that there was something they were going to put up your nose really far,” she says in Spanish. 

Kaye LaFond

This week on Points North, democrats worry the controversial Line 5 pipeline is dividing labor,  environmental and tribal groups ahead of the Michigan primary.

Plus, hear how environmental policies could impact the presidential race in Michigan. 


Michigan likely needs realtor buy-in to pass a septic code

Feb 28, 2020
A man in jeans and a lightly-colored coat stands on a front porch dusted with snow.
Mike Krebs / Traverse City Record-Eagle

Realtors and interest groups opposed to regulation are shaping septic system policies in Michigan's state and local politics.

Realtors don't like the idea of inspections tied to home sales. Anti-regulation lawmakers don't like the alternatives.

Samantha York / Star Line Mackinac Island Ferry

This week on Points North: Grand Traverse Bay is freezing less and less, according to historical data.

Plus, making music that sounds like melting glaciers.

Ice cover on Lake Michigan is happening less and less, and that’s why Grand Traverse Bay hasn’t frozen this year. 

The bay had already frozen out to Power Island by this time last year and the year before.

Read the full story. 

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North: The foundation of the historic Point Betsie Lighthouse in Frankfort is crumbling.

High waters and waves cracked the barrier that protects it from Lake Michigan.

Plus, there are not many commercial fishers left in the Great Lakes.

In Michigan, they have long been at odds with the state Department of Natural Resources.

Now people who catch fish to sell say the state is attempting to put them out of business.

 

 

Kaye LaFond / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North we take a look at pollution in Charlevoix. Also, there's no immediate solution for excessive drinking on northern Michigan rivers. 

Plus, Little Traverse Bay is getting new ferry service. 

 


Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, we examine the tart cherry tariff fallout and what it means for the industry. 

Plus, a Northport man made his childhoom dream a reality after a traumatic brain industry in his late 30s. 

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, we dissect how many elk were poached this winter and why that number has increased. 

Plus, guides are illegally helping hunters bag an elk. What’s next for the guide industry?

Last month, three more elk were poached in the Pigeon River State Forest.

It was the latest in a series of elk poaching that has made the past few months some of the worst in recent memory for Michigan’s elk herd.

Kaye LaFond / Interlochen Public Radio

Rivers all over the world have the same problem — fish can’t swim up them because of dams.

 

Fisheries biologists want to see if they can leave dams in place but allow certain fish to pass, but it’s complicated and the idea has created controversy in Traverse City. 

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, we talk to the publisher of the Glen Arbor Sun about a proposed housing development near Crystal Lake. Also, a man lost nearly 80 pounds on a plant-based diet. 

 

Plus, kids now have access to STEM learning at regional libraries. 

 

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

 

This week on Points North, we have inspiration for your New Year’s resolutions with stories about fresh starts and big life changes.

 


 

Golam Rabbani was a human rights lawyer until he was forced to flee Bangladesh for opposing the government. He and his family made their way to Traverse City by way of New York and Port Huron. 

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Syringe service programs involve giving medical supplies and clean needles to injection drug users.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say people in those programs are three times more likely to stop using drugs than those who aren't in them.

Kaye LaFond / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, we examine propane needs in the Upper Peninsula. Do yoopers need Line 5 for propane, or would they survive without the pipelines?

 

Tribal nations, Michigan’s governor and environmental groups are all calling for a shutdown of Line 5: the pipeline that carries oil underneath the Straits of Mackinac.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Winter is on it’s way, and everyone in northern Michigan is getting ready.

Cherry farmers are protecting their crops from the cold, and they need to save as many cherries as they can. 

Plus, learn how you can help meteorologists stay on top of snowfall this winter.

  

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, we’re talking about baiting and hunting, and the ongoing debate about whether to keep deer healthy versus taking away a tool for hunting. 

Plus, a turkey hunter tells us why he loves the sport.

Gary Langley, FAA certified sUAS pilot / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, we dive into the restoration of the Boardman River since three dams were removed.

 

The story ties into the thousands of aging dams in Michigan. Many are more than 50 years old, and some aren’t safe. Removing them is good for floodplains and native fish, but it costs money — sometimes more than is available.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, Leelanau voters will decide the fate of an early childhood program.

Plus, tribal and city officials celebrate the new Clinch Park art installation honoring the Anishinaabek.

 

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, northern Michigan’s signature cherry industry is struggling amid trade tensions and a lack of federal support.

Plus, learn about a 10-acre corn maze in Traverse City. 

NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab

 

This week on Points North, we follow harmful algal blooms to Six Mile Lake and talk to a Traverse City Record-Eagle reporter about septic tank issues. 

 

Gary Langley / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, how rising water levels and shoreline erosion are threatening homeowners on the coast of Lake Michigan.

Plus, how businesses in Fishtown are already falling into the water.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, the Pere Marquette River is internationally-recognized for its brown trout, lake trout and salmon. But locals are worried that a train could soon derail and spill toxic chemicals into the river.

Plus, amidst road budget debates in the State Capitol, hear a Q&A about Michigan's crumbling bridges.

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