Morning Edition

Monday-Friday, 5am-9am on Classical IPR
  • Hosted by Daniel Wanschura, David Greene, Steve Inskeep, Noel King, and Rachel Martin
  • Local Host Dan Wanschura

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition. Hosts David Greene, Steve Inskeep, Noel King, and Rachel Martin bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Until the crisis, June Freeman was doing a vital job. She provided home health care in San Diego. Six days a week, she visited a man with dementia.

JUNE FREEMAN: So I walk him in the park, feed him, doing puzzle with him.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Are enough Americans following national guidelines to reduce the spread of the coronavirus?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Well, Deborah Birx, a key member of the White House pandemic task force, says no.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This episode of StoryCorps originally aired in 2015.

Chloe Longfellow, 32, remembers her close relationship with her grandmother, Doris Louise Rolison, who taught her to cook in a kitchen that also served as a classroom for Rolison's life lessons.

"It's really surprising the amount of life lessons you can learn in a kitchen if you have the right teacher," Longfellow said.

Updated at 11:22 a.m. ET

Dennis Johnson fell victim last week to a new form of harassment known as "Zoombombing," in which intruders hijack video calls and post hate speech and offensive images such as pornography. It's a phenomenon so alarming that the FBI has issued a warning about using Zoom.

Like many people these days, Johnson is doing a lot of things over the Internet that he would normally do in person. Last week, he defended his doctoral dissertation in a Zoom videoconference.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Are enough Americans following national guidelines to reduce the spread of the coronavirus?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Well, Deborah Birx, a key member of the White House pandemic task force, says no.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The people working to get President Trump reelected are planning for how they are going to have to address the coronavirus pandemic on the campaign trail. They see an opportunity to rewrite the narrative and double down on Trump's America First agenda.

Non-profit organizations in northern Michigan are among those hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic.

 

Dave Mengebier is the president and CEO of the Grand Traverse Regional Community Foundation. He says more people depend on nonprofits for essentials during this crisis, but it’s a really tough time for those organizations to raise money. 

 


Interlochen Public Radio graphic

An employee of the East Jordan Family Health Center tested positive for the coronavirus. 

But Rachel Krino with the health center says the employee had no direct contact with patients.

"As soon as he showed symptoms on March 25 he went into self quarantine and self-monitoring," Krino said. "In terms of test results, we just found out yesterday.”

According to a press release from the health center that employee had recently traveled downstate. Now he's are feeling well and recovering.

A $500,000 grant from the state will support businesses in the 10 counties of northwest lower Michigan affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

About that same amount is also available through a new loan program from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.

 


Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

How much farther can Americans go in order to help contain the pandemic?

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Ellis Marsalis, jazz pianist, educator and patriarch of the Marsalis family, has died. His music students included Terence Blanchard, Donald Harrison, Harry Connick, Jr., and 4 of his sons.

: 4/01/20

In this report, we incorrectly refer to Ellis Marsalis III as Ellis Marsalis Jr.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

The Safe Harbor homeless shelter in Traverse City is partially re-opening due to the coronavirus pandemic.

In late March the seasonal facility announced they were closing early to prevent guests from catching or spreading the diease. 

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The audio for this story will be added when the story airs.

Acrobatic dancers from Mumbai's slums performed to a Bollywood song and wowed the audience. Fame may help them out of poverty. NPR's India producer visited some of their homes.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Pages