All Things Considered

Monday-Friday, 4pm-6:30pm on IPR News

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

 

Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, whose Supreme Court opinions transformed many areas of American law during his 34 year tenure, died at the age of 99 in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., of complications following a stroke he suffered Monday.

Chief Justice John Roberts confirmed Stevens' death in a statement from the Supreme Court.

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Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, a veteran of 34 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, has died. He was 99. Stevens was appointed by Republican President Gerald Ford. And while he was once viewed as moderately conservative, he eventually earned a reputation as the most liberal justice on a court dramatically more conservative than the one he joined in 1975. Here's NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.

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And winter is coming to the Emmy Awards one last time.

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Brian Lapointe, a research professor at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, has spent his career studying corals at the Looe Key Reef, in a National Marine Sanctuary in the Florida Keys.

Over that time, he's witnessed an alarming trend. In the past 20 year, half of Florida corals have died off.

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President Trump's reelection campaign is in full swing, and today, he went to one of the states he barely won in 2016 to reach out to a group of voters that he lost by a big margin. NPR's Danielle Kurtzleben reports.

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Some Michigan hospitals are experiencing a critical shortage of blood. Blood banks say supply is typically low in the summer because high school students, who make up a bulk of donations, are on break. But this year is especially bad. 

Spectrum Health, which has hospitals in west Michigan, says its reserve is down 84% from normal levels. Statewide blood banks are now issuing an emergency call for people to give blood.

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Today the state of Oklahoma laid out its closing argument for holding a pharmaceutical company responsible for the national opioid epidemic.

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BRAD BECKWORTH: Because the facts in this case showed the causation is causation. When you oversupply, people die.

SHAPIRO: That's Brad Beckworth, lawyer with the Oklahoma Attorney General's Office. On the other side, Johnson & Johnson attorney Larry Ottaway said opioids are already subject to a litany of rules.

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Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

With American Airlines joining United in pulling 737 Max planes from their schedules and cancelling flights into early November, many travel industry observers are bracing for the next shoe to drop: higher priced fares and cancelled flights for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays season.

American Airlines announced Monday it is pulling the 737 Max from its schedule through Nov. 2, canceling about 115 flights per day. American reported last week that the Max grounding has already cost the airline $185 million in lost revenue.

Oklahoma Opioid Trial Ends

Jul 15, 2019

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Today the state of Oklahoma laid out its closing argument for holding a pharmaceutical company responsible for the national opioid epidemic.

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Michigan House of Representatives

State Rep. Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg) is accused of extortion, soliciting a bribe and lying to the FBI. He has plead not guilty to all charges.

The trial is set for August 6 in Grand Rapids.

Prosecutors say Inman texted a lobbyist from the Michigan Regional Council of Carpenters and Millwrights (MRCCM) in June 2018 and offered to vote ‘no’ on a prevailing wage bill if MRCCM and other trade unions would donate more to his campaign.

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The bright lights of Broadway dimmed considerably last night during a massive power outage in New York City. Tens of thousands were without electricity for about five hours. Theaters were darkened, and shows were canceled, disappointing many fans and tourists. And believe it or not, the outage happened exactly 42 years after New York City's infamous 1977 blackout. That one resulted in widespread looting and violence. But last night, things seemed a lot more chill.

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At one time, the Volkswagen Beetle was so ubiquitous that its sighting is often punctuated by a swift punch in the arm and a shout of "Punch Buggy!" (Or "Slug Bug!" depending on your regional take on the road trip game).

But this week, the Beetle set off down the road to extinction. On Wednesday, Volkswagen ended production of the Beetle, saying it wants to set its sights on manufacturing electric vehicles.

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Baltimore Prepares For ICE Raids

Jul 13, 2019

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White House Social Media Summit Recap

Jul 13, 2019

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Jeffrey Epstein, the billionaire financier accused of sex crimes against many young women, visited and donated to Interlochen Center for the Arts. He was a student camper at Interlochen in the late ‘60s.  

 

A spokesperson for ICA says Epstein made contributions to the school and sponsored the building of a visitors cabin on campus.

 

Epstein stayed at that lodge for a week in August, 2000. But the school says there are no accusations against Epstein from current or former students. 

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In 2013, a video of a marriage proposal set to Betty Who's "Somebody Loves You" went viral on YouTube. The video shows a colorfully clad group perform a coordinated, joyful dance to the pop song in the middle of a Home Depot in Salt Lake City. According to Betty Who, the Home Depot performance is one of a number of proposals and wedding dances with the same soundtrack.

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