Stateside Staff

Sorry to Bother You is billed as a sci-fi comedy, and is playing in theaters nationwide after debuting at Sundance Film Festival.

It's about the story of a young black telemarketer from Oakland, California named Cassius Green, played by Lakeith Stanfield. An older co-worker, played by Danny Glover, offers advice that helps Cassius climb the ladder to telemarketing success by using his "white voice."

One of the very best ways to enjoy summer in Michigan is to park yourself under a tree or on a beach and get lost in a good book.

Poet Keith Taylor joined Stateside to talk about some of his suggestions for your summer reading list.

Recently retired as a creative writing teacher at the University of Michigan, Taylor just published another book called Ecstatic Destinations about his Ann Arbor neighborhood.

If you’re out in wooded or brushy areas this summer and want to avoid Lyme disease, here’s the advice of the day: Wear long sleeves and pants, and check yourself frequently for ticks, which spread the disease.

But for a time in the late 1990s and early 2000s, people had the option to take an even more preventative measure: They could get a Lyme disease vaccine.

There's something about the a crackling campfire and the looming mystery of a nighttime forest that creates the perfect atmosphere for telling a special kind of story.

Some campfire stories aim to send a shiver down your spine. Others seek to remember a past moment in history or teach a good life lesson.

With that tradition in mind, Stateside will be bringing you a series of stories this summer perfect for your next bonfire. 

Stateside 7.16.2018

Jul 16, 2018

Today on Stateside, a look at the business organizations tied to challenges of controversial ballot proposals, including mininum wage, electoral redistricting, and paid sick time. Plus, grab your s'mores supplies and gather 'round for the first campfire story in our summer series. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Stateside 7.12.2018

Jul 12, 2018

On today's Stateside, as robots begin to look and sound more like real humans, how will that change the way  that we interact with them in our everyday lives? Plus, a conversation with Motown royalty and founding member of The Four Tops Abdul “Duke” Fakir about the timeless appeal of Motown music.

To listen to individual interviews, click here or see below: 

This weekend, baseball fans will roll the clock way back, more than 150 years.

There's a four-game tournament of early baseball happening at Cambridge Junction Historic State Park in Brooklyn, Michigan.

That's where the Walker Tavern Wheels will be hosting an invitational with the Saginaw Old Golds, the Detroit Early Risers, and the Canton Cornshuckers.

 

You just never know when life has a great big surprise waiting just around the corner for you.

Just when you think it’s time to put your music dream on the shelf and go to dental school, you get a call from producers of NBC's The Voice, asking you to audition for the TV singing competition.

 


Michigan residents will vote on the legalization of recreational marijuana November 9. 

The state has strict laws against driving while drunk, and cops can test how intoxicated someone is with a quick breathalyzer test. 

But if weed is legalized, how will law enforcement identify someone who is driving while high? 

With the tap of your finger, you can access pretty much anything these days, whether you're streaming a movie or ordering a pair of shoes. But just 50 years ago, Michigan had a law banning most businesses from being open on Sunday. 

That law, which was upheld by the United States Supreme Court in 1962, fell into a category of “blue laws.”

Has Governor Snyder's team partnered with Enbridge Energy in deciding the fate of Line 5?

That's the question explored in a joint investigation by Bridge Magazine and the Michigan Campaign Finance Network.

Stateside 7.11.2018

Jul 11, 2018

Today on Stateside, as more states (including Michigan) consider legalizing recreational marijuana, how will cops be able to tell who is too stoned to drive? Plus, there was no spitting, cussing, or mitts allowed in the "gentlemanly game" of early baseball.  

  

The plight of migrant children being separated from their families at detention centers has grabbed the attention of many across the country. The first reunification deadline to reunite children under five with their families was Tuesday.

From this crisis many grassroots groups have sprung up, as parents, teachers, foster parents, and religious leaders search for ways to help migrant families who were separated.

This week brings the 26th go-round for Detroit's annual Concert of Colors presented by the Arab American National Museum.

The event starts tomorrow and runs through Sunday. It celebrates cultural diversity through music and the spoken word.

This year, the Concert of Colors has inspired a sister festival in Jackson. It's called the Jackson Unity Festival.

Things appear to be moving ahead for construction on a new bridge between Detroit and Windsor. Last week, a consortium of builders was chosen to construct the Gordie Howe International Bridge.

However, trade tensions between the U.S. and Canada continue to rise, and the Moroun family — owners of the rival Ambassador Bridge — recently ran an oppositional ad on Fox and Friends asking President Trump to stop construction of the bridge.

Insurance companies base their business on looking for ways to minimize risk.

For example, a life insurance company will ask you whether you scuba dive.

But there is one risk they don't calculate: insurance companies do not ask whether you own a gun.

Kristen Moore is an associate professor of Mathematics at the University of Michigan. She co-authored a piece for The Actuary Magazine exploring how the insurance industry treats the risk of firearms. 

It’s time for another edition of Theater Talk with David Kiley, editor-in-chief of Encore Michigan. Kiley joined Stateside to preview and review plays opening around Michigan this month.

Stateside 7.10.2018

Jul 10, 2018

Today on Stateside, a grassroots effort to help migrant parents with transportation and resources after being reunited with their kids. Plus, a long-running Detroit concert celebrating cultural diversity through music inspires a sister festival in Jackson. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Three migrant dads reunited with their children in Grand Rapids

This year's high school graduates have walked across the stage and received their diplomas. Now it's time to decide: what comes next?

The manufacturing industry is hoping that at least some of those students will decide heading straight from high school into a four-year-college program is not the only path to a successful life and a well-paying job.

Discover Manufacturing is a West Michigan program working to close the talent gap, get rid of old stereotypes of a "factory job,” and help students pursue careers in manufacturing.

 


On Friday, President Trump's first tariffs hit $34 billion worth of Chinese imports.

Beijing quickly responded with its own tariffs on equal amounts of American-made goods. Many believe that this back-and-forth between China and U.S. is the start of a trade war.

Imported steel and aluminum are one of the main targets of Trump’s latest tariffs. 

Dan Cooper is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Michigan. He sat down with Stateside's Cynthia Canty to discuss why these tariffs would have minimal effect on the U.S. if the country did a better job recycling its scrap metal. 

She brought us the stories of Great Girls in Michigan History. Now, writer Patricia Majher is focusing on the boys.

Her new book is Bold Boys in Michigan History.

In it, Majher tells the stories of Michigan boys who did remarkable things before they were 20. These bold young men include a filmmaker, musicians, inventors, athletes, a politician, and more.

It's a momentous week at the Frederik Meijer Gardens.

Its once-tiny corpse flower is now a strapping plant, reaching several feet high, and it's about to bloom for the very first time. 

Stateside 7.9.2018

Jul 9, 2018

On Stateside today, President Trump's tariffs on imported steel and aluminum have caused some chaos in the global markets. But would tariffs and trade wars matter as much if we did a better job of recycling scrap metal? Plus, 18 years after arriving at Frederik Meijer Gardens as a seedling, a corpse flower named Putricia makes her debut. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Stateside 7.6.2018

Jul 6, 2018

On today's Stateside, Congressman Dan Kildee talks about his visit to one of the centers that house migrant children separated from their parents at the border. Plus, a Zeeland drum maker who makes everything from snare drums to professional quality tambourines. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Stateside 7.5.2018

Jul 5, 2018

On Stateside today, Joanne Savas didn't have a fortune to pass on to her grandkids, so she came up with a different kind of inheritance: a book. Plus, a look at the many ways America has tried - and failed -  to tackle poverty in one of the the world's richest countries.

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

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