Stateside Staff

On Stateside today, Michigan has budgeted tens of millions of dollars to improve an indigent defense system consistently ranked as one of the worst in the country. Plus, should companies that bottle Michigan water be paying more in taxes? 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

 


June in Michigan means time to tuck away the storm windows, dust off that swimsuit, and maybe attend a wedding or two. 

Weddings are currently a more than a $1 billion a year business in Michigan.

But the wedding industry here might be even bigger if the state's tradition of "quickie weddings" at the turn of the last century had continued.

The Detroit Planning and Economic Development Committee will meet tomorrow to discuss the Cass-Henry Historic District designation. The area is adjacent to the recently built, taxpayer-subsidized Little Caesars Arena.

There has been a growing concern among some that Olympia Development, owned by the Ilitch family, has not been keeping their promises to develop the neighborhood. 

The Supreme Court issued a landmark decision Wednesday in the case Janus v. the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Council 31. AFSCME is the largest public sector union in the country.

In a 5-4 decision, the conservative majority held that public sector workers who are represented by unions cannot be required to pay any union dues.

It is the 157th birthday of someone whose life is proof that you shouldn't let the negative opinions of your professor get in the way of your ambitions.

William Mayo, half of the dynamic duo who went on to found the famed Mayo Clinic, was born this week in 1861.

Dr. Howard Markel, University of Michigan medical historian and PBS contributor, joined Stateside to tell us about his extraordinary life. 

 

President Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan will be in Wisconsin this Thursday for the groundbreaking of the $10 billion Foxconn plant.

The Taiwanese electronics company has promised thousands of jobs in Racine County and in return has been offered $4.5 billion in tax incentives. 

Stateside 6.27.2018

Jun 27, 2018

Today on Stateside, Taiwanese company Foxconn will be able to use nearly 6 million gallons of Lake Michigan water every day, even though it's outside the Great Lakes basin. Plus, before Vegas became known for 24-hour chapels, Michigan was the go-to place for a quickie wedding. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

 


The world knows her as the doctor who used science to force the state of Michigan to admit it had caused the Flint water crisis.

 

President Trump's executive order ending family separations at the southern border, but leaving in place the zero-tolerance policy, did nothing to quell the national anger and confusion.

Trump's order did not address what happens for some 2,300 children who have already been taken from their parents after crossing the border. Those children are currently in shelters and foster care across the country, inlcuding here in Michigan.

On Monday, the Food and Drug Administration made history. For the first time, the agency approved a hemp-derived product for use in treating epilepsy. 

The decision comes as more and more Michigan farmers and researchers have their eye on producing hemp for commercial and medical uses. 

Stateside 6.26.2018

Jun 26, 2018

On Stateside today, three years after helping expose the water crisis in Flint, we hear from Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha's on her new memoir chronicling her work in the city's recovery. Plus, what comes next for the dozens of migrant children in Michigan who were separated from their parents at the border? 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below:  

Stateside 6.25.2018

Jun 25, 2018

Today on Stateside, Detroit Public Schools Community District has a long list of building repairs that will cost around $500 million to fix. But the district has no way to borrow the money it needs to pay for those repairs. Plus, how Michigan libraries ended up on the front lines of the state's opioid crisis. 

To listen to individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Stateside 6.22.2018

Jun 22, 2018

Today on Stateside, Canada's trade minister says Detroit is a prime example of how tariffs could end up hurting the interdependent economies of the U.S. and Canada. Plus, how violent race riots in 1943 led to the birth of an early civil rights movement in Detroit. 

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Stateside 6.21.2018

Jun 21, 2018

Today on Stateside, a CDC report on the health effects of PFAS, initially buried by the White House and EPA, recommends a much lower threshold for exposure to the chemicals. Plus, a quirky summer festival that combines Great Depression-era farming and ooey-gooey sticky buns. 

To hear individual interviews click here or see below: 

Stateside 6.20.2018

Jun 20, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear from a pair of Michigan foster parents who have opened up their home to three migrant children separated from their parents. Plus, a former paralympian wants to bring her passion for ballroom dancing to other dancers using wheelchairs. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Today on Stateside, the archbishop of Detroit responds to the separation of migrant families under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy. Plus, writer Steve Lehto will soon set out on a Great Lakes canoe trip inspired by the 19th century explorer and former Detroit mayor Douglass Houghton. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Stateside 6.18.2018

Jun 18, 2018

Today on Stateside, Michigan Congressman Dan Kildee says the policy of separating migrant children from their families is "morally reprehensible." Plus, how finding a community helped a Grand Rapids man recover from 15 years of addiction, and his efforts to help others find community too. 

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Today on Stateside, lawsuits against opioid manufacturers in Michigan face steep odds thanks to 1995 law. Plus, a summery cocktail to cool down on this very hot weekend. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below. 

Stateside 6.14.2018

Jun 14, 2018

Today on Stateside, how to talk to a friend or family member who you think may be considering suicide. Plus, Detroit reporter Charlie LeDuff talks race, politics, and more in his new book Sh*tshow.

To listen to individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Stateside 6.13.2018

Jun 13, 2018

Today on Stateside, State Senator Patrick Colbeck pushes to make thee state's social studies curriculum to be "politically neutral." Plus, the story of how Marshall, Michigan protected a black family from a group of Kentucky slave catchers. 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below. 

There is plenty of coverage about Detroit’s “comeback.” Stores and restaurants are opening, and downtown is more vibrant than its been in decades.

But the story of the city’s rise from the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history often leaves out residents in the city's neighborhoods, who often aren't getting a chance to share in the prosperity.   

In preparation for the November elections, Stateside has been sitting down with the candidates for Michigan governor. 

Michigan's Lt. Governor Brian Calley is one of those candidates.

Reporters and activists have been piecing together information on a couple of political organizations funded by Consumer's Energy. Those organizations have been targeting politicians who support opening up the energy market in Michigan. 

Stateside 6.12.2018

Jun 12, 2018

Today on Stateside, a watchdog group finds that one of Michigan's biggest utility companies is hitting back at politicians pushing for a more open energy market by funding their opponents. Plus, women in a Washtenaw County prison build new skills and find parallels to their own lives performing Shakespeare's Macbeth. 

 


Malaria is incredibly common across the world in mammals, birds, and reptiles. So it's not surprising that birds in Michigan, just like birds elsewhere, suffer from a variety of malaria-causing parasites. 

What is surprising is just how many blood parasites you find in birds with malaria. 

A new study published in the journal Parasitology Research discovered a far greater range of blood parasites than expected in birds tested in southwest Michigan. 

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