School Bonds

Dan Wanschura

Elections were held across Michigan on Tuesday, and school bonds were on many ballots.

Unofficial election results show that school bonds in Ludington and Leland passed, but a $47.8 million proposal for Benzie County Central Schools narrowly failed by 114 votes, or just under 2 percentage points. Another proposal in Kingsley Area Schools overwhelmingly failed with 73 percent of voters saying ‘no.’

Ludington Area School District

School districts across Michigan have bond proposals going to a vote on May 7.

Ludington Area Schools district is asking the community for a new elementary building, renovations to the middle and high school and improvements to technology, transportation, arts and athletic facilities.  

District Superintendent Jason Kennedy says the district needs signficant renovations.

"The average age of the facilities in Ludington is 64 years old," Kennedy says. "We need to consider doing more than just fixing and repairing the facilities."

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, after school bonds fail, some districts keep asking taxpayers again and again to change their minds. One small district in northern Michigan is renewing their attempt. Plus, more religious discrimination allegations against Bay View and local musicians play a violin that made it through the Holocaust.


Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Dozens of school districts across the state will put bond proposals to voters next month. They are asking residents to pay for improvements in schools, but in some small communities in northern Michigan, a tax hike for your schools can be a tough sell.

Ludington Area Schools will put a bond before voters for new buildings and major renovations. The school board moved forward with a $101 million proposal this week.

Mesick school bond goes before voters a third time

Oct 25, 2018
Mesick Consolidated Schools

UPDATED Oct. 31, 2 p.m.  This story has been updated to clarify the cost of the proposed millage, which would add an extra $480 to the property tax bill on a home with a state equalized value of $100,000. State equalized value is 50 percent of the market value of a property.

On election day, Mesick residents will vote on a $14 million school bond. This will be the third time the bond proposal has gone before voters. It was rejected in 2017 and then again in May, when it failed by only 10 votes.

District officials hope this time around, more people will turn out to vote for the bond. Superintendent Scott Akom says most of the money would go toward building a new elementary school wing onto the high school.

Morgan Springer

School districts across Michigan are asking voters for more money for building renovations and equipment. More than 20 bond proposals are on ballots Tuesday, May 8. A number of those districts are trying again after bond proposals failed in previous elections.

Mesick Consolidated Schools District website

School officials in Mesick say they need $14.5 million to demolish, rebuild and upgrade their schools. Residents in the district will vote on the millage in May.

Elk Rapids School Bond Denied Again

Feb 26, 2014

Voters have rejected Elk Rapids Public Schools’ bond for the second time in four months. The $10.9 million bond was for a new gym, security and athletic upgrades.

Elk Rapids superintendent Steve Prissel is disappointed with yesterday’s outcome.

"We have a supportive community when it comes to education. We know that," he says. "However, the voters spoke and there's not support for capital projects."

erschools.com

Last November, almost half the schools in Michigan were unsuccessful at getting voters to approve their bond proposals. That included Kalkaska, Traverse City and Elk Rapids, all of which lost by a narrow margin. Elk Rapids Public Schools is back with the exact same proposal—$10.9 million over 20 years—on next week’s ballot.

Seventh grader Rebecca Marolf is excited about the idea of a new gymnasium. She’s with her dad at the Elk Rapids High School boys’ basketball game. The Cherryland Middle School student thinks the district needs another gym.