no fault auto insurance

Thousands rally at the state Capitol against the state’s new auto insurance law.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Thousands rallied at the state Capitol Wednesday against Michigan’s auto insurance law. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed sweeping changes to the law in May that ended requirements for everyone to have unlimited, lifetime medical benefits for catastrophic car accidents.

 


 

Today on Stateside, Michigan bean farmers send a lot of exports to Mexico. So, what happens to those farmers if President Trump follows through on his threats to add tariffs to Mexican goods? Plus, we hear about a tricked out bicycle with accordion and percussion instruments that blends classical music and public art. 

Today on Stateside, the Michigan House and Senate both passed bills this week that would allow drivers to opt out of the unlimited medical benefits mandated by current law. But critics say that giving up those benefits would do more harm than good. Plus, we talk to the author of a murder mystery novel that takes place on a fictional Michigan university campus.

Today on Stateside, we talk with Congresswoman Debbie Dingell about efforts to halt the deportation of Mexican journalist and University of Michigan Knight-Wallace Fellow Emilio Gutierrez Soto. Plus, we check in with Wayne County Executive Warren Evans about the state of the county's finances.

Listen above for the full show, or find individual segments below.

Michigan's no-fault auto insurance law is seen as the "gold standard" in this country in terms of medical care for drivers badly hurt in a car accident.

Michigan also has the highest insurance costs in the nation, and although various fixes have been floated through the years, nothing gets traction in the state legislature.

Why does Michigan have some of the highest auto insurance premiums in the nation?

Crain’s Detroit Business and Bridge Magazine dug into the heart of the question that affects every single driver in our state by analyzing insurance data over a 14 year span. They found that repairing people costs a whole lot more than repairing cars. Most of your auto insurance now goes to PIP, or Personal Injury Protection.

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The state legislature held a marathon committee hearing on a bill to overhaul Michigan’s auto insurance law Tuesday. The committee heard ideas for potential changes to the bill. 

One idea is to prevent insurance companies from using credit scores to influence rates.

Michigan’s auto no-fault insurance will be a hot topic this week.

Michigan’s auto insurance rates are among the highest in the country. Right now there are competing plans among legislators aimed at attacking this problem. One focuses on getting rid of the requirement for unlimited medical benefits for catastrophic injuries from car crashes. Instead, it would allow drivers to cap those benefits at specific amounts or keep the unlimited benefit. That bill, HB 5013, has a committee hearing Tuesday.

An unlikely alliance has formed to overhaul Michigan’s auto no-fault system. Speaker of the House Tom Leonard (R-DeWitt) and Detroit’s mayor Mike Duggan met Tuesday. They say the goal is to bring rate relief to all Michigan drivers.

There’s no word yet on what the plan says about people with catastrophic injuries from car crashes. Right now Michigan is the only state in the US that provides unlimited medical benefits for people in those accidents.

Detroiters pay some of the highest auto insurance rates of anyone in the country. A significant share of the city’s residents do not make enough to pay for continuous insurance coverage. That presents problems when it comes time to get a vehicle registered.

As a result, many have turned to a legal workaround called 7-day auto insurance. Now, that loophole may be closing.