News

Your connection to northern Michigan news.

Wikimedia Commons

Amidst congressional negotiations on border security, lawmakers are trying to protect Great Lakes infrastructure projects that could be caught up in the debate.

The state Attorney General is working with lawmakers to make sure the wrongfully imprisoned are compensated.

Today on Stateside, a Princeton study makes recommendations for how Michigan's new citizen commission should redraw the state's political maps for the 2022 election. Plus, a look at why Michigan State University is refusing to hand over 6,000 internal documents to special investigators. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

The ever-smitten Hermes empty left

His golden throne, bent warm on amorous theft:

From high Olympus he had stolen light,

On this side of Jove's clouds, to escape the sight

Of his great summoner, and made retreat

Into a forest on the shores of Crete.

These few lines are from John Keats' poetic narrative "Lamia", and they describe how the trickster god, Hermes, the bringer of dreams and escort of souls, who also serves as the messenger divine, escaped the heaven world for Earth, in search of the beloved.

Today on Stateside, Congressman John Dingell passed away Thursday. Two of his longtime friends from across the aisle, U.S. Rep. Fred Upton and Detroit News columnist Nolan Finley, reflect on the legacy of “the Dean.” Plus, Republicans push back against Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s attempts to restructure the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. And we end the week with a cocktail that sounds like spring, but tastes like winter citrus.

A new report says the State of Michigan did not thoroughly review Enbridge’s ability to cover costs in the case of a spill from its twin Line 5 oil pipelines before it signed an agreement with the company. The pipelines run underneath the Straits of Mackinac.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s plans to restructure the state Department of Environmental Quality could be over.

Essay: Saying Hello

Feb 8, 2019

I am leaving a store when I notice the woman in front of me. There is something familiar in her walk and then I know who she is—a friend from long ago.


TC skier finds healing on the trails

Feb 8, 2019
Roger Hagerman

Many of the best cross-country skiers in Michigan will line up in Traverse City this weekend for the 43rd annual North American Vasa ski races.

One of those skiers is local resident Anders Gillis, who won the 34-kilometer classic race last year. 

Anders was not always in shape for a ski marathon. After a personal tragedy, the lifelong athlete fell into depression and put on significant weight. 


Wikimedia Commons

Anglers across Michigan won’t be able to catch as many perch. Right now they can get 50 per day but this spring it will be 25.

Randy Claramunt with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources says perch populations have been declining for decades.

"There’s a lot of pressure on them in specific areas," Claramunt says. "So this … recognizes the value that yellow perch are to anglers in Michigan."

Claramunt says anglers pushed for the change because it may increase perch numbers. The new limit takes effect on April 1.

Today on Stateside, new work requirements for Michigan Medicaid recipients are set to go into effect in 2020. A new study out of Arkansas gives an idea of the potential consequences for healthcare coverage in the state. Plus, the challenges that first-generation and minority students face in college, and a Grand Rapids program that wants to help them get “to and through” college.

Grand Traverse County Commissioners
Taylor Wizner

 

After passing a much debated prayer policy, the Grand Traverse County Commission started its first meeting of February with an invocation. 

Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s executive order to restructure the Department of Environmental Quality could be overturned before any changes are made. 

The U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Highway Administration has given western Upper Peninsula counties a grant to rebuild flood-damaged roads.

USER: ADAMSHOOP / FLICKER

Researchers at Michigan Technological University will pump water down mine shafts in the Upper Peninsula, spinning hydroelectric turbines along the way.

Roman Sidortsov, professor of Energy Policy at Michigan Tech, says that could generate renewable energy. Sidortsov says the UP relies on importing electricity that comes from fossil fuels, but this research could provide a homegrown alternative for the region.

"You can basically start developing your own energy," Sidortsov says. "[These] kinds of installations do generate quite a bit of economic activity."

Today on Stateside, what you need to know about the thousands of white-collar GM workers losing their jobs today. Plus, a recent study finds that firearms are the second leading cause of death among children and teens in the United States, killing eight young people every day. 

We're halfway through the Winter now, but if the cold of the season has you down, then it's time to lift your spirits with a hunt for the unicorn ~ in the stars!

The constellation of the unicorn is known as Monoceros, and though it is made up of faint stars, you can still find it mounting to its highest place right now, straddling the Milky Way while it frolics in the company of some of our brightest stars. This is in keeping with its legendary status as a symbol of undivivded sovereign power and its role as guardian of the Tree of Life.

Today on Stateside, bitter cold during this week’s polar vortex, combined with a fire at a Consumers Energy natural gas plant, led to an energy crisis. What does that tell us about the state of our energy infrastructure? Plus, remembering the Saginaw-born woman who revolutionized workplace design and helped usher in the era of the open office.

Max Johnston

Homeless shelters and nonprofits are getting headcounts of the homeless across the country this month. The data goes to the federal government for homelessness prevention. But this year's count in northern Michigan happened to fall on one of the coldest nights of the year.

Essay: My House

Feb 1, 2019

When I die, I will leave the people I love which makes me sad.  But what really bothers me—and I confess this with a certain embarrassment—is leaving my house.  As a house, it’s not that special—an old, two-story, needs-work place—but as a source of shelter and security, it has never let me down.  I can’t say that about people.


Today on Stateside, we find out why Michigan utilities asked customers to turn down their heat during record-breaking cold weather in the Midwest. Plus, a new report finds Michigan State University violated federal campus safety laws. The report also includes new information about MSU officials who were told about Larry Nassar's abuse and failed to report it to authorities. 

If you think your propane provider is unfairly raising your rates during the cold snap, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel wants you to notify her office. 

Today on Stateside, we check in with a fire department, an animal rescue group, and homeless advocates to see what work is like for them during the record-setting cold weather. We also talk with an artist whose first large-scale museum exhibition was inspired by her time in Flint. 

TheraCann

Lake Superior State University is offering what they call the nation’s first 'Cannabis Chemistry' degrees.

For example students can take classes on the preparation and hydration of cannabis, also known as marijuana, as part of their degree. University President Rodney Hanley says the curriculum is no joke.

“This is not a slouchy education that you get here, and it’s certainly not some stereotyped thing around cannabis or something like that," Hanley says. "This is very much a high-quality, analytical chemistry program.”

Joebart/flickr; licensed under CC BY 2.0

At Gary Michalek’s house, food scraps don’t go into the trash can. Kitchen waste goes into the worm bin. The master gardener from Benzie County does vermicomposting – a technique that uses earthworms to recycle food scraps into nutrient-rich humus. Michalek says the recycled soil is like fertilizer on steroids.

 

 


Pages