Marijuana

 

Today on Stateside, the potential of the cannabis compound CBD as a treatment for people with chronic pain. Plus, a new study says the tax incentives states use to lure businesses might not be paying off. 

 


Today on Stateside, debate was heated as Republican state lawmakers passed bills banning an abortion procedure known as "dilation and evacuation." Plus, Michigan's next state superintendent talks about what he sees as the most pressing issues facing Michigan schools. 

Today on Stateside, the interim president of Michigan State University has publically apologized to survivors of sexual abuse by former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar. At a Friday meeting, those survivors told the Board of Trustees that apologies aren’t enough. Plus, documenting the architectural creatures that watch over Detroit.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

Nassar survivors tell MSU trustees that apologies are not enough  

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, local governments across Michigan aren't letting recreational marijuana businesses open in city limits. But residents in one village Up North are trying to overrule their local government's decision – something that could set a precedent statewide. Plus, a look at one northern Michigan tribe’s maple sugaring operation. 


Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Recreational marijuana was legalized in Michigan this year, but many cities across the state aren’t letting marijuana businesses operate. Some officials argue that the state hasn’t figured out how to regulate them yet.

But a small community in northern Michigan is in the middle of a legal and political debate that could set a precedent for the rest of the state.

Max Pixel

State lawmakers want to put in place a final deadline for medical marijuana facilities to get a license, or not be able to stay open.

A state House committee unanimously passed a bill Wednesday. It gives a June 1st deadline for facilities – and if they stay open without a license, the facility can’t get a license for a year.

Today on Stateside, a report from a state commission says that the state's trial court funding system is "broken." Plus, we talk to the producers of a documentary about CREEM, a Detroit-based rock n' roll magazine that rivaled Rolling Stone during the 1970s and 1980s. 

TheraCann

Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is the chemical in marijuana that gets you high. For a long time in Michigan, you could face criminal charges for driving with it in your system.

Health Department says no more CBD oil in drinks

Mar 13, 2019
CBD oil
Wikimedia Commons

 

The Grand Traverse County Health Department is telling coffee shops to stop serving Cannabidiol (CBD)-infused drinks. So far they’ve sent cease and desist letters to three cafes that served CBD-infused lattes: Espresso Bay, Black Market and Cuppa Joe.

CBD is a derivative of cannabis without the psychotropic effects of the drug.

Dan Thorell with the Grand Traverse County Health Department says CBD oil is still new, so many people don't know the rules.

Today on Stateside, the former special assistant attorney general for the state’s Flint water investigation shares his concerns over Attorney General Dana Nessel's decision to remove an independent legal counsel from that investigation. Plus, a co-founder of the recently-established Anishinaabek Caucus within the Michigan Democratic Party talks about the issues of concern to native voters. 

TheraCann

Lake Superior State University is offering what they call the nation’s first 'Cannabis Chemistry' degrees.

For example students can take classes on the preparation and hydration of cannabis, also known as marijuana, as part of their degree. University President Rodney Hanley says the curriculum is no joke.

“This is not a slouchy education that you get here, and it’s certainly not some stereotyped thing around cannabis or something like that," Hanley says. "This is very much a high-quality, analytical chemistry program.”

THERACANN

Traverse City won't allow recreational marijuana businesses in city limits.

The state hasn't finalized the licensing regulations for recreational marijuana businesses yet.

TheraCann

Cities across northern Michigan are considering temporary bans on recreational marijuana dispensaries. Recreational marijuana becomes legal in Michigan on Thursday.

 


Michigan residents will vote on the legalization of recreational marijuana November 9. 

The state has strict laws against driving while drunk, and cops can test how intoxicated someone is with a quick breathalyzer test. 

But if weed is legalized, how will law enforcement identify someone who is driving while high? 

On Monday, the Food and Drug Administration made history. For the first time, the agency approved a hemp-derived product for use in treating epilepsy. 

The decision comes as more and more Michigan farmers and researchers have their eye on producing hemp for commercial and medical uses. 

People who want a license to grow or sell medical marijuana in Michigan have yet more uncertainty to deal with when it comes to getting licensed.

 

TheraCann

A Canadian company that wanted to build a $20 million medical marijuana facility in Kingsley has changed its plans. TheraCann says it still wants to do business in Michigan - just not in Kingsley.

Michigan residents who want to get into the medical marijuana business had their last shot at a training session Wednesday.

State employees took people step by step through the application process. They also explained the monitoring system for tracking marijuana from seed-to-sale.

David Harns is a spokesperson for the state Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs. It oversees the medical marijuana licensing system. Harns says the trainings were meant to help make the application process as easy as possible.

Kingsley OK's medical marijuana facility

Nov 14, 2017
TheraCann

Kingsley is the latest Michigan town to give the green light to medical marijuana businesses. A vote by the village council this week clears the way for TheraCann, a Canadian company that wants to build a $20 million marijuana facility in the Kingsley Industry Park.

The building would be right next to Marc McKellar's house.

“Frankly, I’ve never been a proponent of marijuana … whatsoever," says McKellar. "I never contemplated it, really. Never thought about it.”

Lawmakers in Lansing say they want a seamless transition as marijuana dispensaries start to get licensed.

Democrats in the House and Senate introduced legislation today (Wed). A few Republicans have voiced support of the bills. The legislation would let dispensaries keep their doors open while they wait for a license.

Brett Levin

Leaders in Traverse City are taking a “wait and see” approach to changing the city’s marijuana laws.

At a meeting Monday night, the city commission discussed how it might adapt to new marijuana regulations coming from the State of Michigan.

Michigan continues to wrestle with how to regulate and license medical marijuana dispensaries.

But there’s a potentially bigger issue facing the budding cannabis industry: the prospect that someone is trying to build a national monopoly on legal weed.

Medical marijuana dispensaries need to close their doors or risk being denied a license – once the state starts issuing them.

On Tuesday the state’s licensing department gave the dispensaries a December 15th deadline. December 15th is also when the state board will start accepting applications for licenses.

Andrew Brisbo is with the Bureau of Medical Marijuana Regulation. He said three months should be long enough for patients to find alternatives.

A state licensing board could decide Tuesday whether marijuana dispensaries in Michigan should get to stay open.

The Medical Marijuana Licensing Board is expected to start issuing licenses in December. In the meantime, some board members have signaled that existing dispensaries should have to close in order to qualify.

The state’s licensing department plans to speak at the meeting.

Andrew Brisbo is with the Bureau of Medical Marijuana Regulation in the state’s licensing department. He said the bureau wants to make sure patients have safe access to medical marijuana.

In December, the state will start accepting applications for medical marijuana shops to get licenses. But meanwhile, there’s a dispute over how to deal with the dispensaries that are already open.

The state’s medical marijuana licensing board Monday considered whether dispensaries should have to close their doors before they can get a license. At least two board members want dispensaries that are already open to close next month – or risk being denied a license.

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