death

Courtesty of Theresa Schurman

This week on Points North, a hunter was shot and killed by another hunter on opening day of deer hunting season last fall. It was ruled an accident, but it became apparent there was more to the story. Plus, the bond between a hunter and his dog.


Courtesty of Theresa Schurman

Last year, two people were shot and killed in Michigan while deer hunting. One of the victims, Justin Beutel, was hunting on family property near Torch Lake. 

It was Nov. 15, opening day of firearm deer hunting season, when another hunter shot Beutel from about 50 yards away. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources investigated the case. 

“We would classify it as an accident at this point,” says Lt. Jim Gorno, a DNR conservation officer.

CREDIT SKEEZE/PIXABAY

The man responsible for shooting another hunter near Torch Lake has been charged with involuntary manslaughter. David Michael Barber of Gaylord was arraigned in court Friday.

The investigation into a deer hunter’s death is wrapping up. Justin Beutel was shot and killed near Torch Lake by another hunter on opening day. 

Michigan Department of Natural Resources officials say they still can't offer many details about the incident, but evidence points toward a hunting accident. They believe the other hunter mistook Beutel for a deer. Lietenant Jim Gorno, a DNR conservation officer, says Beutel was a relative of the property owner.

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A deer hunter has been killed in northern Michigan. Justin Beutel of Sanford was shot Thursday afternoon. He was killed while hunting near Torch Lake in Antrim County.

Antrim County

It’s been five months since a special prosecutor was asked to review a suicide at the Grand Traverse County jail. 

Alan Halloway hanged himself in the jail nearly a year ago. It took three hours for officers to find Halloway after he died; they were supposed to check on him every hour. 

An earlier investigation by the Michigan Sheriff’s Association found that two corrections officers did not follow jail policies and procedures; both officer no longer work there.

Ruth Wolfgram is a psychic medium from Interlochen.
Ruth Wolfgram

 

Ruth Wolfgram is 62 years old, has five grandchildren, loves gardening - and talks to dead people. 

She been a psychic medium since she was a child.

Ruth lives on her farm in Interlochen. It’s where she runs her small business, Celestial Blessings. She helps people make sense of death and suffering.

“People want hope,” says Ruth. “They want to know their loved ones and friends are all right especially if it was a tragic death.” 

She’s helped reconnect countless parents with their children, lovers with their partners and even pets with their owners.  

 


 

All this week on Stateside, in our series Living with Death, we're talking to people about how the process of death and dying has changed.

Today we talk about what changes the mortuary science field has experienced.

We know it’s inevitable, but death is not something that all people come to embrace. For those working in the profession of mortuary sciences, it is a fact of daily life.

His former boss remarked that Bill Bonds could "read the telephone book and make you pay attention." The legendary Detroit TV anchor died over the weekend at age 82.

We’re coming up on an anniversary this weekend. It’s probably not one you’ve noted before. On Dec. 14, 1799, the nation’s first president, George Washington, died at his home, Mount Vernon.

It was not an easy death, primarily because of the medical treatments he was given. Dr. Howard Markel is a physician and medical historian at the University of Michigan and he’s written an essay about that.

Linda Stephan

At Interlochen Public Radio, we first met Mike and Stacey Fekete at their Benzie County home last spring, when their grief for their son was very raw. Jake Fekete had died only weeks before of a drug overdose. His family believes Jake was trying to medicate his depression with drugs that had not been prescribed for him.

His parents shared their story as part of an Interlochen Public Radio series looking at the community response to a number of drug-related deaths in the close-knit county. 

Brittany Maynard ended her life over the weekend.

The spirited newlywed with the aggressive, terminal brain tumor had moved from California to Oregon to take advantage of that state's law that made physician-assisted suicide legal.

Millions watched her video and read the stories about her choice to end her life on her terms, not cancer's terms.

Brittany Maynard was 29 years old.

Could her story give new impetus to right-to-die movements in other states, including here in Michigan?

Dr. Maria Silveira is an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan. She is a specialist in palliative care and medical ethics.