Stateside

Monday-Thursday, 3pm on IPR News
  • Hosted by Cynthia Canty

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. The show is a production of our partner Michigan Radio. It focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

 

Today on Stateside, an update on the partnership agreements school districts signed with the state to avoid school closures in 2017. Plus, we talk to our Friday political commentators about the recent indictment of state Representative Larry Inman (R-Traverse City), and the effect of “dark money” on the public's trust in government.

 

Today on Stateside, Right to Life of Michigan has a plan to work around Governor Whitmer's promised veto of controversial abortion bills recently passed by the state House and Senate. Plus, we talk to Joshua Johnson of NPR’s 1A, who’s been broadcasting from Michigan Radio this week.

 


Today on Stateside, debate was heated as Republican state lawmakers passed bills banning an abortion procedure known as "dilation and evacuation." Plus, Michigan's next state superintendent talks about what he sees as the most pressing issues facing Michigan schools. 

Today on Stateside, the Michigan Department of Corrections has hired a mental health specialist to run an employee mental wellness program in response to concerns about stress and suicides among corrections officers. Plus, how a design firm streamlined Michigan's long and confusing government assistance application using “human-centric design.”

Today on Stateside, the Michigan House and Senate both passed bills this week that would allow drivers to opt out of the unlimited medical benefits mandated by current law. But critics say that giving up those benefits would do more harm than good. Plus, we talk to the author of a murder mystery novel that takes place on a fictional Michigan university campus.

Today on Stateside, a Wayne State University law professor remembers Judge Damon Keith, the longest-serving black judge in American history who died Sunday at age 96. Plus, why the popular flower baby’s breath poses a threat to the coastal sand dunes of the Great Lakes.

Today on Stateside, a federal court rules that Michigan must redraw its congressional and legislative maps before the 2020 election. How does that change both parties’ political calculus? Plus, a Michigan spin on a classic cocktail to warm you up on a drizzly spring weekend.

 


Today on Stateside, Vice President Mike Pence comes to Detroit to whip up support for the new North American trade deal, even as automakers nervously eye President Trump's threatened tariffs. Plus, student robotics team from around the world descend on Detroit this week for the 2019 FIRST Robotics Championship.

Today on Stateside, a Saginaw case led to a federal appeals court ruling that chalking tires to track how long a car has been parked is unconstitutional. Plus, we talk to the high school student who will be representing Michigan at the national Poetry Out Loud competition in D.C.

Today on Stateside, a conversation with the head of Michigan’s environmental agency on its recent rebranding, and on changing a culture some have accused of being too cozy with corporate interests. Plus, we check in with Antonio Espree, one of Michigan’s so-called “juvenile lifers,” about what it’s like to restart his life after 30 years behind bars.

Today on Stateside, as General Motors prepares to close the company's Detroit-Hamtramck plant, how is the city of Hamtramck preparing for life after GM? Plus, a treasure trove of Anishinaabe art from Michigan is now on permanent display in Vienna, Austria.

 


Today on StatesideGovernor Whitmer reopens talks with Enbridge about a tunnel to house replacement pipelines for Line 5. But environmental groups want the current Line 5 shut down before moving forward on plans for its replacement. Plus, park officials say the thousands of shards of glass found on a beach at the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore were likely placed there intentionally. 

Today on Stateside, how are Michigan schools preparing for active shooter situations? And what role does the state play in tracking efforts to make schools safer? Plus, Michigan State University's historic role in the divestment movement of the 1970s, and why students there are calling for greater transparency about their school's current investments.

Today on Stateside, does a new pretrial risk assessment tool aimed at helping judges answer complex pretrial questions help or hurt defendants? Plus, we talk to an expert about the spotted lanternfly, a destructive invasive insect that could be making its way to Michigan. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Today on Stateside, the interim president of Michigan State University has publically apologized to survivors of sexual abuse by former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar. At a Friday meeting, those survivors told the Board of Trustees that apologies aren’t enough. Plus, documenting the architectural creatures that watch over Detroit.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

Nassar survivors tell MSU trustees that apologies are not enough  

 

Today on Stateside, we talk with vaccine-hesitant parents as measles cases spread. Plus, learn how your old photos can help researchers track changes to Lake Michigan's dunes.

Today on Stateside, around 1,000 Iraqi nationals are in danger of deportation starting Tuesday after a federal appeals court decision ruled that Immigration and Customs Enforcement could move forward with trying to send them back to Iraq. Plus, we talk to a corrections officer a Jackson prison that has lost four officers to suicide in the past two years about how to better support prison staff who are grappling with mental health issues.

Today on Stateside, a report from a state commission says that the state's trial court funding system is "broken." Plus, we talk to the producers of a documentary about CREEM, a Detroit-based rock n' roll magazine that rivaled Rolling Stone during the 1970s and 1980s. 

 


Today on Stateside, what would a closure of the U.S.-Mexico border mean for Michigan's economy? Plus, how two Saginaw women in the 1930s designed a product to make keeping the house "Spic and Span" a little easier. 

Today on Stateside, three cardiologists are suing the Detroit Medical Center, citing alleged fraud and concerns over quality of care. We get the latest from the Detroit News reporter who has been following this story. Plus, we talk to staff at two small-town Michigan newspapers about what communities have to lose when local news sources go out of business. 

Today on Stateside, Governor Whitmer last week ordered state agencies to stop working on a proposed tunnel intended to house replacement pipelines for Enbridge's Line 5. We hear about the legal opinion from Dana Nessel that prompted that order, and how Republican lawmakers are reacting to the news. Plus, a conversation with the paleontologist who worked to unearth Spinosaurus, the largest predatory dinosaur ever discovered. 

Today on Stateside, we talk to our Friday political commentators about Governor Whitmer’s move to have Michigan set its own PFAS standard. Plus, a composer tackles the trauma of sexual abuse and the resilience of survivors in a new symphony.

 


Today on Stateside, Governor Whitmer orders an audit of the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association after it hikes the yearly fee on auto insurance policies by 15 percent. Plus, we explore two important pieces of our state's African-American history housed at the Library of Michigan.

Today on Stateside, Congressman Dan Kildee (D-Flint) tells us about a newly-introduced House bill that aims to improve the Affordable Care Act, even as the Trump Administration is pushing to repeal the health care law. Plus, how the adoption system is failing children with darker skin, and how to fix it. 

Today on Stateside, we speak with two Oakland County public health officials about the measles outbreak there, and what residents can do to protect themselves and their children. Plus, a look at proposed reforms to Michigan's guardianship system for elderly and incapacitated adults. 

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