Morning Edition

Monday-Friday, 5am-9am on Classical IPR
  • Hosted by Daniel Wanschura, David Greene, Steve Inskeep, Noel King, and Rachel Martin
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Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition. Hosts David Greene, Steve Inskeep, Noel King, and Rachel Martin bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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The top three security chiefs in Congress resigned after Wednesday's attack. And authorities are working to strengthen security before Inauguration Day. Daniella Cheslow reports from member station WAMU.

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Democratic Senator Debbie Stabenow of Michigan is one of the lawmakers who's calling for President Trump's removal. She's on the line with me now. Good morning, Senator.

DEBBIE STABENOW: Good morning. Good to be with you.

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What is the appropriate response to a president who incited a violent mob and who is taking no responsibility for it? Yesterday, Trump condemned the attack on the capital, but he never mentioned the role that he played.

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In more than four decades of music, Barry Gibb and his brothers Robin and Maurice created almost too many hits to count as the pop powerhouse the Bee Gees. Today, at 74, Barry is the last living Gibb brother, and has continued on as a solo artist. If you've only ever associated his name with the disco era, his new album may surprise you: It turns out that the musician, who emigrated from the U.K. to Australia when he and his brothers were kids, has always been a big fan of American country music.

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2021 was supposed to be better than 2020, and right now, that's looking questionable. But there are some good things coming our way, like new music.

Before Julie Andrews first sang "A Spoonful of Sugar," its songwriter found inspiration for the iconic Mary Poppins tune in an unlikely place.

The late Robert B. Sherman wrote it with his brother, Richard; many of the duo's songs are featured in classic Walt Disney films. At StoryCorps last month, Robert's son, Jeffrey, said that it was telling his father about getting the polio vaccine as a child that sparked the lyrics for the famous song.

Jeffrey, now 63, said his dad had a way with words.

Health experts warned that the coronavirus pandemic would get worse before it got better. And that is happening. December was the deadliest month of the pandemic in the United States. The vaccines have made people optimistic, but the process has been slow.

Dr. Anthony Fauci — head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, who will be President-elect Joe Biden's chief medical adviser — said Thursday that the initial rollout of COVID-19 vaccines has been slow because it came during the holiday period.

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Our next guest was sworn into Congress for the first time on Sunday. Her first week has included the assault on the U.S. Capitol. Republican Nancy Mace of South Carolina is on the line. Congresswoman, good morning.

NANCY MACE: Good morning.

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Congressman Jack Bergman (R-Watersmeet) is safe and sheltering in place in the nation's Capitol during violent clashes between far-right protestors and law enforcement, according to a spokesman.

On social media Bergman denounced the attacks from far-right supporters of President Donald Trump.

Lake Michigan is lower than it was at this point last year, but still 31 inches above its long-term average.
Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

All five of the Great Lakes closed out 2020 at lower levels than they were a year ago. But according to new projections from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the upper lakes are still expected to remain high in 2021.


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Reverend Raphael Warnock made history overnight. He won his Senate runoff election against Republican Kelly Loeffler. He will be Georgia's first Black senator. And he's on the line with me now. Good morning, Reverend Warnock.

RAPHAEL WARNOCK: Good morning. Great to be here with you.

KING: To what do you attribute your win? And what do you think it says about Georgia?

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If you're looking to buy a new handbag, some cognac or a lipstick, you could be looking at higher prices. That's because the Trump administration is putting new tariffs on goods from Europe.

NPR's Scott Horsley explains why.

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A Preview Of New Music To Start Off 2021

Jan 6, 2021

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A new year means new music, and the NPR Music team is sharing some of the albums they are most excited about.

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A question that is on a lot of people's minds, why is this country's vaccine campaign moving so slowly and can we do anything about it? NPR health correspondent, Rob Stein has been looking into that. Hi, Rob.

ROB STEIN, BYLINE: Good morning, Noel.

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