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Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition. Hosts David Greene, Steve Inskeep, Noel King, and Rachel Martin bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

 

Phones ringing non-stop. Websites crashing. Appointment slots filled within hours. Eligible teachers, front line workers, and senior citizens in northern Michigan all want to know when they can get their COVID-19 vaccine.

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Up to a dozen House Republicans are likely to join Democrats on Wednesday in voting to impeach President Trump for inciting the attack on the U.S. Capitol one week ago, predicts Rep. Elissa Slotkin, a Democrat from Michigan.

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Good morning. I'm Tonya Mosley.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE JETSONS")

JEAN VANDER PYL: (As Rosie) Come and get it.

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Today, the House of Representatives will vote to impeach President Trump again.

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Updated at 12:27 p.m. ET

Casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, one of the most prolific donors in conservative politics, died Monday night at the age of 87 due to complications from treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, according to a statement from Las Vegas Sands, the company he founded.

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We know there are some Americans who are hesitant to get vaccinated. So there's this idea out there to give them money to encourage them, and it's supported by a number of economists and politicians - essentially, a government cash-for-shots program. But there are those who do say it could backfire. NPR's Uri Berliner has more.

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It's a new year, and hopefully that means a lot of new great music is coming our way. We've asked some of our colleagues at NPR Music to highlight a few of the albums that they're looking forward to.

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Sleeping Bear Inn exterior
Balancing Environment and Rehabilitation

A historic Inn located on the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore will begin renovations in anticipation of a reopening next summer.

 

The Sleeping Bear Inn was built in the mid-1860’s and closed to the public in the 1970’s.


Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Millions of people are relying on food pantries during the pandemic. In rural spots Up North, that means long lines at cash-strapped facilities.

And that can be especially hard for people with diabetes.

As part of IPR's new series Our Lives Have Changed, meet a man whose life has been upended by the demand on food pantries.


The first New Moon of the New Year happens this week, overnight Tuesday to Wednesday, but not before shedding its old light into the lap of love as a way to make ready for what lies ahead.


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In 2021, I'm looking forward to, fingers crossed, live music. I really miss the roar of a symphony orchestra in concert or a soaring soprano on the opera stage. But artists are still making albums, even in lockdown, like British composer Max Richter. His upcoming album is a follow-up to last year's Voices. This new one is Voices, Part 2 which will be released in April.

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(SOUNDBITE OF RIOT)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Give this to us. This is our Capitol.

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U.S. employers cut 140,000 jobs in December as the runaway coronavirus pandemic continued to weigh on the U.S. labor market.

It was the first monthly job loss in eight months. The unemployment rate held steady at 6.7%.

With thousands of Americans dying from COVID-19 each day, businesses that depend on in-person contact have struggled.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska is on the line. The Republican was one of those in the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday when rioters attacked. When Congress reconvened, Sasse gave a speech saying, quote, "Lies have consequences," said the attack on the Capitol was the inevitable and ugly outcome of the president's addiction to constantly stoking division. And then Sasse voted to affirm the election results.

Senator, welcome back to the program.

BEN SASSE: Thanks for having me on, Steve.

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