Morning Edition

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  • Hosted by Daniel Wanschura, David Greene, Steve Inskeep, Noel King, and Rachel Martin
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Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition. Hosts David Greene, Steve Inskeep, Noel King, and Rachel Martin bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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So what is the Trump administration's move mean for recipients of DACA? Let's ask Ken Cuccinelli, the acting deputy secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Mr. Cuccinelli, welcome back to the program.

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A coalition of health professionals is urging the nation's leaders to step back from the push to reopen the economy and shut down nonessential businesses to prevent the loss of more lives from the spiraling pandemic.

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So this country has corrected an oversight three-quarters of a century old. The correction came just in time for a handful of remaining men from one of the Second World War's best units. Jay Price of member station WUNC reports.

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With less than 100 days until the 2020 presidential election, Ohio's 18 electoral votes are in play.

The state went for President Trump in 2016, and Ashtabula County is one reason why.

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All right. So executives from Amazon, Apple, Facebook, also Google are going to be facing lawmakers today.

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At the age of 80, you'd think some might be slowing down a little bit but not one famous rabbit.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "A WILD HARE")

MEL BLANC: (As Bugs Bunny) What's up, doc?

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So here's how the top Senate Republican is describing his party's latest plan to help Americans.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Joshua Stevens, NASA Earth Observatory

 

If you took a dip in Lake Michigan in early July you might have noticed the water felt pretty nice.

Updated at 7:19 p.m. ET

Jeff Bezos is a man of many firsts. On Wednesday, he'll face a new one: his first appearance before Congress.

In a hearing via video with other major tech CEOs, lawmakers will grill Amazon's founder about the reach of his company, the rules it sets for workers and the power imbalance with other sellers on its platform.

Back in March, California was among the first round of states to issue a stay-at-home order. It was held up as an example of the power of early action.

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Here is how the top Senate Republican is describing his party's latest plan to help Americans.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Cassidy Hough

Steve Smith has explored old caves ever since he was a kid — usually illegally.

 Now he just does it legally.

 

“Listen to the water dripping, and bats, and you can smell the timbers and almost visualize what the miners were going through. I have a passion for this.” 

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The students are met at the school door with a thermometer and a health quiz, answering questions like "Are you feeling sick today?"

Once they pass this quiz, the students in this summer enrichment program outside St. Louis proceed to folding chairs spread 10 feet apart across the gymnasium to eat breakfast alone.

Eating so far from friends has been "not great" for Jada Randle. "It's boring. You just have to sit away from people," said the 10-year-old.

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The star Spica appears high in the southwest about 45 minutes after sunset at this time, which means we’re drawing close to the halfway point in the summer season.

The halfway point in summer is the cross quarter day known as Lammas, for loaf mass, which indicates that this mid-season is all about bread and the wheat harvest. Traditionally at loaf mass, the season’s first wheat would be ground into flour then baked into bread and offered at the sacred site as a blessing for the remaining harvest. Later, the farmer’s wife would be tossed in a blanket with the last sheaf, to bring good luck in the subsequent threshing.

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Seventy years ago, Army Corporal Francis J. Rochon was reported missing in action while fighting in the Korean War. His remains were finally identified last month. Over the weekend, he was buried near his boyhood home in Foxboro, Wis.

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