Stateside: Whitmer on road funding; UM-MSU basketball; is business-friendly good for workers?

Mar 11, 2019

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer breaks down the rationale behind her proposed 45-cent gas tax in her first state budget. Plus, the Univeristy of Detroit Mercy School of Law is celebrating the anniversary of a Detroit meeting between two prominent abolitionists 160 years ago this week. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Whitmer says she’s all ears, but hasn’t heard better ideas from GOP on road funding

  • Last Tuesday, Governor Gretchen Whitmer presented her first budget proposal to the Republican-controlled legislature. That budget included a 45-cent fuel tax to help fund road repair in the state, a strategy that was met with mixed reactions.
  • The governor joined Stateside to talk about her budget, and why she thinks that the proposed gas tax is the most efficient way to raise the money necessary to fix Michigan's roads.  

Can "business friendly" policies be good for workers too?

  • How can Michigan encourage business growth while also supporting its workforce? Stateside spoke to people from two Michigan-based think tanks on either side of the political aisle to get their answer. 
  • Vincent Vernuccio is a senior fellow at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, and Lou Glazer is the president of Michigan Future. They break down their own definitions of the term "business-friendly" and what it means for businesses and Michigan’s workforce.

Bacon: We are witnessing the “golden era” of UM-MSU men’s basketball rivalry

  • On Saturday’s regular season finale between the Wolverines and the Spartans, Michigan State earned the Big Ten title. Michigan Radio’s sports commentator John U. Bacon shares his thoughts on the longtime rivalry between the two teams, and looks ahead to what fans should expect from the NCAA tournament seeds when they are announced next Sunday.

160 years ago in Detroit, John Brown tried to sell Frederick Douglass on his anti-slavery vision

  • Frederick Douglass and John Brown — two towering figures in the abolition movement — met in Detroit 160 years ago this week. They were there to discuss their strategies for ending slavery. The University of Detroit Mercy School of Law is marking that historic anniversary with a symposium titled “Detroit’s Abolitionist Movement: 160 Years of Fighting for Justice.”
  • Nick Schroeck is director of clinical programs at the Mercy School of Law, and Detroit-based author Ken Coleman is with the Michigan Advance. They explain what brought the two activists to Detroit on that historic day, and what the abolition movement in the city looked like at the time.

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