Points North, Ep. 35: Cherry farmers shut down as imports flood in from other countries

Oct 25, 2019

This week on Points North, northern Michigan’s signature cherry industry is struggling amid trade tensions and a lack of federal support.

Plus, learn about a 10-acre corn maze in Traverse City. 

 

Cherry industry could be a casualty of international trade war

Farmer Jim Bardenhagen was forced to remove the tart cherry trees from his orchard in Suttons Bay this fall. He can't afford to maintain them while the price of cherries are so low.
Credit Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

In the midst of tension between the U.S. and global trade partners like Turkey, northern Michigan’s iconic cherry industry is stuck in the middle.

Tart cherry farmers have been undercut by foreign competitors for years and thought tariffs implemented by the Trump administration would help. 

Many say they haven’t.

 

Read the full story here. 

126-year-old Traverse City farm hosts corn maze
Jacob's Corn Maze features outer space this year.
Credit Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

If there’s one essential experience of fall in northern Michigan it’s getting lost in a corn maze. 

Jacob’s Maze is a 10 acre corn maze in Traverse City. IPR’s Taylor Wizner visited the site.

 

Read the full story here.

 

 

 

Micah Sullivan, of Traverse City, asks: 'Do you believe in ghosts?'
Micah Sullivan stands in the center with her family.
Credit Courtesy of Micah Sullivan

Micah Sullivan is a mom of  three children and one step-kid. She recently took a class from IPR Executive Director Peter Payette on how to produce audio stories.

She decided to focus her reporting on asking area residents if they believe in ghosts, and we wondered if she does. 

“I don’t know. I’ve never seen one, but I believe in spirits and energy,” Sullivan says.

She’s had interesting things happen since her brother Mark (Hill) Sullivan died of a stroke suddenly this summer.

“I had a lot of weird experiences after my brother died. I’ve had very intense light things (happen),” she says. “Right after (he) died, I was telling my sister about the lights going on and off at our house.”

She spoke with a few people about their experience.