Arts & Culture

National Writers Series: An evening with David Grann

Sep 28, 2018
Halle Meyers

David Grann is a New Yorker magazine staff writer and author of The Lost City of Z. His new book is called Killers of the Flower Moon. David talks this hour with editor and publisher Lucas Wittmann. 

 

National Writers Series: An evening with Eileen McNamara

Sep 28, 2018
Tom Haxby

Eunice Kennedy Shriver was the sister of President John F. Kennedy, and Senators Robert F. Kennedy and Ted Kennedy. Pulizer Prize-winning journalist Eileen McNamara worked at the Boston Globe for 30 years as a reporter and columnist. Her latest book is called “Eunice: The Kennedy Who Changed the World.” Eileen talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio reporter Morgan Springer. Morgan asked Eileen why she gets angry when people lump all the Kennedy sisters together. 

National Writers Series: An evening with Drew Philp

Sep 27, 2018
Tom Haxby

At age 23, Drew Philp moved to Detroit and bought a house for $500. He spent the next few years renovating it, living without heat or electricity. Drew wrote a book about his experience, called “A $500 House in Detroit: Rebuilding an Abandoned Home and an American City.” He talks this hour with WTCM NewsTalk 580 radio host Ron Jolly. Ron asked Drew where he grew up. 

 

Sebastian Junger is an author and documentary filmmaker. His book “The Perfect Storm” was made into a Hollywood movie. Sebastian’s latest book is “Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging.” Sebastian Junger is joined by journalist Philip Caputo, who wrote the Vietnam memoir “A Rumor of War.” Philip and Sebastian talk with retired U.S. diplomat and political advisor Jack Segal. Jack asked Philip to start the discussion by reading from “A Rumor of War.” 

Aaron Selbig

National Writers Series: An evening with Anna Quindlen

Sep 21, 2018
Tom Haxby

Anna Quindlen is a New York Times columnist and a prolific author of novels and nonfiction books. Her book “One True Thing” was made into a movie starring Meryl Streep. Quindlen’s latest novel is “Alternate Side,” about a New York City family whose idyllic life is shaken by a violent act on their quiet cul-de-sac. She talks this hour with Cynthia Canty, host of the Michigan Radio program Stateside. Cynthia asked what Anna wanted to be before she decided to become a writer. 

 

National Writers Series: An evening with Mary Roach

Sep 21, 2018
Halle Meyers

Mary Roach writes books about science that have a sense of humor. She’s written eight books, including “Stiff,” about human cadavers, and “Bonk,” about the science of sex. Roach’s latest book is “Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” She talks this hour with actor and author Benjamin Busch. He asked Roach about her beginnings as an author, writing press releases for the San Francisco Zoo from a trailer next to the gorilla exhibit. 

 

National Writers Series: An evening with Beth Macy

Sep 20, 2018
Alan Newton

In one of Beth Macy’s previous books, Factory Man, she profiled a furniture maker in rural Virginia struggling to stay in business in an era of rising competition from Asia. In her latest book Dopesick, she returns to central Appalachia to explore the result of economic distress in these small towns: increasing drug addiction and overdose deaths, especially to OxyContin and heroin. Beth talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio executive director Peter Payette.

National Writers Series: An evening with Richard Russo

Sep 14, 2018

Author Richard Russo’s novels include “Nobody’s Fool” and “Empire Falls.” His latest book is a collection of personal essays called “The Destiny Thief.” Richard talks this hour with actor and author Benjamin Busch. Benjamin asked Richard to explain how writers look at the world and translate it to the page.

 

National Writers Series: An evening with Jodi Picoult

Sep 14, 2018

Jodi Picoult has written ten New York Times number one bestsellers, including 2016’s “Small Great Things.” Her latest book is “A Spark of Light.” Jodi talks this hour with Detroit News columnist Neal Rubin, who asked her when she knew that writing would work out as a career. This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in October 2016.

 

National Writers Series: An evening with Doug Stanton

Sep 14, 2018

National Writers Series co-founder Doug Stanton’s latest book is “The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1968 Tet Offensive and the Epic Battle to Survive the Vietnam War.” He talks this hour with author and editor Colin Harrison, who edited Doug’s last two books. Colin asked Doug when he knew “The Odyssey of Echo Company” would become the next story he would tell. This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in September 2017.

 

National Writers Series: An evening with David Maraniss

Sep 14, 2018

David Maraniss was born in Detroit and is now an associate editor at the Washington Post. He’s written biographies of Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, Vince Lombardi, and others. His newest book, “Once in a Great City,” traces the heyday of Detroit and its decline. He talks this hour with fellow journalist John U. Bacon. David starts out explaining more about how he decided to write “Once in a Great City.” This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in October 2016.

 

National Writers Series: An evening with Margaret Atwood

Sep 14, 2018

Margaret Atwood has written over 40 books spanning many genres, including poetry, essays, and fiction. Her latest books include “Hag-Seed,” which is a retelling of Shakespeare’s play “The Tempest,” and “Angel Catbird,” a graphic novel featuring a cat-bird superhero. Margaret starts off telling author and  National Writers Series co-founder Doug Stanton more about how she came to write “Angel Catbird.” This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in October 2016.

 

National Writers Series: An evening with Adriana Trigiani

Sep 13, 2018

Adriana Trigiani’s novels include The Shoemaker’s Wife and Big Stone Gap, which was made into a movie. Her latest novel is Kiss Carlo. Many of her books draw inspiration from her own family’s history and her Italian-American heritage. Adriana talks this hour with author and actor Benjamin Busch. She started the discussion by telling Ben about her family.

National Writers Series: An evening with Daniel Bergner

Sep 7, 2018

Daniel Bergner is the author of five books, including "In the Land of Magic Soldiers" and his latest, "Sing For Your Life," about African-American opera singer Ryan Speedo Green. He's also a journalist who writes for the New York Times Magazine and other publications. Bergner talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio music host and producer Kate Botello. She asked Bergner how he first heard about Ryan Speedo Green.

Traverse City musician Jonathan Timm moved back to the area from Nashville recently. The 34-year-old northern Michigan native says he was missing out on too much at home. 

David Cassleman

Robin Lee Berry is a singer-songwriter and a mainstay in northern Michigan’s folk music scene. She came Up North in the 80s as a single mom.

Aaron Selbig

Morgan Arrowood has been belting out songs and banging away on keyboards since she was four years old. She says even back then - when her parents first signed her up for piano lessons - her style was bold, brash and loud.

Megan Abbott has been writing crime fiction for more than a decade. With two major TV adaptations in the works, many in the industry are calling Abbott Hollywood’s next big novelist. Abbott grew up in the Detroit area before graduating from the University of Michigan and heading to New York University for her Ph.D in English and American Literature.

 

For more than 40 years, Mustard's Retreat has been carrying the banner of folk music. The group's newest album Make Your Own Luck is out now. 

Like something out of a gangster movie, radio personality Jerry Buckley was gunned down in the La Salle Hotel in Detroit 88 years ago this week.

Buckley’s killer was never found, and the mystery of his death involves mobsters, a city mired in violence, and a corrupt mayor who was recalled, in part, because Buckley protested his election on the radio.

Detroit's music scene will welcome the sixth annual Mo Pop Festival at the end of the month.

Our guide to Detroit music, as always, is Paul Young, the founder and publisher of Detroit Music Magazine. He joined Stateside to highlight three local acts that will take the stage at Mo Pop.

Sorry to Bother You is billed as a sci-fi comedy, and is playing in theaters nationwide after debuting at Sundance Film Festival.

It's about the story of a young black telemarketer from Oakland, California named Cassius Green, played by Lakeith Stanfield. An older co-worker, played by Danny Glover, offers advice that helps Cassius climb the ladder to telemarketing success by using his "white voice."

One of the very best ways to enjoy summer in Michigan is to park yourself under a tree or on a beach and get lost in a good book.

Poet Keith Taylor joined Stateside to talk about some of his suggestions for your summer reading list.

Recently retired as a creative writing teacher at the University of Michigan, Taylor just published another book called Ecstatic Destinations about his Ann Arbor neighborhood.

There's something about the a crackling campfire and the looming mystery of a nighttime forest that creates the perfect atmosphere for telling a special kind of story.

Some campfire stories aim to send a shiver down your spine. Others seek to remember a past moment in history or teach a good life lesson.

With that tradition in mind, Stateside will be bringing you a series of stories this summer perfect for your next bonfire. 

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