michigan legislature

Legislation that would eliminate the straight-ticket voting option on Michigan ballots is headed to Gov. Rick Snyder’s desk.

Rick Pluta, co-host of It’s Just Politics and the Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, tells us that if signed, this legislation would have three effects:

It's no secret that voters here in Michigan and across the country are angry and cynical about the notorious gridlock in Washington that has brought the country to its knees with budget showdowns.

It doesn't help that Michigan lawmakers have returned to their summer vacations without a deal to repair our decaying roads.

But as Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes points out, the state House found time to devote to a sex scandal.

It’s hard to argue against the fact that informed citizens are the cornerstone of democracy.

That’s the idea behind the Open Meetings Act: keeping the business of public entities open, transparent, and accessible to the public.

There are some 37,000 names listed in the Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry.

According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Michigan has the fourth-highest per-capita number of people on its list.

But there are questions about Michigan's registry – whether it's really keeping us as safe as we like to think.

People with misdemeanor offenses are listed alongside rapists, pedophiles, and hard-core offenders.

A federal judge recently declared parts of Michigan's registry law to be too vague, even unconstitutional.

J.J. Prescott is a law professor at the University of Michigan. And he's a widely recognized authority on sex offender laws.

Prescott says the state's attempt to monitor these sex offenders may actually contribute to recidivism, as those on the public list are ostracized from society. 

"It's public shaming to the point where somebody might actually say, what's the difference? I'm living as a pariah, miserably, outside of prison," says Prescott.

All through this current session of the state Legislature, Detroit Free Press Lansing reporter Kathy Gray has been tracking the bills that cleared the House and Senate and then were signed into law by Gov. Rick Snyder.

This legislative session 700 bills and 125 resolutions have already been introduced, according to Gray. So far Snyder has signed 16 of those.

Gray says last legislative session close to 1,500 bills were introduced and 40% ended up becoming law.

Jeff Salisbury asked us this question as part of our MI Curious news experiment. It's where you ask a question, questions are put to a vote, and we investigate the question with the most votes. 

Michigan lawmakers are back this week, after a two-week break. And Governor Snyder is pushing hard for a deal to boost road funding as the Legislature's "lame duck" session winds down. 

Gov. Snyder took his case on the road today, with stops in southeast Michigan to highlight the need for better roads.

One bill would effectively double the state’s gasoline tax to raise up to $1.5 billion a year for roads.

Pages