Latest Northern Michigan News

Interlochen Public Radio connects you to the stories, people and places of northern Michigan.

National Writers Series: An evening with Peter Heller

Apr 19, 2020

Peter Heller is a writer of literary nonfiction and novels, including his bestseller “The Dog Stars.”  His latest novel, “The River,” is a thriller that draws from some of Peter’s own experiences canoeing wild rivers. Peter Heller talks this hour with fellow author Peter Robertson. 

Cheryl Bartz

On the guide today: how eastern chipmunks use social distancing, the danger of overharvesting ramps and the sonic power of ruffed grouse.

The video we mention, produced by the Ruffed Grouse Society, is here.

Thanks to Cheryl Bartz, Larry Mawby and Leslie Hamp for production help.

Sarah Allis works at Leland Mercantile in Leland. Essential businesses like grocery stores are now required to screen their employees for symptoms of COVID-19 and take proper social distancing measures.
Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

County health departments are asking businesses that remain open to step up their efforts to prevent transmission of the coronavirus.

Leslie Hamp

On the audio guide today: the first butterflies of spring, nesting bald eagles and oak wilt.

Also, a good reason to put off raking up all that leafy debris in your yards. 

You can report sightings of turtles and other reptiles and amphibians to the Michigan Herp Atlas.


Connor Desilets / Interlochen Public Radio

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, millions of people across the state are working remotely from home — or not at all. But on April 7 the State House of Representatives will go back to work in Lansing.

Michigan House of Representatives

The state house majority leader wants the Governor to let some Michigan businesses get back to work. State Rep. Triston Cole (R-Mancelona) said so in a letter to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer late Monday.

Transmission electron microscopic image of an isolate from the first U.S. case of COVID-19, formerly known as 2019-nCoV. The spherical viral particles, colorized blue, contain cross-sections through the viral genome, seen as black dots.
Hannah A Bullock; Azaibi Tamin / CDC

As coronavirus continues to spread in Michigan, the pandemic puts the state's blood supply at risk.


Tell us your pandemic stories

Mar 24, 2020
Gretchen Carr

 

The pandemic is affecting not only our health as individuals and communities, but our livelihoods, economy and political system in many ways.

During this time, Interlochen Public Radio wants to know how the crisis is affecting your life in northern Michigan. What are you doing in response? What's the hardest part? How do you pass the time? What about your neighbors?

Ty Schmidt got the idea and let us know something he is thankful for in this madness.


Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Michigan rises nearly every day. As the pandemic worsens, putting food on the table is getting harder for some people in rural communities.

Now school districts are rushing to feed students that relied on school lunches, and food pantries in northern Michigan are trying to feed the rest.

Conner Desilets / Interlochen Public Radio

In a brief filed Tuesday, federal prosecutors say they have new evidence for a possible retrial of State Rep. Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg). At his original trial last year, Inman was found not guilty of lying to the F.B.I., but the jury couldn't reach a verdict on two other corruption charges.

Hofbrau Food & Spirits in Interlochen put out a sign letting patrons know they can still order takeout in light of Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's executive order that closes sit-down service at bars and restaurants across the state.
Peter Payette / Interlochen Public Radio

As Michigan’s dine-in restaurants grapple with Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s executive order to stop sit-in service, some are switching to takeout and delivery. 

This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
CDC/ Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS

Sunday night, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, confirmed there are now 53 cases of COVID-19 in Michigan

No cases have been reported in northern Michigan yet, but health officials say it's just a matter of time before the coronavirus hits northern Michigan.

Is northern Michigan prepared?

Max Johnston

Voters across the state went to the polls Tuesday for the Michigan Primary. Overall voting in Grand Traverse County seemed to go smoothly as there weren’t any lines at several polling places or the city clerk’s office. 

“That was pretty simple, we didn't even have a line today," Traverse City voter Sunny Miller said. "I don't know if that's a good thing or a bad thing."

Kaye LaFond

This week on Points North, democrats worry the controversial Line 5 pipeline is dividing labor,  environmental and tribal groups ahead of the Michigan primary.

Plus, hear how environmental policies could impact the presidential race in Michigan. 


Aaron Selbig

Grand Traverse County has joined a growing list of Michigan counties declaring support for the second amendment with a resolution passed by county officials.

Islam Elsedoudi for opensource.com / Flickr

 

In a January Gallup poll, voters ranked health care the top issue for the upcoming U.S. presidential election.

As Michigan votes in its presidential primaries next Tuesday, March 10, northern Michigan health care workers say local health care challenges are similar all over the country.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer was in Traverse City Friday to support Democratic State House candidate Dan O'Neil. She spoke to donors at a fundraiser at the Park Place Hotel. 

National Writers Series: An evening with Steve Luxenberg

Feb 27, 2020
Alan Newton

Steve Luxenberg is a journalist, editor, and author. He last visited Traverse City in 2014 when he spoke on the stage of the City Opera House about his book “Annie’s Ghosts.” Steve’s latest book is “Separate: The Story of Plessy Versus Ferguson, and America’s Journey from Slavery to Segregation.” It tells the story of the landmark 1896 Supreme Court case that shaped the nation’s “separate but equal” race policies for over half a century. Steve talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio Morning Edition host Dan Wanschura. Dan asked Steve how long it took to write his latest book.

Alan Newton

Nicholas Kristof and Cheryl WuDunn are both Pulitzer Prize winning journalists. They’re also a married couple who have written several books together, including “Half the Sky” and “A Path Appears.” Their latest book is “Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope.” It focuses on the decline of the American working class, from the perspective of Nicholas’s childhood hometown, Yamhill, Oregon. Nicholas and Cheryl talk this hour with Nate Payne, editor for the Traverse City Record-Eagle. Nate asked Cheryl how she and Nicholas balance their writing and married life.

DAVID CASSLEMAN / IPR archive

Traverse City Attorney Dan O’Neil announced his bid for Michigan’s 104th State House District, which represents Grand Traverse County.

Courtesy

In September 1999, Kenneth Stearns was riding his motorcycle through Meriden, Kansas, when a truck pulled out in front of him.  

“All I remember on the accident is the truck when he pulled out in front of me, and I had to brake and turn, and as soon as I braked, I lost everything," he says. "I don’t remember anything after that.”

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan’s tart cherry industry is dying out to the tune of $5 million dollars of lost impact to the state since 2010, according to a Michigan State University study.

After another trade loss in January, cherry farmers are considering desperate measures.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Nick Nissley took over as the 11th President of Northwestern Michigan College in Traverse City on Jan. 1. 

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

 

Each year thousands of people enter a lottery to hunt elk in northern Michigan, but only 200 people win tags.

To ensure success, most hunters hire a guide. Increasingly, elk guides are breaking hunting laws, so hunters are guaranteed a shot. Some guides are now worried the rule breakers are damaging the sport’s reputation.

At the elk park in Gaylord, guide Preston Casselman watches elk chew cud and relax.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

The group behind the recall effort to remove Rep. Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg) from office got some breathing room Tuesday.

Pages