U.S. Congress

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Judges say Michigan’s 1st Congressional District was gerrymandered and needs to be redrawn. It was part of a federal court ruling announced Thursday.

Michigan's 1st Congressional District streches over most of northern Michigan and the entire Upper Peninsula. In their decision, the judges said the district was drawn to benefit Republican candidates.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Michael Cohen, President Trump's former lawyer, is testifying on Capitol Hill. Cohen has been sentenced to three years in prison. His sentence begins in May. Cohen pleaded guilty last year to charges of campaign finance violations and other charges related to his work for Trump.

Michigan's congressman Jack Bergman announced he will donate his salary during the federal government's partial shutdown.
Jack Bergman

Congressman Jack Bergman is donating his salary during the Federal Government’s partial shutdown.

In a statement yesterday, Bergman announced he’s giving his pay to local charities in Michigan’s First Congressional District.

David Cassleman

The Soo is one step closer to getting a new lock. The Senate authorized nearly $922.4 million in funding for the project Wednesday.

Matt Morgan (D-Traverse City) is running for northern Michigan's seat in Congress.
Aaron Selbig

A Traverse City Democrat is confident he’ll appear on the November ballot for northern Michigan’s seat in U.S. Congress. 

Matt Morgan failed to get on the primary ballot for the 1st Congressional District because of an error on the forms he used to gather signatures. Most of the forms listed the campaign’s post office box instead of a street address. State election officials decided to keep Morgan’s name off the primary ballot.

Matt Mikus

Northern Michigan Rep. Jack Bergman took questions in Petoskey over the weekend. Bergman spoke at North Central Michigan College on Saturday.

He was asked about natural resources, immigration and health care reform.

Bergman said he wants to find solutions to improve health care but the problem is challenging, especially in rural areas.

Aaron Selbig

Public health officials in northern Michigan say they’re “troubled” by the Republican health care plan.

Congressional Republicans are debating the American Health Care Act, which would replace the Affordable Care Act – or Obamacare.

The Northern Michigan Public Health Alliance, a coalition of health departments in 25 northern counties, released a statement Tuesday saying the Act will drive up the number of uninsured people, and will jeopardize programs like immunizations.

Protesters call on Bergman to hold town hall meetings

Feb 23, 2017
Matt Mikus

Protesters gathered in Petoskey Thursday as Congressman Jack Bergman arrived for a speech.

Sarah Razak - Flickr

The charge has been leveled that state and federal officials put salvaging their careers ahead of making sure kids in Flint had safe drinking water.

I guess being a government agency means never having to say you’re sorry,” said Virginia Tech researcher Mark Edwards, who helped sound the alarm on the lead contamination crisis.

There were tense and angry moments at a congressional hearing on the water crisis in Flint.

The U.S. House Oversight and Government Reform Committee convened for the first of two hearings on the Flint water crisis today. Former Mayor Dayne Walling and former emergency manager Darnell Earley, who were in their positions when the tainted water crisis began, were scheduled to appear at the hearing. Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with Rick Pluta of the Michigan Public Radio Network about what was learned at the hearing.

Friends, family remember 'problem-solver' Robert Griffin

Apr 21, 2015
Aaron Selbig

Former U.S. Senator Robert Griffin passed away Friday in Traverse City. He was 91. Griffin served Michigan for 17 years in the House of Representatives and the U.S Senate. He was also a justice on the Michigan Supreme Court.

His funeral was held Tuesday afternoon in Traverse City. IPR’s Aaron Selbig attended the funeral and spoke with Linda Stephan about the man behind the public face.

The 114th Congress gets to work tomorrow. It’s a Congress that will be led by Republicans in both the House and Senate for the first time in 8 years.

Todd Spangler of the Detroit Free Press breaks down what we can expect.

Listen to our conversation with Spangler below.

Congressman Conyers Will Be On Ballot

May 30, 2014

Congressman John Conyers, D-Detroit, will be on the August primary ballot in Wayne County. State officials said Friday they will not appeal a ruling that ordered his name on the ballot last week.

It looked like Michigan’s second-longest serving member of Congress might not make the ballot after hundreds of Conyers’ signatures were thrown out by local and state election officials. Those signatures were collected by people who were not properly registered to vote.

This post was updated at 4:40 p.m. ET.

A federal judge in Detroit has ruled that Democratic Rep. John Conyers, the second-most-senior member of the U.S. House, will appear on the August primary ballot, overturning a decision by Michigan's secretary of state who said the candidacy was invalid.

Judge Matthew Leitman issued an injunction ordering Conyers' name to be placed on the ballot, The Associated Press says.

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Rep. John Conyers of Detroit, who's served in the U.S. House for nearly five decades, has failed to collect enough valid signatures to appear on the Aug. 5 Democratic primary ballot, a local election official says.

Quinn Klinefelter of member station WDET reports:

"Wayne County Clerk Cathy Garrett found that some campaign workers who gathered petition signatures to place Conyers on the primary ballot were not registered voters.

Congressman Gary Peters has filed petition signatures to put his name on the ballot. Peters is a Democrat running to succeed retiring US Senator Carl Levin. Peters’ support for the federal healthcare law has been an issue in the campaign. Peters says that’s OK with him.

Today we spoke with Michigan Radio’s political analyst, Jack Lessenberry, about the upcoming elections.

We are a little more than four months away from the statewide primaries, the statewide Republican and Democratic conventions, and some seven months away from the general election in November. Among many local and Congressional races, that's also when Michiganders will go to the polls to vote for Governor, Attorney General and Secretary of State. 

Michigan Congressman Dave Camp has announced he will not seek reelection this year. Camp joins a string of Michigan congressional veterans who’ve said they plan to sit out this year’s election.

Camp’s office sent out this statement:

“Today, I am announcing that I will not seek re-election to the United States House of Representatives.  This decision was reached after much consideration and discussion with my family.

Michigan Democratic Rep. John Dingell, who was first elected to Congress in 1955 to fill a seat his father had held, says he will not seek re-election later this year.

He'll leave office having served in Congress longer than anyone else in history. Last June, Dingell passed the previous record holder, the late Sen. Robert Byrd, D-W.Va.

Peter Payette

A plan to designate large portions of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore as wilderness could move forward today in Congress. It’s been five years since the plan was first proposed. It would designate 32,000 acres, more than 40 percent, of Sleeping Bear as wilderness.

Deputy Superintendent Tom Ulrich says that wouldn’t change much in the daily operation of the park, since those areas are already treated as wilderness. It would put the land off limits to future development.