theatre

Bill Church, theatre director at Interlochen Art Academy, performs a section of 'A Christmas Carol' at Interlochen Public Radio.
Dan Wanschura

The Traverse Symphony Orchestra performs its “Home for the Holidays” concert this weekend.

Bill Church, theatre director at Interlochen Arts Academy, will give a dramatic reading of a section from “A Christmas Carol.” 

 

 

The Detroit Public Theatre is wrapping up its third season with a new play that it commissioned: "Birthday Candles." It's written by Noah Haidle, a Grand Rapids native. 

25 years ago this month, a recent college graduate named Christopher McCandless hitchhiked to Alaska. He then hiked into the wilderness, using an old mountain road called the Stampede Trail.

A few months later, on Sept. 6, a hunter found him dead inside an old bus.

Writer Jon Krakauer told this puzzling story in his book Into the Wild which was later adapted into a 2007 film directed by Sean Penn and starring Emile Hirsch.

Now, the story of the young man who called himself "Alexander Supertramp" has been turned into a stage musical.

Into The Wild opens tomorrow night (Friday, April 14) at the Encore Musical Theatre Company in Dexter.

 


As Timothy Douglas gave his cast some advice before a recent rehearsal, giggles broke out when he mimicked one of the characters. Douglas laughed along with the University of Michigan student actors, who were taking notes from their seats in the campus’s Arthur Miller Theatre.

The Tony-award winning musical Fun Home opens tonight at Detroit's Fisher Theatre for a two-week run. Fun Home was adapted from Alison Bechdel's graphic novel, telling the story of her relationship with her gay dad and coming to terms with her own identity as a lesbian.

The musical got a very warm welcome when it finally got to Broadway. It was nominated for 12 Tony Awards and the show won five of them.

A few of those Tonys went to Michigan native Lisa Kron. She grew up in Lansing and is a playwright, actor and co-founder of the theater group Five Lesbian Brothers.

Can the northwest lower peninsula of Michigan support a professional theater group that dares to really challenge its audience? Delivering theater "for the adventurous mind," not comfortable, touristy and familiar?

Turns out, the answer is yes.

Bill Church and Laura Mittelstaedt in a recent rehearsal of 'The Guys.' The play tells the story of an NYC fire captain struggling to write eulogies for the men he lost in the attacks of 9/11.
Dan Wanschura

Bill Church has used a scene from the play The Guys in his acting technique class at Interlochen Arts Academy for years.

The Guys is the story of a fire captain who lost hundreds of men in the attacks on the World Trade Towers on Sept. 11, 2001.

 



A Grand Rapids theater company is on a mission: to produce plays that are written by local playwrights and designed to shine a bright light on social issues.

ADAPT. Theatre Company does just that with their new production, LINES: the lived experience of race 2016.

Six actors play 64 members of the Grand Rapids community. They speak of racial issues that affect people in West Michigan, from gentrification to white privilege, education, religion and justice.

Aaron Selbig

A group of Interlochen students is reviving the radio drama. Their production is called “Until We Can All Sit Down.” It recalls the lunch counter sit-in movement of the early 1960s.

But their radio drama also ties history into the present, relating the Civil Rights Movement with what’s happening today in Baltimore and Ferguson, Missouri.

The radio play has a little bit of everything. There’s singing. There’s a viola and a flute. And of course, lots of sound effects.