theater

Today on Stateside, we hear how health systems, armed with what they now know about COVID-19, are planning for the treatment of future cases. Also, a look at how Michigan’s theaters are staying connected to audiences that can’t come to shows. Plus, college seniors fill us in on what it’s like to graduate—and enter the job market—during a pandemic.

Today on Stateside, it’s been four years since the state announced a criminal investigation into the Flint water crisis. We talked to two journalists who covered the crisis about lessons learned on government accountability and public health. Plus, the state of Michigan files suit against some of the biggest names in corporate America over PFAS contamination. We'll hear about how a similar case played out in Minnesota. 

Changes are coming to The Bay Theatre in Suttons Bay. The Bahle family has decided to stop managing the theater at the end of this year.

Theater Manager Erik Bahle says they’re tapped out physically, financially and emotionally.

He says he hopes the community will take over management and eventually ownership, and there is already energy and enthusiasm around this.

"This really is the start of its life," says Bahle. "This isn't the end of anything."

“When I first go on stage I’m nervous, but as I go I feel exhilarated. I feel like I am the only one out there and that’s amazing.”

 

 

The Detroit Public Theatre is wrapping up its third season with a new play that it commissioned: "Birthday Candles." It's written by Noah Haidle, a Grand Rapids native. 

 

 

This time, David Kiley of Encore Michigan brings us an eclectic mix of shows from theaters across Michigan.

 

Listen above to hear Kiley’s previews of the following shows:

Theater happenings around Michigan this week range from a sequel to the Phantom of the Opera to a show about systemic racism.

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside to talk about those shows and more.

What’s lighting up stages in Michigan this month?

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside today to give his take on productions from professional theater companies around the state.

It's time again to explore what's on stages across Michigan on Stateside's monthly Theater Talk segment.

David Kiley from Encore Michigan joined the show today to break down what's up in lights around the state right now.

Summer is a time for crowd pleasers in the theater world.

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside for another round of Theater Talk, highlighting the newest summer shows.

In another edition of Theater Talk on StatesideDavid Kiley of Encore Michigan joined the show to discuss what's happening in the community this summer with professional theater productions.

He began by discussing the Michigan Shakespeare Festival. This year, the festival is offering Julius Caesar, among others.

School is letting out, and it's time to plan your Michigan summer getaways. No matter where in the state your vacation takes you, there’s probably a theater production not too far away.

As part of our ongoing series Theater Talk, David Kiley of Encore Michigan detailed upcoming shows at Thunder Bay Theater, Barn Theater, Mason Street Warehouse Theater, as well as this year’s Broadway shows at the Fisher Theater in Detroit.

For this edition of Theater Talk on Stateside, David Kiley of Encore Michigan joins the show to talk about four productions currently on stage across Michigan. Two are Academy Award-nominated films adapted into musicals (and only one of them is authorized), one is a drama about a single mom's intimate encounter with a U.S. Senator, and another is a Tennessee Williams classic that's making a rare appearance in the state. 

The town of Williamston, in Ingham County, has a population just under four thousand people. Like many Michigan towns of its size, its downtown historic district boasts a variety of retail and dining establishments.

But nestled among the brick storefronts is a somewhat less-familiar sight: an 88-seat black box theater.

Two LARPers, or Live Action Role Players, during a recent get-together in Traverse City.
Lisa Fierstein

Fantasy books, games and movies can take you to another reality. Think about Dungeons and Dragons, or The Lord of the Rings. But what if you could enter those alternate, fantasy worlds in real life?

Some people try through LARPing— or Live Action Role Playing— and it blurs the lines between reality and fantasy.

There’s a LARP group in the Traverse City area. They fight evil, save the king and come out victorious, all within 48 hours. 


From left: Richard (Kyle Carter) Vickie (Macie Goodspeed) Janet (Madi Shank)
Joann Muma

Friday is the opening night of The Manistee Civic Players’ stage rendition of 1970s hit television show Free to Be… You and Me. Kate Botello sat down to talk with the director of the production, Connar Klock. He lives in Kalamazoo, but he’s originally from the Manistee area and was asked to come back to direct this show about gender neutrality and social constructs. Behind the bouncy and upbeat music, Free to Be… You and Me addresses serious themes that are still relevant today. 

 


Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro will be part of the Young Americans focus during the 2016 Interlochen Arts Festival.
Jake Shimabukuro

Huey Lewis and the News, Martina McBride, and Jay Leno are some of the bigger names coming to Interlochen this summer.

The 2016 Interlochen Arts Festival lineup was announced today.

In addition to some of the more widely recognized names, this year's festival also showcases some of America's next generation of artists. Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, who's from Hawaii, will be making an appearance as will Detroit poet Danez Smith.

Dave Dunckel says he played the role of the tough Army guy during his 15-month deployment to Iraq.
Dave Dunckel

Command Sgt. Maj. Dave Dunckel had many different jobs during his 25-year career in the Army. But in the spring of 2006 the Army asked him to do something that changed his life. 

They asked him to notify a family in Eagle, Michigan, that their 19-year-old son had been killed in Iraq. 

“It was horrible,” he says.

As he drove home that night, the 48-year-old Dunckel decided he couldn’t go back to a desk job in the Army. He resigned his position, and volunteered for an individual deployment. 

 


    

You've heard the saying, "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade." Well here's another take on that saying: "When life gives you stage-four lung cancer, open an improv comedy club that's also a brewery."

Tori Tomalia and her husband, Jason, are preparing to do just that: the Pointless Brewery & Theatre is about to open in Ann Arbor nearly two years after she was blindsided by the cancer diagnosis.

"Fearless. Fresh. Made in Detroit.”

That's the motto of the Detroit Public Theatre, whose mission is to produce theater with top writers, directors, and actors in Midtown Detroit's growing cultural district.

Ring the bell, time to go back to school: this week on The Green Room

Sep 3, 2015
Theater director Minda Nyquist getting acquainted with her new office at West High School in Traverse City.
Daniel Wanschura

Ready or not, it’s back to school time!

While students are cherishing their last days of summer, teachers are busily preparing for the upcoming school year.

Minda Nyquist is one of them. She’s getting ready for her new role as the theater director at West High School in Traverse City. She’s taking over for Kristie Bach, who developed the theater program at West into the renown program it is today. Minda hopes to continue to build on what Kristie started 18 years ago.

Small-town movie theaters are in a fight for their lives.

Hollywood studios are phasing out 35-millimeter film in favor of going digital. This means theaters are feeling the pressure to spend thousands of dollars to upgrade their facilities, or be forced to close their doors.

One such theater is The Rialto, about to mark its 100th anniversary in Grayling. 

Jordan Stancil's great-grandfather founded the Rialto Theater in 1915.

The Rialto ran a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter to raise money to upgrade its systems, and Stancil tells us they raised over $100,000 with the support of current and former residents of Grayling.

Out Of The Dark: Lightwire Theater

Feb 21, 2014

Lightwire Theater may be the only theater company in the world that performs on a dark stage. That’s because they use big, wearable puppets made of light. Lightwire Theater performs in Boyne City Friday, February 21st. Ian Carney is one of the co-founders of Lightwire Theater. Ian says the company uses a technology called El wire. 

P45 Theater Tames The Shrew

Nov 12, 2013
P45

Actor David Montee loves Shakespeare. But there's one Shakespeare play that has always bothered him. Montee says "The Taming of the Shrew" depicts Kate as a caricature. That's why he prefers an adaptation of the play by Charles Marowitz. It's called simply "The Shrew." David Montee plays Kate's father Baptista in the show. The P45 theater company is staging it this week.