stateside from michigan radio

Today on Stateside, as a federal corruption probe into the United Auto Workers union focuses on UAW president Gary Jones, some in the union are reportedly questioning his future there. Plus, a doctor warns caution in the new era of legal cannabis.

 

Today on Stateside, what you need to know about the outbreak of a deadly mosquito-borne virus in Michigan. Plus, the growing number of cities in Michigan designating themselves "promise zones" and offering tuition assistance to their high school graduates.  

 

Today on Stateside, a Detroit-based company tries to mediate the “plague” of tax foreclosures in the city of Detroit. Plus, we hear from a judge who might have made a legal path for LGBTQ people to go to court for discrimination even though there are no civil rights protections for them in Michigan.

Today on Stateside, how is Benton Harbor High School faring after months of scrutiny from the Whitmer administration over the school’s low test scores and high debt? Plus, how will negotiations between UAW and the Big Three be impacted by the looming threat of a recession and an ongoing FBI probe into union leadership?

Today on Stateside, it's been three weeks since a Michigan man died after being deported to Iraq. How are things for hundreds of other Chaldeans facing deportation? Plus, how one school district is remodeling its high school to make it harder for a mass shooter to carry out an attack.

Today on Stateside, we hear about a lawsuit, filed by the Michigan Republican Party, that aims to block an independent commission from redrawing legislative maps. Plus, we talk about the tough ethical choices people face when trying to do something about climate change.

Today on Stateside, after resigning from his position as mayor of Ferndale, Democrat Dave Coulter has been sworn in to replace the late L. Brooks Patterson as Oakland County Executive. Plus, how are researchers working to address the problem of annual cyanobacterial blooms on Lake Erie?

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

 


 

Today on Stateside, how Michigan farmers are dealing with devastating crop losses and the impacts of a trade war. Plus, many in Michigan's immigrant communities were not surprised by a new Trump administration rule that denies green cards to immigrants who have used, or are likely to use, public benefits.

 

 

Today on Stateside, Samuel Stanley Jr. officially took his place as Michigan State University's 21st president earlier this month. We talk to Stanley about his goals and plans for his first year in office. Plus, we talk about the ways climate change is already impacting human health in Michigan. 

 


 

Today on Stateside, former Michigander Jimmy Aldaoud was deported to Iraq, a country he had never been to, in June. This week, his family says he died after not being able to obtain insulin for his diabetes. We talk to a family friend about what happened. Plus, the challenges of finding inclusive long-term care facilities when you're an LGBT senior.

 

 


Today on Stateside, a Republican state representative says the way to reduce mass shootings is by strengthening the mental health system, and toning down rhetoric on "all sides." Plus, how nonprofits are picking up the slack in some of Michigan's cash-strapped cities.

Today on Stateside, how should Congress respond in the aftermath of two mass shootings this weekend that left more than 30 people dead in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio? Plus, with the controversy surrounding CTE and other brain damage in professional football players, should parents be worried about their kid's safety in the sport? 

Today on Stateside, dairy farms face an uncertain future in Michigan. We speak to a sixth-generation farmer, a pair of cheesemakers in Northern Michigan, and more about the obstacles farmers face and how they are adapting.

Today on Stateside, the political future of Michigan’s 10th Congressional District after Republican Representative Paul Mitchell announced that he will be retiring in 2020. Plus, a conversation about key events that changed the tides of American politics over the past decade with “American Carnage” author Tim Alberta.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.

 


 

Today on Stateside, Republican state legislators are considering ways to pay for road repairs, including one proposal that would allow counties and cities to levy their own local gas tax. Plus, Jerry Linenger was just 14-years-old when he watched the moon landing on a small black-and-white television screen. That moment would inspire him to pursue a career as an astronaut for NASA, where he manned three missions and traveled some 54 million miles in space. 

 

Today on Stateside, how does the right to free speech apply when it comes to the personal Twitter accounts of elected officials? Plus, we hear about how a nationwide shortage of volunteer firefighters is affecting communities in the state.

 


Today on Stateside, we hear from two men who say they were sexually assaulted after being placed in adult prisons as teenagers. A class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of hundreds of other men with similar claims  is finally going to court after years of state opposition. Plus, if you're sick of robocalls (we sure are), we've got some bad news: They aren't stopping anytime soon. 

Today on Stateside, how new rules from the state are likely to shape the marketplace for recreational marijuana in Michigan. Plus, a new bipartisan proposal in Lansing would overhaul the state’s current emergency manager law. 

Today on Stateside, we remember Lee Iacocca, the legendary auto industry executive who died this week at age 94. Plus, a refresher on the state’s firework safety laws ahead of Independence Day.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Today on Stateside, after just 31 years of use, the Palace of Auburn Hills is being demolished to make way for a mixed-use office park. Plus, an emergency room physician explains why there needs to be more research on how marijuana affects the mind and the body.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

 

Today on Stateside, we talk about rethinking how we measure whether a school is succeeding or failing. Plus, a conversation with Michigan Supreme Court Justice Richard Bernstein about how people with disabilities bring unique, important perspectives to the workplace.

Today on Stateside, Detroit police have identified a person of interest in the murders of three women in the city, cases that officials believe may be connected. Plus, how one research scientist at the Wayne State University School of Nursing approaches end-of-life conversations with teens and young adults.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Today on Stateside, how the state is carrying out infrastructure projects it can't afford to maintain. Plus, an Interlochen Public Radio investigation into the Grand Traverse County Correctional Facility after multiple former female inmates claimed that some officers were ignoring their requests for basic personal hygiene products. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer says that Benton Harbor Area Schools have until June 14 to submit a plan to keep their high school open. If not, the state could choose to dissolve the entire district. Plus, Northern Michigan University is working to provide affordable Internet access to students in need. 

 


 

Today on Stateside, Michigan bean farmers send a lot of exports to Mexico. So, what happens to those farmers if President Trump follows through on his threats to add tariffs to Mexican goods? Plus, we hear about a tricked out bicycle with accordion and percussion instruments that blends classical music and public art. 

Pages