snow

Above average precipitation is expected over the Great Lakes from December through February, according to NOAA.
Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan could see a lot of snow this winter according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which came out with its 2020 U.S. Winter Outlook on Thursday.


Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Winter is on it’s way, and everyone in northern Michigan is getting ready.

Cherry farmers are protecting their crops from the cold, and they need to save as many cherries as they can. 

Plus, learn how you can help meteorologists stay on top of snowfall this winter.

  

Winter weather led to record-breaking ski season

Mar 14, 2019
The view from atop Crystal Mountain
Wikimedia Commons

 

 

Northern Michigan ski resorts say they had one of their best years yet. Many report more people have hit the slopes this year because of heavy snowfall and colder temperatures. 

Crystal Mountain Spokesperson Brian Lawson says the resort saw a 10 percent increase in attendance from last year. He says an especially frigid winter had people coming to the slopes.

"It keeps skiing and snowboarding front of mind," Lawson says. "I think that’s definitely been the case this season."

If you’ve been watching the Winter Olympics in South Korea, there’s a pretty good chance you’ve seen the product of a Michigan company.

The snow on the ski slopes is manufactured snow — fake snow — made by Snow Makers Incorporated based in Midland.

When I moved from Tennessee to Michigan, winter hit me like a ton of bricks, or maybe it was a full body ice cream headache.

Remember how winters used to be really, really cold? One day you’d wake up and there was no doubt – fall was gone. Winter had arrived. Suddenly the wind rushed straight from the arctic and smacked you in the face. Snow piled up around you, and your eyes stung from the cold.

For Throwback Thursday, we're revisiting a story we did last year on the invention of the snurfboard. 

MLive is marking Muskegon Community College's exhibition, 50th Anniversary of the Surfer's Inventionwith a visual timeline of snurfing's contribution to snowboarding.

Listen to our "Made In Michigan" interview with the snurfer's inventor, Sherm Poppen. 

New hires will clear snow from TC sidewalks, trails

Dec 2, 2014

Traverse City will pay three new, seasonal employees $15 per hour to help in its snow removal effort. The new hires will be part of a five-person team that will prioritize 79 miles of city sidewalks and eight miles of the TART Trail. 

The city commission approved the new hires at its meeting last night.

City Commissioner Ross Richardson said it is “high time” the city expanded snow removal from streets to non-motorized pathways.

Those of us who lived through last winter are now familiar with the term "polar vortex." But are we using that phrase correctly? Sara Schultz is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in White Lake. Exactly what IS the polar vortex? And what is it not?

Listen to Sara Schultz above

TC ready to enforce snow removal rules

Oct 14, 2014

Traverse City residents say the city does not do a good job of clearing sidewalks of snow. But city officials want residents to know they are responsible for clearing snow from sidewalks – not the city.

The city is planning an outreach campaign to educate the public about the snow-clearing laws and to write tickets to property owners who don't comply.

If you ask just about anyone in Michigan about the weather this winter, chances are he or she will swear there has never been this much snow.

Well, yes and no. Some cities shattered their snowfall records in January, but in some parts of the state, January snowfall was pretty much business as usual.

Let's see who has legit bragging rights when it comes to snowfall.

MLive meteorologist Mark Torregrossa, who also runs the site farmerweather.com, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

National Weather Service

Ice on northern Lake Michigan is starting to cut off lake effect snow in the region.

The lake is entirely frozen over, north of Beaver Island. That means winds coming out of the northwest will not pick up moisture from the lake and drop it as snow on places like Petoskey and Gaylord.