News

Today on Stateside, how new rules from the state are likely to shape the marketplace for recreational marijuana in Michigan. Plus, a new bipartisan proposal in Lansing would overhaul the state’s current emergency manager law. 

The planet Saturn, the Titan god of the old order, opposes the Sun this week, while standing on the opposite side of the Milky Way from the planet Jupiter, god of the Olympians. But while these two gods have their counterparts in the celestial world, there’s another player in the story who doesn’t appear; he’s the ‘hidden god’, who serves as the bridge between them.

Essay: Lost Scarf

Jul 5, 2019

It wasn’t a fancy scarf, just a strip of red and blue plaid that I wrapped around my neck in the winter.  On really cold days, I pulled the edge up over my nose, enjoying the smell and warmth of wool.


Wikimedia Commons

You’ve likely been seeing fireworks in the sky celebrating Fourth of July early, but because of a new law you might not see them throughout the weekend depending on where you live.

KATE GARDINER / FLICKR - HTTP://BIT.LY/1RFRZRK

Michigan lawmakers visited Illinois on Monday to learn more about the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan to stop Asian Carp from reaching Lake Michigan.

Today on Stateside, we remember Lee Iacocca, the legendary auto industry executive who died this week at age 94. Plus, a refresher on the state’s firework safety laws ahead of Independence Day.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Grand Traverse Sheriff's Office

Green Lake Township currently relies on other deputies from across Grand Traverse County, but now the county will assign an officer to the township.

Interlochen Center for the Arts, Green Lake Township and Grand Traverse County will split the bill. Overall, the officer will cost about $130,000, which includes training and equipment costs.

Vice President of Finance and Operations at ICA Pat Kessel says an officer nearby will make campus safer.

There’s a terrific mystery being staged in the night sky this week and throughout the summer, where the planets Jupiter and Saturn appear on opposite sides of the Milky Way.

The Friends of the Boyne River

Boyne City plans to make it illegal to jump into the river from a stretch of boardwalk and other locations.

Mayor Tom Neidhamer says police noticed large roots and other dangerous material near an area where local kids like to jump 20-30 feet into the water.

"We don't to stop people from having fun," he says. "That's what living in Northern Michigan is all about. But there's a safety issue."

He says swimming and floating on the river will still be allowed.

City commissioners expect to vote on the ordinance at the next meeting on July 9.

 


 

Today on Stateside, a Republican proposal to fix Michigan’s roads is circulating in Lansing that wouldn't raise taxes. Plus a look at avian botulism, a disease that’s killing waterfowl across the Great Lakes.

Morgan Springer

The Traverse Bay Area Intermediate School District has started to replace several members of the Glen Lake School Board.

Four members of the seven-member board resigned on Wednesday, in protest of the departure of the district’s superintendent.

The TBAISD is now looking for applications from people who reside in Glen Lake to finish the remaining terms. Two of the appointments will last for a year, while the others go through 2022.

PFAS are toxic chemicals that don’t really break down, so they can remain in the environment and in people for a long time.
MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY / FLICKR

Over the past few years, Michiganders have become all too familiar with a class of chemicals known as per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS. They’re toxic chemicals that have been found in water and land across the state.


Essay: Holy Places

Jun 28, 2019

It’s almost too warm to jog but I lace up my shoes anyway. There’s no traffic this morning because it’s Sunday and the streets are quiet. The only cars are on their way to church or to the convenience store for coffee and a paper.


Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, the water is so high in Michigan this summer that shorelines are disappearing, docks are underwater and rivers are overflowing. Plus hear how high water is affecting public access to beaches and research on avian botulism. 

 


Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan has complicated laws when it comes to private beaches and public access, and the rules for inland lakes are different from the Great Lakes.

 


Today on Stateside, a public policy and economics professor at Hillsdale College weighs in on the free college tuition proposals that are bound to arise in this week's Democratic debates. Plus, some species of native freshwater mussels are under threat and we look at how their decline could change the Great Lakes.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below.  

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Anti-abortion groups will soon be on sidewalks and at events around the state, asking voters to support ballot measures that would restrict abortion in Michigan.

Today on Stateside, after just 31 years of use, the Palace of Auburn Hills is being demolished to make way for a mixed-use office park. Plus, an emergency room physician explains why there needs to be more research on how marijuana affects the mind and the body.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Zoe Clark / Michigan Radio

The money will be distributed to a variety of areas, including funding for implementing parts of the new Lead and Copper Rule for drinking water.

Today on Stateside, what are living conditions like for undocumented children who are brought to Michigan from migrant detention centers at the southern border? Plus, a conversation with one of the last surviving members of World War Two’s famous Tuskegee Airmen military unit. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Peter Payette / Interlochen Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Agriculture will buy $30 million of tart cherries from domestic farmers this year, according to Rep. Jack Bergman (R-Watersmeet.)

"The tart cherry industry has gone above and beyond to fight adverse circumstances facing their market, including the unfair dumping of cheap imports from Turkey and other foreign countries," Rep. Jack Bergman (R-Watersmeet) said in a press release.

The tart cherries will be used in federal food assistance programs like the National School Lunch Program.

Finding Stars the Way Bo Peep Finds Sheep

Jun 24, 2019

Constellation-hopping is one of the ways you can find your way around the night sky, and this week it can help you to the radiant, or center point of an early summer meteor shower, called the Boötids.

 The Boötids take their name from the constellation Boötes, the herdsman, and even though the falling stars don’t really come from the constellation itself, this kind of naming practice makes for some great storytelling.

Essay: Don't Contradict

Jun 21, 2019

Freedom of speech, while guaranteed in the Constitution, was not encouraged in my home when I was growing up. I could speak my mind only if I agreed with my parents. Otherwise, I was told, “Don’t contradict.” 


Max Johnston

The attorney for State Representative Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg) wants the charges against his client dismissed. Inman has plead not guilty to charges of extortion, soliciting a bribe and lying to the FBI. 

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and U.S. Coast Guard says current high water levels increase the risk of Electric Shock Drowning.
Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

High water levels in the state have the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and U.S. Coast Guard concerned about Electric Shock Drowning.

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