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Today on Stateside, after 31 days on the picket line, the UAW and General Motors came to a tentative contract agreement. We hear about the details and what comes next. Plus, Michigan farmers face record low production of corn and soybeans  after a cold, wet spring. 

Flicker / Vaping360.com

A Michigan Court of Claims judge says the state ban on flavored vaping products must be lifted.

That’s while underlying litigation opposing the ban plays out in court. Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s administration issued emergency rules in September. The Department of Health and Human Services says youth vaping is a public health crisis. 

Some state lawmakers want to swap one holiday for another. Monday was Columbus Day, and a pair of bills would get rid of Columbus Day and make Indigenous Peoples Day a state holiday instead.

Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

In a radio interview with Vic McCarty on WTCM Monday morning, Traverse City Area Public Schools Board President Sue Kelly broke her silence on an alleged fallout with TCAPS Superintendent Ann Cardon.

Kelly dodged direct questions on Cardon or her future with the district.

Stewart McFerran

Yard signs are popping up throughout the village of Arcadia that say: “Save the Arcadia Bells.” The bells of Trinity Lutheran Church ring every hour from 7 in the morning until 10 at night. A request to reduce the noise raised an outcry in the Manistee County community.  

 

Trinity Lutheran Church was built in Arcadia 1888 and the sound of bells has been heard in the Pleasant Valley ever since. They can even be heard by boaters on Lake Michigan too. Locals like Nancy Masterson say the bells help people keep track of time in the village.

Traverse City Area Public Schools

The Traverse City Area Public Schools Board is allegedly at odds with new District Superintendent Ann Cardon, and there is speculation that Cardon may be out of a job soon.

The school board hasn't commented on Cardon's future or the nature of the disagreement, but Board President Sue Kelly put out a joint statement with Cardon Monday.

Each year in this season, the Sun moves through the region of Libra stars, and the constellation of the starry crown sets in the west, settling all the mysteries of destiny for the year.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Ann Cardon still has a job, for now.

She’s the superintendent of Traverse City Public Schools — a job she’s had for a little over two months, after the school board unanimously voted to offer her the position earlier this year.

Traverse City Area Public Schools Board Member Erica Moon Mohr wrote a letter addressing the four board members who are working to oust TCAPS Superintendent Ann Cardon. The letter, posted below, went to TCAPS Board President Sue Kelly, Jane Klegman, Jeffery Leonhardt and Pamela Forton. 

Bills that would raise the age of the juvenile court’s jurisdiction from 17 to 18-years-old are one step closer to the governor’s desk.

Jim Sorbie / Flickr

 

People who have homes on the sandy, eroding shores of Lake Michigan don’t have a lot of protections when it comes to insurance coverage. 

Regular homeowners insurance does not cover flooding or any land movement, including erosion of the land beneath a structure.

Banks that give loans to lakefront homes require flood insurance, which could possibly provide some erosion coverage.

The Association of State Floodplain Managers Alan Lulloff says erosion that happens after a storm could be covered.

Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

The board of Traverse City Area Public Schools could look at removing recently-appointed Superintendent Ann Cardon at a special meeting today, sources tell IPR

Gary Langley, an FAA certified sUAS pilot / Interlochen Public Radio

 

Fishtown officials are looking to move three shanties — historic buildings — from their original location in an effort to repair foundations rotted by high water levels this summer. 

The shanties will be placed roughly 10 to 15 feet back from their current location. They will be encased in weatherproof material to protect the structures from Michigan’s harsh winter weather.

The price tag to move them and replace the foundations is about $1 million, says Amanda Holmes, executive director of Fishtown Preservation. 

Property owners along the Lake Michigan shoreline are worried about the rapid erosion caused by high water levels on the lake.
Gary Langley, FAA certified sUAS pilot / Interlochen Public Radio

As Lake Michigan water levels remain at a near record high, more and more shoreline is being eaten away everyday. Large trees are sliding down steep banks into the water, wooden staircases are being torn out and property owners are panicking. As the fall storm season approaches, some worry their homes will be next.


Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel recently recommended changes to bills on expunging criminal records. The bills are up for debate in the state Legislature.

A half-century ago, within the span of two years, three of America’s rivers caught fire. One of them was in Michigan. Those fires ignited the environmental movement. 

On this date, October 9th, 50 years ago, the Rouge River caught fire. 

Northwestern Michigan College

Northwestern Michigan College announced that its faculty approved a new employment contract.

 

NMC union employees voted almost unaminously today to accept the agreement that was reached after a 10-hour negotiation with a state mediator.

The faculty bargained for salary increases and more organizational flexibility after their contracts expired last December. An external fact finder report found salaries could be higher.

The NMC Board of Trustees will vote on the proposed contract next Monday.

Today on Stateside, as the UAW strike against General Motors begins its fourth week, we hear from one striker on the picket line. Plus, how Governor Whitmer’s line item vetoes will impact charter schools and autism services in Michigan. 

Proposed changes to state statute that would ban Licensed Professional Counselors from diagnosing patients are creating conflict among mental health professionals.

The skies they were ashen and sober; 

the leaves they were crispéd and sere~

the leaves they were withering and sere;

It was night in the lonesome October

Of my most immemorial year…

So wrote Edgar Allen Poe, poet and story writer, two years before he died in October, one hundred and seventy years ago this week.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan will get $2.6 million from drug manufacturer Reckitt Benckiser Group, according to the Michigan Attorney General's office.

Michigan filed suit with 32 other states claiming that the company misled doctors, patients and the public while marketing the drug. 

Today on Stateside, the potential of the cannabis compound CBD as a treatment for people with chronic pain. Plus, a study out of North Carolina State University breaks down why the tax incentives states use to lure businesses might not be paying off.

Airbus

The Trump Administration announced they will put $7.5 billion worth of tariffs on goods flown into the U.S. on flights from Airbus. That will include several tart cherry products from Austria, Germany and Hungary. 

A state lawmaker says she felt “forced” by the Speaker of the House to remove a gun free zone sign from her state House office. Democratic State Rep. Kara Hope (D-Holt) put up the sign last month. She says for the safety and comfort of her staff, she didn’t want any firearms in her office.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

This week on Points North, the Pere Marquette River is internationally-recognized for its brown trout, lake trout and salmon. But locals are worried that a train could soon derail and spill toxic chemicals into the river.

Plus, amidst road budget debates in the State Capitol, hear a Q&A about Michigan's crumbling bridges.

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