museum

Craig Hadley is the new executive director of the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City, Michigan.
Cindy O'Dell

When Eugene Jenneman announced his retirement from the Dennos Museum Center last year, the art museum in Traverse City began a national search for his replacement. Jenneman had been the first and only executive director of the museum since it opened nearly 30 years ago.

After narrowing the search, their top choice was 35 year-old Craig Hadley, who spent the last eight years as curator of the art museum at DePauw University in Indiana.


The Eyaawing Museum was designed around this central exhibit. A pair of mated eagles were doing a bonding ritual where they lock talons and freefall together. Their wing tips hit two powerlines and the pair were electrocuted to death.
Morgan Springer

Two replicas of Christopher Columbus’ ships have drawn protests from Native American groups. The boats – called the Niña and Pinta – are touring the Great Lakes this summer and are now tied up in Grand Traverse Bay at the Clinch Park Marina.

Lundy steps down as History Center director

Apr 1, 2015

The Traverse City History Center is looking for a new executive director, following the resignation of Maddie Lundy. Lundy left last week after serving the center for the last three years. Her departure comes at a time of change for the center, which recently signed a lease to stay in the city-owned Carnegie Library building.

Board Chairman Bruce Wiegand says the center no longer plans to run a museum in the Carnegie building.

The Next Idea

The success of Michigan’s future economy will rely on more of our children engaging with science and technology. Their personal futures will depend on it too.

The Michigan Historical Museum has a new collection of forestry artifacts from the early 1900s. The items belonged to Marcus Schaaf, an early pioneer in the reforestation of northern Michigan. The collection includes field instruments Schaaf used, like an old wooden dial compass and a 66-foot metal surveyor’s tape.

Ken Pott is field historian for the Michigan Department of Resources. IPR’s Aaron Selbig asked Pott about Marcus Schaaf’s place in Michigan history.

History Center moving out of Carnegie building

Oct 16, 2014
Traverse City Convention and Visitors Bureau

The Traverse City History Center is moving out of the building it has called home for the last 13 years. The center’s board voted Tuesday night to terminate its lease on the Traverse City-owned Carnegie building.

The city had offered $10,000 to keep the center going through the end of the year but the board decided it couldn’t wait that long. The center leaves behind the Con Foster collection, which contains more than 10,000 artifacts owned by the city.

History Center acting Executive Director Maddie Buteyn talked to IPR’s Aaron Selbig about the decision.

Michigan boasts a fine array of museums. It seems there's something for everybody: 

  • The Henry Ford in Dearborn
  • The Gerald R Ford Museum in Grand Rapids
  • The Sloan Museum in Flint
  • The Great Lakes Children's Museum in Traverse City

And how about "The Pickle Barrel House Museum" in Grand Marais?

Pat Munger, president of the Grand Marais Historical Society, said the museum was originally built for William Donahey, a cartoonist and author of children’s books from 1914 to 1972.

His cartoons were about people who were about two inches tall and lived in the woods around Grand Marais.

For a promotional campaign for Monarch Food’s Pickles, Donahey drew a tiny family that lived in a pickle. The pickles were put in little pickle barrels.

One of the owners of Monarch Foods, named Mr. Murdock, was friends with Donahey and built him a pickle barrel house as a surprise to Donahey’s wife.

That house now serves as a museum.

*Listen to the full interview with Pat Munger on Stateside at 3:00 pm. Audio for this story will be added by 4:30 pm.