Morning Classical

Welcome to Episode Five of Show Tunes with Kate Botello! This week: the Ghostess with the Mostess, almost-love songs, and a revealing Musical Theatre War Story from our friend Mary Jo West. Tune in to Classical IPR Sunday night at 7pm, or listen any time right here.

Click through to see this week's playlist and find out how to hear your voice on the show!


Welcome to Episode 2 of Show Tunes with Kate Botello!

Click through to see this week's playlist, watch a fabulous dance routine and find out how to hear your voice on the show.


You may know Ana Gasteyer from her six years on Saturday Night Live, or from the movies, Broadway, or the TV show Suburbia. She's performing tonight at 7:30 at Interlochen Center for the Arts, in a show based around her album, I'm Hip.  We asked Ana to pick out a couple of her favorite tracks for the album and tell us more about the music.

To see Ana Gasteyer tonight, visit: tickets.interlochen.org.


Welcome to Episode 1 of Show Tunes with Kate Botello!

Click through to see this week's playlist,  watch a bonus showstopping video, and find info on how to hear your voice on the show!
 


IPR wishes a happy birthday to composer PDQ Bach, the twenty-first of JS Bach's twenty children.

Learn more about the life of PDQ Bach by reading his full biography by Professor Peter Schickele.

Guitarist Bret Hoag (pictured, left) and flutist Jeff Zook (pictured, right) are colleagues and studio neighbors at Oakland University in Detroit. The two started out as mutual admirers, and ended up touring together.

Jeff enjoys finding challenging new arrangements for them to play. Bret enjoys telling Jeff to quit finding pieces written for the piano ("I keep throwing him piano parts," says Jeff, "and he keeps throwing them back."). Somehow, no matter the original instruments, they always come up with something compelling that works for both of them.

Bret and Jeff were in town for an "Around the World," themed concert at the Oliver Art Center, in conjunction with Chamber Music North. They treated us to three pieces Live in Studio A, including a Libby Larsen piece that Jeff performed on a flute d'amore. We discussed its eerie sound, and how the instrument had recently enraptured a group during a performance. "I felt like I just had everyone in the palm of my hand," said Jeff. I told him, "That's why it's called the Flute of Love." He replied, "Exactly, baby!"

Listen to the three pieces, below: the first movement of Piazzolla's Histoire du Tango, the Libby Larsen, and a piece from Enrique Granados originally written for piano, but transcribed for guitar (it seems Bret has a point about that whole piano-pieces-for-guitar thing, there.) 


We had a delightful visit from some of the cast and crew of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels at the Old Town Playhouse in Traverse City, brightening up a gray and rainy day in Studio A.  The show opened in early October at the Old Town Playhouse, and runs through October 25th. According to the New York Times, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels is a high-spirited comedy that, "aims to vault over the lines of good taste." 

The cast, and director Perez, were quite pleased with that description, and recommend the show for audiences over 18, but they were kind enough to bring us material that was left us utterly tickled - and reasonably un-scandalized.
 


Christopher Gruits, Executive Director of Interlochen Presents, stopped by Studio B this morning to chat about the upcoming 2014-2015 season. Highlights include: singer/songwriter Loudon Wainwright III, Aquila Theatre's Wuthering Heights,  Ailey II from the Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation, and the holiday classic, A Christmas Carol, from the Nebraska Theatre Caravan.

To hear the interview, featuring a track by singer/songwriter Wainwright (appearing at ICA in October), click "Listen," below.

Tickets go on sale soon - keep your eye on tickets.interlochen.org.  

After the jump - more highlights of the upcoming season, including video from Ailey II and A Christmas Carol.

Jenie Altruda has found a happy balance between a professional life and an artsy upbringing here at Interlochen. After growing up surrounded by various artistes and theatre types, ICA gives her the opportunity to combine business expertise with a love of the arts.

We spent a terrific hour together listening to some of her favorite music.  This is a cool, eclectic mix, with everything from favorites you might know and love (Bach Cello Suite, anyone?) to pieces new to IPR that may become new favorites (Goat Rodeo! Giacchino! Duckworth!).

Jenie had so much great music that we couldn't fit it all into our hour together on-air.  Never fear! You can still hear it all - click, "Read more," to see a list and enjoy more than two hours of Jenie's choices. Listen to our full conversation and hear the music in context in the streaming link, below.


Les Miserables is one of those "dream" shows for actors in musical theatre.  If you've never done it, you pray you'll be in it, and if you've been in it, you'll never forget it. This summer, Interlochen Arts Camp students had a chance to do the dream show with a dream team - Rick and Lynne Church.  Rick was the show's Musical Director and Conductor, and Lynne served as Vocal Coach for the young singers.  The delightful Churches have had fascinating careers (so far - more to come!) and brought all their expertise to the actors.  To us, they brought terrific music from Les Mis and music that Victor Hugo might have been listening to when he was writing his epic about the French Revolution. BONUS for those listening to the stream - Lynne shared a recording of her own performance in Pagliacci! (We've substituted Maria Callas on our Spotify playlist; click, "Read more." )

There's more to a Symphony Orchestra than musicians - somebody's got to keep everything ticking behind the scenes! Executive Director Krista Cooper helps keep the Traverse Symphony Orchestra running like clockwork.  Krista prefers to be behind the scenes (even though she's secretly an accomplished opera singer! Shhh...), but we managed to get her in front of a microphone, sharing some of her favorite music with us.  

Hear Krista and her music in the interview below, or click, "Read more," to listen all the music in one playlist.

Deb Lake managed to eke out an hour before the Traverse City Film Festival and share some of her favorite film music with us.  It was probably the most time she'd spent sitting down in weeks. Deb's been the Executive Director of the TCFF since 2006 and has been a volunteer with the Festival since its very first year.  Film Festival is her Crunch Time, so we had a lovely breather, listening to some great music together. Don't worry if you missed it - we have it right here. 

Hear the music and conversation below, or click, "Read more," to listen to the playlist. 


Brooklyn Rider takes the idea of the string quartet to a new level.  Already champions of new music and fresh approaches, the Brooklyn, NY-based group stretch the boundaries of the classic quartet, adding unusual instruments and other forms of art to the mix.  In their Studio A session, they treated us to terrific, high-energy performances of, "Doina Oltului," a Roma-inspired piece, and, "Ascending Bird," originally arranged for quartet and Persian Fiddle (kamancheh).
 


Chris Gruits, Executive Director of Interlochen Presents, is dropping by Classical IPR twice a week to give updates on upcoming events at the Interlochen Festival.

In today's chat, he fills us in about the upcoming WYSO concert featuring Guest Conductor Carlos Kalmar and Pianist Alessio Bax, and a visit from The Capitol Steps.

For information about all Interlochen Festival Events, visit: tickets. interlochen.org.
 


Well, this was a new one for Studio A:  a room full of musicians who can assemble and disassemble a saxophone and an M-16 rifle.  The US Airmen of Note, the premier jazz ensemble of the United States Air Force Band came by to play us some cool arrangements and chat about life as full-time military musicians.


Carol Jantsch is known for elevating tuba playing to performance art (she's performed Flight of the Bumblebee in full bee suit and advertised her first tuba CD with a rap video). She is also the first woman to hold a Principal Tuba Chair among major orchestras in the United States (in this case, the Philadelphia Orchestra). Jantsch is at Interlochen this week, teaching the Tuba and Trombone Institute.

Jantsch says she thinks of herself as a musician first, and a tuba player second, and she's interested in playing pieces not originally intended for the tuba.  She visited Studio A with accompanist Ellen Sommer-Bottorf and performed a wonderful rendition of Debussy's, Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun.  If you think the tuba is nothing more than a background instrument that goes oom-pa-pa - you're in for an elegant surprise.


William VerMeulen has had a life full of connections to Interlochen.  His mother came here to attend Music Camp and play the cello in the 1940's, and later, was a participant in our Adult Chamber Music Camp.  He attended Interlochen as a Camper, and then later, as an Academy Student.  He even worked in food service in the cafeteria, and eventually spent three years as an Academy Horn Instructor.  "I've done," he says, " everything you could do at Interlochen, and now to be back is a thrill."


NMC Choir Director Jeffrey Cobb brought the Canticum Novum ensemble by Studio A for a sneak preview of the group's upcoming concert series.  The twenty-four singers, with pianist Peggy Johnson, performed a warm, spicy and modern tango, "Noche de Lluvia," by Sid Robinovitch.  They then followed up with a jazzified slice of Americana in an arrangement of, "Country Dances," by Ward Swingle.


Lynne Tobin,  Director of the Traverse City Civic Ensembles, spent an early morning hour in Studio B co-hosting an early hour with Kate Botello. Lynne brought great music with her, including highlights from the upcoming holiday concert season. She even brought us a double-header Kids' Commute!


Interlochen Arts Academy Instructor of Film and Screenwriting drops by Studio B to guest host Morning Classical with Kate Botello! Lesley shared some of her favorite film music with listeners.  Click to listen.


Recent Interlochen graduate, piano performance major ChaoJun Yang, dropped by Studio A to perform a preview of her upcoming concerts.  ChaoJun performed Franz Liszt's "Hungarian Rhapsody #9, which is on her performance program.

ChaoJun will perform the Liszt, as well as Beethoven's "Waldstein" Sonata and works by Bach, Chopin and more at her series of upcoming concerts.  She's raising money to help with her college tuition, and has started her own independent fundraising project on the site, gofundme.com.

Brass Quintet

Jan 30, 2013

AA Students Aden Beery (tuba), Elmer Churampi (trumpet), Morgan Low (trumpet), Alex Melzer (trombone) and Markus Osterlund (horn) are members of an IAA Brass Quintet preparing for the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition.

Click to listen as they visit with Kate Botello in Studio A to play a colorful collection of brass music in different styles.  You'll hear two movements of a famous "Quintet" from Malcolm Arnold, Samuel Scheidt's Renaissance piece, "Canzona Bergamasca," and the kicky and fun "Killer Tango" by Sonny Kompanek.

As part of a project with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, young pianists have been invited to participate in an epic performance of all 32 of  Beethoven's piano sonatas. Five of those pianists are from Interlochen, and all will be playing their sonatas Live from Studio A over the next couple of weeks. (You can see those performances in Detroit on February 7th, 2013).

Here, Interlochen Senior Ariela Bohrod joins Kate Botello in Studio A to perform Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 15, Opus 28 (otherwise known as the "Pastoral") in its entirety.  Enjoy!

Live from Studio A

Jan 21, 2013

On Tuesday, January 22nd 2013 at 7:30 in Milliken Auditorium, Chamber Music North will present renowned baritone David Small, along with pianist Stephen Wogaman, performing Schubert's famous song cycle, "Winterreise."

Small and Wogman joined Kate Botello live in Studio A to perform a couple of pieces from the cycle ("The Grey Head" and "The Crow") and talked about the music's significance and meaning - and how sometimes pain can be a "good" - or at least moving and beautiful - thing.

We had such a great time with Brian J. Nash  - Off-Broadway Musical Director and Interlochen Alum -  and Natalie Douglas - cabaret diva & 7-time MAC (Manhattan Association of Cabarets and Clubs) Award Winner -  at the IPR Studios! First, they co-hosted the morning shift with Kate Botello. Brian shared some of his favorite classical music and Interlochen memories, and Natalie took us on a toe-tapping, educational trip through the Great American Songbook. Next, they hopped over to Studio A to perform, bringing us a couple of great standards and a beautiful Broadway tune.

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