michigan primary

Morgan Springer

It could be a competitive race for Michigan’s 104th house seat this coming election. The district covers Grand Traverse County. Republicans have held this seat firmly for at least 20 years.

The Michigan primary is fast approaching. Democrats and Republicans will head to the polls Tuesday to decide who they want to represent their party in the November governor’s race. Three Democratic candidates hope they’ll be chosen, and money – and the television ads it buys – has played an interesting role in the Democratic race so far.


One of Michigan's marquee races is the one to replace retiring Republican Rep. Dan Benishek in the 1st Congressional District.

 

The district covers the entire Upper Peninsula and much of the northern Lower Peninsula.

State Sen. Tom Casperson and former State Sen. Jason Allen were hoping to make the November ballot.

So was a retired three-star Marine Lieutenant General named Jack Bergman.

The official vote totals are still not quite finalized, but it was a shocking – some are saying historic – night for the Democrats in the Michigan Primary. Donald Trump continued to hold serve on the Republican side, winning the Great Lakes State by a comfortable margin, but it was Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ win over Hillary Clinton that dominated the headlines on Wednesday morning.

(This story was updated at 9:55am on February 2, 2016) 

Michigan's open primary is on March 8th. 

Michigan Radio's senior political analyst Jack Lessenberry stops by Stateside to explore the nuances of  Michigan's 2016 primary with host Cynthia Canty.

Zoe Clark co-hosts Michigan Radio’s It’s Just Politics. She joined Stateside to talk about the primary election results.

Here are a few highlights of the interview:

  • Clark said the fight between the Republican Party and the Tea Party seems to be at a draw with winners like Justin Amash, David Trott, and Mike Bishop.
  • Proposal 1 passed.
  • It’s the end of a long political career for Wayne County Executive Robert Ficano.
  • Debbie Dingell and Brenda Lawrence are one step closer to seats in Congress.

*Listen to the full interview with Zoe Clark above. 

Today is primary election day in Michigan. But one thing might be missing from the polls: voters.

Many political watchers expect very low turnout for the primary. In fact, some say Michigan could see a historic low number of voters casting ballots.

Jake Neher is the capitol reporter for the Michigan Public Radio Network. He said it’s too early to say what's keeping voters away from the polls.

Neher said possible reasons can vary from the crowded primaries to people being away on summer vacation.

Neher said another reason could be that there is nobody at the top of the ticket in a primary against the governor or for the U.S. Senate race.

*Listen to the full interview above.