invasive

Don Harrison on Flickr

 

 


Brian Allen was kayaking through Arcadia Marsh when something big and white dove at him. He had to use his paddle to defend himself from the attacker — a mute swan.

Invasive or not? A Great Lakes Puzzle

Aug 23, 2017
Central Michigan University

Around the Great Lakes, millions of dollars are spent to fight invasive species like Asian carp. They cause a lot of damage. But when scientists discover a new animal or plant in the region, it’s not always clear if it’s harmful - or helpful.

That debate has begun over a shrimp.

The bloody red shrimp is roughly the size of a pencil eraser. They came to the Great Lakes around 2006, hitching a ride in the ballast water of cargo ships from the Black Sea.

Since then, they’ve worked their way into all of the Great Lakes except Superior.

Audio Postcard: Foraging for Garlic Mustard

May 16, 2013

You may be aware that morel season is upon us, but perhaps you didn't know that prime garlic mustard picking season is just coming to a close.  While no one would want to over-harvest morels, the goal with the also edible garlic mustard, is to get rid of it. The plant can get out of control to the point where it makes it difficult for native plants to thrive.  That's happened in some parts of southern Michigan.

Plans For Lamprey Barrier In UP Move Forward

Aug 13, 2012

Michigan will take ownership of a dam on the Manistique River in the Upper Peninsula. That will allow the federal government to build a new barrier there to keep sea lampreys from breeding in the river. Managers of the fishery expect that will bring the lamprey problem under control in Lake Michigan.

The number of sea lampreys remains high in Lakes Michigan, Huron and Erie, according to a new report to the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. The eel-like fish was one of the first invasive species to arrive in the lake. It frequently kills lake trout and can also harm white fish and salmon.

According to the report, the number of lampreys in Lakes Michigan and Huron is just above the goal, but the problem with sea lamprey is most serious in Lake Erie. There are believed to be more lampreys in Erie now then there were when control programs began there.