domestic violence

Today on Stateside, we talk to a Republican state senator who says that Governor Whitmer’s extension of the emergency stay at home order goes too far. Plus, how students with disabilities who rely on schools for important services are faring at home. 

Stories like that of Nicole Beverly, whose abusive husband is set to be released from prison in August despite alleged threats to kill her and her children, are nothing new for Barbara Niess-May, executive director of SafeHouse Center in Ann Arbor.

“Her story is common, in that there are many survivors who find themselves needing to relocate because of the assailant,” Niess-May said. “What’s uncommon is the fact that she has gone public with her story.”

Update October 20, 9:30 a.m.:

Nicole Beverly took the stand yesterday to testify against her ex-husband, and saw the man who has threatened her life and the lives of their sons for the first time since he was sent to prison for stalking her in 2012.

After her testimony, Ann Arbor District Judge Karen Quinlan Valvo ruled that there is sufficient evidence for Kevin Beverly to stand trial against the new charges brought forward by Attorney General Bill Schuette. Those charges include witness intimidation and extortion.

 


“All she wanted to do was leave.”

 

That’s how Barbara Niess-May, executive director of SafeHouse Center in Ann Arbor, described the case of Francine Hughes of Dansville, Michigan.

Women's Resource Center

For over 40 years, the Women’s Resource Center in Traverse City has provided shelter and relief to victims of domestic violence. The center operates a crisis hotline and a 22-bed shelter, among other services.

But the Women’s Resource Center has recently come under criticism. Former employees say a new management style has led to the departure of many experienced workers, and some services have been cut.

The Next Idea

How does a community address domestic violence and sexual assault when calling the police is not often an option?