documentary

Today on Stateside, we talk with Congresswoman Debbie Dingell about the loss of her husband and his  last words to America. Plus, we continue our look into Michigan's mental health services for children, with a conversation about the state's dire shortage of child and adolescent psychiatrists. 

A new documentary remembers Interlochen's glacial history to the present.
Chris Hintz

When the lumber industry moved into northern Michigan’s forests, settlements popped up everywhere. But when the trees were gone, the lumber camps moved on to new areas and the communities left behind would often fade away.

A new documentary tells the story of why the village of Interlochen was different.

 


President Trump and his supporters say they want to "make America great again," but just what that means and what part of America's past they refer to as "the greatest" is unclear.

Given our nation's turbulent history when it comes to the treatment of people of color and women, there are some who feel that slogan is not meant to include them.

“Inspiration in the wake of desperation.” That’s the theme of a powerful documentary called For Flint.

In the film, director Brian Schulz shows the foundation for a rebuilt Flint can be found in the lives of its neighbors.

There are more than 1,600 juveniles now living in state facilities in Michigan.

Most young people in residential treatment or detention centers are people of color. Many often become defined by their experience, both legally and socially.

A new documentary film Determined 2 Make It tells their stories and shows how art, music, photography and more can be powerful forms of self-expression for incarcerated youth.

For most of us, our view of the bloody civil war in Syria is limited to snippets of video seen on network or cable news.

But a new documentary film gives us a staggering inside view of the Syrian Revolution.

TCFF 2016 Panel: Come to the Doc Side

Jul 28, 2016

The festival kicked off the first full day with a stage full of documentary filmmakers talking about the issues they have followed and the craft of filmmaking.

 

CREEM Magazine began in 1969, sold from the trunk of Barry Kramer’s car. Kramer was the creator and publisher of the magazine, and from that small beginning, it blossomed into one of the top music publications in the world. It was bold in its irreverence, and it launched the careers of some of music’s biggest names — both artists and writers.

When you see a college football team run out onto the field, it's hard to remember that not so long ago, few, if any, of those young players would be black. 

A powerful documentary from filmmaker Maya Washington tells the story of when and how that changed. 

Through the Banks of the Red Cedar shows us the way Michigan State University coach Duffy Daugherty confronted racism on the football field by bringing young black players from the South to East Lansing. 

When Ingham County Prosecutor Stuart Dunnings III was charged with a wide range of prostitution-related crimes, it managed to refocus attention on sex crimes and human trafficking in Michigan.
 
Victims of these crimes include people forced to sell their bodies for sex and people used for cheap labor.
 

Break the Chain, a new documentary on human trafficking in Michigan, premiers next month. 

Filmmaker Laura Swanson and human trafficking survivor Debbie joined Cynthia Canty on today's Stateside.

 

When you ask anyone about women’s professional baseball, the majority of people will make some reference to director Penny Marshall’s 1992 film A League of Their Own. The movie stars Tom Hanks, Geena Davis, and Madonna and tells the story of the real-life Rockford Peaches of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL).

Shattuck family

This is a story about love and family. 

Trisha Shattuck is transgender. Her spouse, Marcia, chose to stay with her as Trisha transitioned from a masculine to more feminine presentation. But the transition was a challenge for Trisha’s family. Their story is captured in a recent documentary, "From This Day Forward," the making of which helped the family talk more openly with each other. 

 

Aaron Selbig

Documentary filmmaker Rick Prelinger makes films that are carefully pieced together from his collection of more than 14,000 home movies.

Two of them are playing this week at the Traverse City Film Festival. One film takes a look at the American road trip. The other is sort of a time capsule of the city of Detroit.

This week marks the four year anniversary of the magnitude nine earthquake that hit the coast of Japan and triggered a tsunami, leaving well over 15,000 people dead. The tsunami also caused the largest nuclear accident since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.

    

There’s a new video documentary that looks at immigration from a woman’s perspective. The documentary is called Vanishing BordersAlexandra Hidalgo directed and produced the film. She's an assistant professor in the Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures at Michigan State University.

The four women featured in Vanishing Borders are Teboho Moja, Melainie Rogers, Daphnie Sicre, and Yatna Vakharia. Hidalgo says she was looking for people who had compelling stories and who could be eloquent and not afraid of the camera.