Classical Music

James Gilray, "The Pic-nic Orchestra" (1802)
Credit https://collections.nlm.nih.gov/catalog/nlm:nlmuid-101455846-img

Interlochen Public Radio is your gateway to news and classical music from Interlochen Center for the Arts. Learn about new music, upcoming performances and more.

The Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki turned 80 on Saturday. You may think you've never heard Penderecki's music, but I'm guessing you have — because I'm guessing you've seen The Shining.

There's a beguiling photo of Krzysztof Penderecki, who turns 80 today, inside the brochure of this week's Warsaw music festival that bears his name. It shows the lauded Polish composer standing in his immense garden, surrounded by a labyrinth of trees and shrubbery trimmed to symmetrical perfection.

Composer Benjamin Britten was born 100 years ago today, and the occasion is being marked by performances of his music around the world, from Carnegie Hall in New York to Memorial Hall in Tokyo.

Britten was a central figure of 20th-century classical music: He was a conductor, pianist and festival producer, as well as a composer. His best-known works include the opera Billy Budd, his War Requiem and The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra.

Detroit sure has seen its share of challenges in the past

4o years, but all through that time the city has been home to one of the most vibrant regional opera companies in the nation: The Michigan Opera Theatre.

The founder of the MOT is Dr. David DiChiera.

He’s recently been named the 2013 Kresge Eminent Artist. That prize is the Kresge Foundation’s annual lifetime achievement award in the Arts.

It’s been called the most prestigious local prize in the field of culture. David, We welcomed David to the program today.

*Listen to the audio above.

I'm a bit of a cynic when it comes to composer anniversaries but this year, marking 100 years since the birth of Benjamin Britten, has been absolutely fascinating for me. I am now living proof that such centenaries can indeed change the way we look at a composer and provide us with opportunities to explore their breadth and depth. In Britten I have found a new hero, a musically surprising and multi-dimensional citizen of the world.

If you're going to be cooking Thanksgiving dinner next week, you've probably already started gathering the traditional ingredients — but your ingredients are most likely very different from those that made up the first Thanksgiving meal in 1621. (Marshmallows with those sweet potatoes, anyone?)

Each year, Interlochen Arts Camp becomes home to the World Youth Symphony Orchestra, high-school age musicians working with renowned conductors from all over the world.

In the second of our 2013 episodes, Maestro Jung Ho Pak, WYSO's Musical Director, conducts the musicians in Sergei Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 2, featuring violinist Jennifer Koh, and Richard Strauss's tone poem, Don Juan.

Each year, Interlochen Arts Camp becomes home to the World Youth Symphony Orchestra, high-school age musicians working with renowned conductors from all over the world.

In the first of our 2013 episodes, conductor JoAnn Falletta leads the WYSO in performances of Albert Roussel's Bacchus et Ariane, Suite No. 2 and Eric Ewazen's Triple Concerto for Three Trombones and Orchestra.

Composer Benjamin Britten, whose 100th birth anniversary falls on Nov. 22nd, is so deeply associated with his native England that he's on a new 50-pence coin issued by the Royal Mint.

Gerard Schwarz on Island Cabin Discs

Nov 19, 2013

Jeff Kimpton hosts Island Cabin Discs on Interlochen Public Radio, asking guests to share the music they would take with them to an island cabin getaway. 

On this episode of Island Cabin Discs, world-renowned conductor Gerard Schwarz shares his choice of musical essentials.

Learn more about Gerard Schwarz here.

British composer Benjamin Britten was born 100 years ago this Friday, Nov. 22. Before you ask "Benja-who?" consider this: Did you see Wes Anderson's film Moonrise Kingdom last summer, or Pedro Almodovar's Talk to Her back a decade or so ago? (Well, maybe you have to be an art-house denizen for those.

In the classical music world right now, many eyes are focused on Jeremy Denk.

Last March, when the San Francisco Symphony was slated for an East Coast tour, including a stop at Carnegie Hall, the musicians went on strike. Fortunately, the labor dispute was settled in 18 days — a blink of an eye compared to the recent drawn-out disruptions in Minnesota and Detroit. Still, it left New Yorkers hungry for the San Francisco Symphony's brand of tonal luminescence and programming bravado, nurtured by forward-thinking conductor Michael Tilson Thomas.

Mezzo-soprano/author/jewelry designer Laurie Rubin dropped by IPR's Studio A before leading a master class with Interlochen's Opera students.  Laurie, an acclaimed performer, recently released her memoir, Do You Dream In Color? Insights from a Girl Without Sight.  She spoke with IPR's Kate Botello about how she approaches the challenges of singing without sight, and sang an inspiring song she co-wrote with partner Jennifer Taira for her new album. 

Suren Bagratuni

Oct 17, 2013

Cellist Suren Bagratuni dropped by Studio A with Maestro Kevin Rhodes of the Traverse Symphony Orchestra. The pair were preparing for a huge concert - Dvorak's Cello Concerto and Ninth Symphony ("From the New World"), held at the end of September.  Suren delighted us with performances of Tsintsadze's, "Chonguri" (played without a bow!) and Marin Marais's, "La Reveuse," - exclusive treats in this command performance for IPR listeners!  Suren had a lot of fascinating things to say, and even Kevin got in on the interview act.  

Click above to listen. 

The Oakland Trio

Jun 26, 2013

The Oakland Trio (Cellist Debra Fayroian, violinist Adrienne Ronmark and pianist Stephen Wogaman) visited IPR's Studio A prior to their Arcturos Concert Series appearance in Suttons Bay.  While in the studio, they performed the second movement of Mendelssohn's  Trio in d minor, Opus 49.

Harpist Danielle Paus

Jun 18, 2013

Harpist Danielle Paus returned to the Interlochen campus for the first time in about ten years, and one of her stops was IPR's studio A. She gave a live performance of  this Swedish polska during her visit.

Recent Interlochen graduate, piano performance major ChaoJun Yang, dropped by Studio A to perform a preview of her upcoming concerts.  ChaoJun performed Franz Liszt's "Hungarian Rhapsody #9, which is on her performance program.

ChaoJun will perform the Liszt, as well as Beethoven's "Waldstein" Sonata and works by Bach, Chopin and more at her series of upcoming concerts.  She's raising money to help with her college tuition, and has started her own independent fundraising project on the site, gofundme.com.

Linsdey Anderson - Live in IPR's Studio A

Apr 19, 2013

Pulitzer-winning composer Ned Rorem is most noted for his art songs.  Here's mezzo-soprano Lindsey Anderson performing Rorem's "Rain in Spring," Live in IPR's Studio A.


Piano Sonata fills Studio A

Feb 5, 2013

Beethoven's Piano sonata  in Eb, Opus 7, performed on the air by Kevin Takeda.

"Les Adieux" from Studio A

Jan 31, 2013

Nathaniel Mo, a senior at Interlochen Arts Academy, performs Beethoven's Piano Sonata #26, "Les Adieux"

Brass Quintet

Jan 30, 2013

AA Students Aden Beery (tuba), Elmer Churampi (trumpet), Morgan Low (trumpet), Alex Melzer (trombone) and Markus Osterlund (horn) are members of an IAA Brass Quintet preparing for the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition.

Click to listen as they visit with Kate Botello in Studio A to play a colorful collection of brass music in different styles.  You'll hear two movements of a famous "Quintet" from Malcolm Arnold, Samuel Scheidt's Renaissance piece, "Canzona Bergamasca," and the kicky and fun "Killer Tango" by Sonny Kompanek.

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