Classical Music

Interlochen Public Radio has the latest in classical music. You'll find recent local concerts, live performances from our very own Studio A, classical music for kids and so much more. 

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Repose is an hour of beautiful and relaxing music. You can hear it every weeknight at 10 p.m. on Classical IPR, with new episodes every Saturday at 10 p.m.

 

Monday Ep080405

Peter Kater - Ascent

David Lanz - A Whiter Shade of Pale

Jeanette Alexander - The Road to Caernarvon  

Autumn's Child - Row of White Trees

Jeffrey Michael - Indigo Falls

Back in the days before the coronavirus pandemic, lots of people found community and comfort in singing together, whether at school, as a form of worship, in amateur groups or performing as professionals. Last year, Chorus America reported that some 54 million Americans — that is, more than 15% of the entire country's population — participated in some kind of organized group singing. And that study revealed that nearly three-quarters of those polled felt less lonely.

Great Lakes Concerts: August 10, 2020

Aug 9, 2020
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Great Lakes Concerts is a co-production of Interlochen Public Radio, WKAR and WRCJ. Listen every Monday at 6 p.m. on Classical IPR.

This week's playlist:

 

Ludwig van Beethoven: "Egmont" Overture, Op. 84
Traverse Symphony Orchestra
Kevin Rhodes, conductor
(Recorded February 17, 2019, Corson Auditorium, Interlochen)

Peter Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 6 in b minor, Op. 74, "Pathetique"
Lansing Symphony Orchestra
Timothy Muffitt, conductor
(recorded March 30th, 2019 at Wharton Center)

When cases of the coronavirus spiked in March, doctors and nurses across the country found themselves overwhelmed with work. The shutdown also took away an important creative outlet for a special breed of medical professional: classical musicians. That's why John Masko, a symphony conductor in Boston, founded the National Virtual Medical Orchestra, giving those in the medical field a chance to perform and connect with each other.

"I kept hearing from musician after musician from our ensemble [about] how much they wish they were playing," Masko says.

GAMEPLAY: Breath of the Wild

Aug 8, 2020
By Source, Fair use: Wikipedia entry

  On GAMEPLAY this week, we’re going to explore the innovative, spacious, and eclectic soundtrack to the Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a 2017 game release whose original score pays homage to themes from 30 years of series history, while taking the sound of the Zelda franchise in a fresh, new direction.

Featured on today's program were the Hungarian Dances by Johannes Brahams.  A set of 21 pieces composed originally for piano, four hands, they are based on Hungarian themes.  

1.      George Frederick Handel, Concerto Grosso No. 11, Boston Baroque, Martin Pearlman

2.     Antonin Dvorak, O Silver Moon from Rusalka, Renee Fleming, London Symphony Orchestra, Sir Georg Solti

3.     Philip Sparke, Strathcarron-Sword Dance from Hymn of the Highlands, Brass Band Froschl Hall, Hannes Buchegger

Interlochen Center for the Arts

In 1977, Interlochen Center for the Arts celebrated its 50th camp season.

A World Youth Symphony Orchestra concert on August 7 featured guest conductor Howard Hanson.

Hanson had conducted student orchestras at Interlochen since the camp's first summer in 1928. 

On Monday, August 10, the nationally syndicated program Performance Today will feature music performed and recorded at Interlochen Center for the Arts.

Tune in during the 11 a.m. hour of the program to hear pianist Wu Han and violinist Alexander Sitkovetsky perform Souvenir d'un lieu cher by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky. The performance was from a recent recital they and colleagues from the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center presented in the Dendrinos Chapel and Recital Hall.

Michael Culler engineered the recording.

Multi-instrumentalist Kevin LaRose is also an Interlochen Center for the Arts campus safety officer. 

 Every Thursday at 3 a.m. during his rounds,  Kevin makes a video of himself playing a different instrument in a variety of locations on the Interlochen campus.

Scroll down to see Kevin's video for the week.

Can you correctly identify (1) what instrument he's playing, and/or (2) where on the Interlochen campus he is?

Helen Jones Woods, who played trombone with the International Sweethearts of Rhythm, a history-making all-female big band that toured widely during World War II, died of COVID-19 on July 25 in Sarasota, Fla. She was 96.

Her daughter Cathy Hughes, founder and chairperson of the broadcast media company Urban One, confirmed the details of her death to NPR.

Outdoors: Lazy circles in the sky

Aug 5, 2020

A few years back, the annual musical at Interlochen Arts Camp was "Oklahoma!" 

The Juniors all went to the dress rehearsal, and the next day, one of the campers asked, "Why do hawks make lazy circles in the sky?"

Understand that hawks hunt from the sky, so the higher they fly, the more area they can see.

Their eyesight is phenomenal. Apparently, birds of prey can see in the ultraviolet range of the spectrum, which turns out to be important.

Classical IPR in Concert: Nicholas Goluses

Aug 4, 2020

This week Classical IPR in Concert features guitarist Nicholas Goluses.

Goluses is Professor of Guitar at the Eastman School of Music. His concert tours have taken him across North America, South America, Europe, Australia and Asia to critical acclaim.

In 2019, Nicholas Goluses performed in the Dendrinos Chapel/Recital Hall at Interlochen Center for the Arts.

The program included works by Fernando Sor, Johann Sebastian Bach, Maria Newman, Mikis Theodorakis and more. See the complete concert program below.

New York's Metropolitan Opera, armed with technology, today's top singers and a captive, home-bound audience is, in spite of them, struggling to make opera relevant. The company's new streaming series, Met Stars Live in Concert, while a valiant endeavor, can't seem to shake off opera's fusty, aristocratic trappings.

On this edition of The Interlochen Collection, it’s spiritual music from around the world.

 
Listen to the entire episode below. 

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Enjoy Repose on Classical IPR every weeknight at 10 p.m. New episodes air every Saturday at 10 p.m.

 

Monday Ep090110

Gayle Cloud - Believe In Me

Nick Farr - Winter Prayer

Celtic Woman - Harry's Game

Robin Spielberg - Until You Come Home

Marc Enfroy - Empire Bluff

Jim Wilson - A Place in My Heart

Yanni - In the Mirror

One of America's most beloved and resourceful pianists has died. Leon Fleisher was 92 years old. He died of cancer in Baltimore Sunday morning, according to his son, Julian.

The pianist's roller coaster career began with fame, moved to despair and ended in fulfillment.

Composer Max Richter has scored soundtracks and had his music placed across film and television, including recent Hollywood movies such as Mary Queen of Scots, Hostiles and Ad Astra. But Richter's also a composer who's not afraid to take on political issues in his music.

Great Lakes Concerts: August 3, 2020

Aug 2, 2020

Great Lakes Concerts is a co-production of Interlochen Public Radio, WKAR and WRCJ. Listen every Monday at 6 p.m. on Classical IPR.

This week's playlist:

Patrick Harlin: Shadow Dancer
Lansing Symphony Orchestra
Timothy Muffitt, conductor
(Recorded live at Wharton Center on October 11, 2019

Peter Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 in e minor, Op. 64
Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra
Morihiko Nakahara, conductor
(Recorded in Michigan Theater on November 2, 2019)
 

 

 

Ancient Pages

Happy Swiss National Day! Featured on today's program was the William Tell Overture from Gioacchino Rossini's opera, William Tell.   This popular work features a depiction of a storm and viviacious finale "The March of the Swiss soldiers".  William Tell is a legenday folk hero of Switzerland who symbolizes the struggle for political and individual freedom. 

1.     Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Sonata in F major, Andre Watts

2.    Aaron Copland, Appalachian Spring, New York Philharmonic Leonard Bernstein

Classical IPR in Concert: Michael Coonrod

Jul 30, 2020

This week on Classical IPR in Concert, pianist Michael Coonrod performs in his Northern Michigan home. 

Because of Covid-19, many artists have found newer ways to connect with an audience. Michael Coonrod recorded a concert to be shared digitally.

The performance includes music by Johannes Brahms and Robert Schumann. Tune in on Classical IPR this Friday at 8 p.m., Sunday at noon, or listen below at any time.

Multi-instrumentalist Kevin LaRose is also an Interlochen Center for the Arts campus safety officer. 

 Every Thursday at 3 a.m. during his rounds,  Kevin makes a video of himself playing a different instrument in a variety of locations on the Interlochen campus.

Scroll down to see Kevin's video for the week.

Can you correctly identify (1) what instrument he's playing, and/or (2) where on the Interlochen campus he is?

GAMEPLAY: Classics

Jul 30, 2020

This week on GAMEPLAY, we’ll sample music from some of the classics: games that are not only huge critical and commercial successes, but that have also withstood the test of time. 

 

Many have expanded into decades-long series, deepening their stories and sometimes reinventing themselves. 

 

They’ve been played and loved for many years, and these games keep on winning over new fans today.

Outdoors: Renaissance of trees

Jul 29, 2020

From 1450 to 1620, dramatic changes took place in Europe. The period, now called the Renaissance, resulted from a complex interaction of factors that brought about changes in politics, religion, economics and the arts.

I've recently read a number of articles that suggested that a pandemic led to the Renaissance - a hopeful thought, because during that time, educated people came to believe they could learn from nature.

Science as we know it came to be.

Two controversies broke out this week regarding accusations of anti-Black racism in classical music. One involved two high-profile international soloists, pianist Yuja Wang and violinist Leonidas Kavakos. The other features less prominent individuals — a group of academics — but it also points to the slowness of the classical music community to take up difficult conversations about race and representation.

Updated on Aug. 6 at 8:06 a.m. ET

In April 1945, Madame Roos wrote a letter to French authorities describing her piano she was hoping to get back. Roos, who was 72, was Jewish and her piano had been stolen when Nazis emptied her apartment in Paris.

A similar fate befell many of the 75,000 French Jews deported to concentration camps during World War II.

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