Arts & Culture

 

Today is the 20th anniversary of Frank Sinatra's death, but he lives on in Bob Anderson​. Anderson has been a fixture in Vegas and on stages all around the country with his show, "Frank. The Man. The Music."

 

 

The Detroit Public Theatre is wrapping up its third season with a new play that it commissioned: "Birthday Candles." It's written by Noah Haidle, a Grand Rapids native. 


   

Last week, the Board of State Canvassers approved a ballot petition that might end the prohibition of recreational marijuana in Michigan

 

Meanwhile, this week marked the 100th anniversary of another important social experiment: Prohibition. 

 

 

Some 11 million people were killed during the Holocaust, and those who survived have lived so long, they're now watching the world forget. 

 

A recent poll shows 66 percent of American millennials don't know what Auschwitz is. Another 22 percent had not heard of the Holocaust or weren't sure if they had. 

 

It’s easy to picture “comfort food,” but what about “discomfort food?”

That’s what Tunde Wey will be serving up in the pop-restaurant Saartj, running from May 2 to May 5 inside the community space Bank Suey in Hamtramck.

On the first day that Michael Gustafson and his wife Hilary opened Literati Bookstore in the heart of downtown Ann Arbor, something possessed him to place a typewriter on a table for anyone to use.

That was in the spring of 2013. Since then, Gustafson’s “public typewriter experiment” has yielded a treasure trove of notes: some droll, some heartbreaking, some witty, some poignant.

Let’s talk about Celtic music. Nessa, a Southeast Michigan band, re-imagines the ballads and dance tunes of the old Celtic world, bringing in a wide range of musical styles.

The ensemble is led by Kelly McDermott, who plays the flute and sings. She joined Stateside to talk about her musical influences, Celtic fusion, and the release of her new EP, Travel Walk to Celtica, produced by Brian Bill.

 

As controversy swirled around Bob Dylan's 2017 Nobel prize for literature, some argued that Dylan wasn't even the first songwriter to win the prize. That honor may belong to Indian songwriter, poet and philosopher Rabindranath Tagore.  

Ever since the arrival of Europeans to Michigan, farming has been a key economic component for our state. However, without the life’s work of a Michigander from South Haven, farms in Michigan and across the nation might evolved quite differently.

Mark Harvey, State Archivist at the Michigan History Center, joined Stateside to discuss the life of pioneering botanist and horticulturist Liberty Hyde Bailey, how his “agrarian ideology” of advanced technology was received at the time, and how he’s remembered today.

Turning shame into pride.

That’s the idea behind an exhibit of black velvet paintings. It’s called “Black Velvet: A Rasquache Aesthetic,” and it’s happening at the Latino Cultural Center in Detroit's Mexicantown.

 

 

This time, David Kiley of Encore Michigan brings us an eclectic mix of shows from theaters across Michigan.

 

Listen above to hear Kiley’s previews of the following shows:

When Michigan’s economy tanked a decade ago, it stepped up a steady stream of young people leaving Michigan to seek work in Chicago.

Michael Ferro was one of those young Michiganders. His experience working for the federal government in the Windy City was the inspiration for his debut novel Title 13.

The Traverse Symphony Orchestra on Classical IPR

Mar 8, 2018

This Friday night Interlochen Public Radio brings you the TSO and legendary pianist Ralph Votapek. The program includes Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20, Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 3 “Scottish”, and Lacrimae Beati by Richard Danielpour. Kevin Rhodes conducts the concert from earlier in this 65th Anniversary Season for the Traverse Symphony Orchestra. This program airs at 8 p.m. on Classical IPR.

Things don't always fit together neatly. Life would be really boring if they did.

That's the driving idea behind a new podcast called Mismatch – "stories of the incompatible, the unsuitable, and the out-of-step."

The podcast will air during Stateside’s normal time slot (3-4 p.m. and 10-11 p.m.) on Monday, Feb. 26 and on Tuesday, Feb. 27.

Laura Checkoway just finished a film that is now being nominated for an Oscar. She’s the director, producer, and editor of a film called Edith+Eddie. It’s up for Best Documentary (Short Subject). She is from Ann Arbor.

Checkoway joined Stateside to discuss how she learned about Edith and Eddie, who at 96 and 95 are America’s oldest interracial newlyweds, how her film comments on America’s system of elder care, and what it feels like to receive an Oscar nomination.

 

 

A lot of Michigan residents might know that Malcolm X grew up in this state, but beyond that, the facts might get a little fuzzy. 

 

 

Michigan History Center’s Rachel Clark joined Stateside to bring some clarity to that history.

Each month, we take a listen to new music from Detroit-area artists.

This time, the theme is "anticipation." After some four years, Black Milk, Jack White, and Andrew W.K. are set to release new albums.

Researchers at Michigan State University are gathering every scrap of information they can to develop a huge database on the African slave trade throughout the centuries. The project is called Enslaved.

Librarian Annie Spence knows what it’s like to love a book so much she has to write it a love letter. She also knows what it’s like for a break-up letter to be in order.

Her letters to books fill the pages of her own new book Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks.

Jensen, Ondras, and Lockington on Classical IPR

Feb 9, 2018

This Friday evening Classical IPR presents a performance featuring violinist Dylana Jensen, violist Libor Ondras, and cellist David Lockington. The concert from the Great Lakes Chamber Orchestra Sunday Series was last month in Harbor Springs. Listen at 8 p.m.

Cynthia Lambert had the title many others dream of: sports reporter. She worked for the Detroit News covering the Red Wings for 12 seasons, including their Stanley Cup wins in 1997 and 1998.

Now she’s taken those seasons of sports reporting and packed them into her new memoir Power Play: My Life Inside The Red Wings Locker Room.

Detroit Symphony Orchestra - Live on Classical IPR

Feb 5, 2018

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra performs live Friday morning on Classical IPR. It’s an all Ravel concert conducted by Leonard Slatkin. Soloist Jean Efflam-Bavouzet is featured in both the G Major Piano Concerto and the Concerto for Left Hand. Also on the program are Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloé Suite No. 2 and Pavane pour une infant défunte. Listen live on Classical IPR at 10:40 a.m.

Metro Detroit native Saladin Ahmed has been writing for years. From poetry to short stories to novels, he has experimented in many genres. Ahmed’s most recent medium is graphic novels. He produced a comic book series called “Abbott.” It follows Elena Abbott, a hard-working African-American journalist in 1972 Detroit.

Stateside producer Mike Blank recently spoke with Saladin Ahmed at a book signing at the Vault of Midnight in Detroit.

 

When was the last time you heard about a politician who realized she or he needed to change to help the country – that former ways had to be put aside to foster bipartisan cooperation for the good of the country? 

 

A U.S. senator from Michigan, Arthur Vandenberg, was such a person. 

 


 

In the early days of making cars, many companies quickly appeared and then disappeared just as fast. 

 

In an article in Michigan History MagazineSteve Ostrander noted there were 34 automakers in the 1920s. One of them was named after a World War I flying ace — Eddie Rickenbacker. 

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