arts

Actor and international arts leader Eric Booth will be at Horizon Books in Traverse City on Tuesday, January 28 at 7 p.m. He’ll lead an open workshop on helping artists connect with audiences. 

Booth has acted on Broadway many times, taught at The Juilliard School and written seven books. He says most Americans feel like outsiders to the arts, and it is the artist’s responsibility to change that. He thinks everyone who works in the arts should have the same job title on their business cards: agent of artistic experience. 

Summer Music Series: Little Graves

Jul 27, 2018
Aaron Selbig

Morgan Arrowood has been belting out songs and banging away on keyboards since she was four years old. She says even back then - when her parents first signed her up for piano lessons - her style was bold, brash and loud.

"Poetry is good food."

That's the lesson award-winning writer Peter Markus has been teaching to kids in Detroit for years.

He taught creative writing in the Detroit Public Schools and he is the senior writer with the InsideOut Literary Arts Project, which places writers in public schools to hold creative writing workshops.

Joan Richmond in her studio near the Grand Traverse Commons.
Dan Wanschura

In the early nineteenth century, artists spent almost all their time inside studios. Instead of going outside, artists would usually sketch and paint from existing sketchings and paintings. 

The goal wasn’t to paint as realistically as possible, but as beautifully as possible. 

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot was different. He started taking his paint outside.

Traverse City-based artist Joan Richmond says Corot was an important link in leaving behind the idealized world in painting.   

Members of the chorus gossip about Medea's fate during a recent rehearsal.
Parallel 45 Theatre

Parallel 45 Theatre company is out with a fresh take on the ancient Greek tragedy Medea.
Throughout their advertising campaign, the company has been comparing what it meant to be a celebrity during Medea's day, versus what it means today, with the likes of Kim Kardashian and Lindsey Lohan.
Is it determined by the history books, or trends on Twitter?

Aaron Selbig

Meet Travis Duncan, manager of the Swamp of Suffering. That's the main attraction at Screams In the Dark, a big haunted house set up on the county fairgrounds near Traverse City.

Duncan plays a zombie that’s dressed as a member of a SWAT team. He and his small army of volunteers see themselves as something resembling a theatre troupe.

“This whole idea is to set up an illusion that you’re actually in a swamp," says Duncan. "You’re in a mausoleum, you’re in a graveyard. So we try to keep people in character so they can give that illusion and keep that illusion up.”

"Fearless. Fresh. Made in Detroit.”

That's the motto of the Detroit Public Theatre, whose mission is to produce theater with top writers, directors, and actors in Midtown Detroit's growing cultural district.

Aaron Selbig

Documentary filmmaker Rick Prelinger makes films that are carefully pieced together from his collection of more than 14,000 home movies.

Two of them are playing this week at the Traverse City Film Festival. One film takes a look at the American road trip. The other is sort of a time capsule of the city of Detroit.

It’s National Poetry Month and in its honor, we are exploring the work and styles of Michigan poets.

Ken Mikolowski, a poet and poetry professor at the University of Michigan, has just released his fifth book, ThatThat. It’s a book that reveals this poet’s mastery of the short poem – no poem within the book is longer than three short lines.

“Haiku is much too long for me,” Mikolowski said.

Stateside celebrates National Poetry Month with a special month-long series on poetry in Michigan.

We'll be talking with Michigan poets about their new work, about poetry in the 21st century and about why poetry continues to inspire.

Lots of people daydream about ditching their jobs and doing something they truly love.

Heather Merritt is someone who did just that.

Merritt’s workday used to happen inside of a jail. She worked as a substance abuse therapist helping inmates with their addictions. These days her “work” happens at thrift stores, at artisans markets and inside her art studio.

But the leap from therapist to artist happened accidentally. Kind of. Michigan Radio’s Kyle Norris has this profile:


Painting Jazz

Jul 2, 2014

If you take in a jazz concert at Chateau Chantal, you’ll see more than musicians jamming. You’ll also see an artist painting the musicians while they perform.

Lisa Flahive sets up with an easel and watercolors in front of a jazz combo. As they play, Lisa moves to the music and makes pencil sketches of the musicians. She then adds big swashes of color to the paper before brushing in the detail work. Flahive began painting jazz musicians in front of an audience about a year ago and she never would have guessed she’d be doing her artwork in front of so many people.

Where is serious music going?

Mar 26, 2014

Where is 'classical' music headed in the future?  Interlochen Arts Academy alumni Theo VanDyke, a trumpeter now at Juilliard, and Kens Lui, a trombonist at New England Conservatory, talk with two leaders at Interlochen Center for the Arts:  President Jeffrey Kimpton and Director of Music Kedrik Merwin, about their thoughts on music innovation, musical assignments to avoid, and the exhilarating life that music offers.