Stateside: Young activists and the NAACP; decline of bobwhite quail; Traverse City tech economy

Jul 18, 2019

Today on Stateside, as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) prepares to hold its 110th National Convention in Detroit this weekend, how can the organization attract and empower young activists? Plus, why a member of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians is addressing a group of world leaders at the United Nations in Geneva this week.

Listen to the full show above or find individual segments below. 

Is the NAACP relevant to young people? This activist says yes. 

  • Founded in 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People calls itself the “oldest and boldest” civil rights organization, but some question whether the NAACP is as bold as it could be. So, are young people still interested in joining an organization that’s better known for working within the system?
  • Kyra Mitchell is the youth vice president for the Michigan State Conference of the NAACP, which is hosting its 110th National Convention in Detroit starting this weekend. She tells us why she thinks a young activist would want to join the NAACP, and tells us what she thinks are the most pressing civil rights issues here in Michigan.

Grand Traverse Band tribal member appeals to UN for help getting compensation over broken 1885 treaty

  • A member of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians is in Geneva this week to address the United Nations. John Petoskey is hoping to see his tribe compensated for land they were promised in an 1855 treaty with the United States government, but never received. Petoskey  breaks down the history of treaties signed by his tribe and the United States, and explains what kind of compensation he’s seeking from the American government. 

The northern bobwhite quail once flourished in Michigan. What happened? 

  • The number of northern bobwhite quail has declined by 85% since 1966. The birds were once common in much of the southern half of Michigan's Lower Peninsula, but they're a rare sight today. 
  • Al Stewart is an upland game bird specialist with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. He explains why the bobwhite population has dropped so dramatically, and what’s being done to restore their numbers.

How a planned demolition spurred a call for historic designation for Detroit's Eastern Market

  • The Eastern Market in Detroit has been in a bit of an upheaval in recent months. Firm Real Estate has been buying up buildings with plans to demolish some of them. Now, a Detroit City Council member is asking for a local historic district designation for the whole Eastern Market area.
  • Kirk Pinho is a reporter for Crain’s Business Detroit. He gives us the details of the planned demolition and explains how the Eastern Market would change if it's designated as a local historic district.

Attorney says that Traverse City is on the cusp of an economic revolution

  • Economic development professionals across the state are constantly trying to figure out what their communities need to draw new businesses and residents. The Traverse City Record Eagle reported on a recent speech that attorney Michael Naughton gave to the Economic Club of Traverse City, in which he said that the city is on the cusp of an economic revolution. Naughton joins Stateside to talk about how Traverse City can compete with other, larger metropolitan areas. 

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