Stateside: Michigan lacks affordable short-term loans; reviving an historic Pontiac neighborhood

Oct 18, 2018
Originally published on October 19, 2018 5:43 pm
 

Today on Stateside, we hear about an effort to rehabilitate houses in an historic Pontiac neighborhood originally built by GM for its workers. Plus, what Michigan could do to encourage affordable short-term lenders to set up shop in the state. 

Listen to the full show above or find individual stories below. 


Michigan regulations make affordable short-term loans hard to come by

 


  

  • Alex Horowitz is a senior research officer of Pew Charitable Trust’s consumer finance project. A recent study from Pew found that the installment loans offered by consumer finance companies aren't as cost effective in the state of Michigan as they could be.


 

Voter voices: Family values and reproductive rights

 


  • We've been sending reporters and producers across the state to ask people two questions: What are the most important issues for you as a Michigan voter? What concerns you most about our political climate right now? Today we hear from Baise David and Audrey Meyers.


 

Pontiac neighborhood built by GM competes for historic preservation money

 


  

  • John Bry, coordinator of the Oakland County Mainstreet Program, talks about the GM Modern Housing neighborhood and the effort to get funding to restore houses originally built by GM for their workers through the Vote Your Mainstreet campaign.


Independent candidate Graveline pushes for a less partisan attorney general’s office

 


 

  • There’s a recent addition to the choices for attorney general on the ballot this November: Chris Graveline. He explains what his priorities in office would be, and why he thinks the office of attorney general has become too partisan.


 

Howes:  Financially squeezed Detroit can’t afford not to give Ford tax incentives


  • Daniel Howes, business columnist for the Detroit News, tells us why he thinks a $104 million tax break for Ford Motor Company will be a net gain for the city.


They were forced off their land. Their homes burned. 118 years later, their descendants fight on.

 


  • For part four of our series, "An Idea on the Land," Michigan Radio reporter Dustin Dwyer tells the history of the Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, who were forced off their land in Cheboygan County in 1900.

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